Brad Thorn: A Tribute

What can be said of this man and his career that hasn’t been already? His commitment and passion towards both rugby union and rugby league is something that can be admired and respected by all, and should serve as a benchmark, albeit a very high one, that any professional sporting player should strive to achieve. You have to admit that if you reached for Brad Thorn and only just missed, you’ve still done pretty well.

His first stint at the Brisbane Broncos is immediately note-worthy, not just for his own personal achievements but the speed in which they were achieved. The 94 season, in which he debuted in week twelve, saw him take out the rookie of the year award with representative honors for Queensland and Australia to follow within the next three years. The 97 grand final would be Thorn’s first taste of premiership glory, one he would experience the following year and then again in 2000.

After achieving success at every level in rugby league, Thorn turned his attention to the ruthless and unforgiving world of New Zealand rugby. Someone of lesser talent and determination may have stumbled in this new, harsh environment but he barely missed a beat. The Canterbury Crusaders took out the NPC with Thorn slipping, almost effortlessly, into the position of lock forward. A chance to become the first man since Bill Hardcastle to represent Australia in rugby league and New Zealand in rugby union was offered to him at seasons end, but he turned it down citing his uncertainty of his commitment to the fifteen man game. But, come 2003, he could resist the temptation no longer and made his official debut for the All Blacks in the Rugby World Cup and continued to represent them in the Tri-Nations which New Zealand would go on to win.

A final NPC with Canterbury would see Thorn return once again to the Broncos in 2005. While many expected to see the champion forward in the twilight of his career, nothing would seem further from the truth. He would go on to not only represent Queensland but also take out another premiership in 2006. After being named one of the 20 greatest Broncos to ever play for the club, he made the decision to, once again, switch back to rugby union.

Thorn was again in unstoppable form, achieving Crusader and All Black selection in only his second year back in the game. After more super 14 titles and Tri-Nations success he finally reached the holy grail of rugby by taking out the World Cup after a hard fought 8-7 win over France in 2011. As if this wasn’t enough, a short stint with European champions Leinster would see him add the Heineken Cup to his long list of achievements.

When you want to describe a man like Brad Thorn any number of superlatives will do. But to fully understand just how remarkable this career is, you must first realize that it hasn’t even finished yet. That is correct, at age 37 Thorn has signed on with Super Rugby franchise the Highlanders for the 2013 season. For myself, it seems almost certain that this will be his swan song but for some reason a lingering doubt remains. I guess with someone like Brad Thorn, can you ever be sure of anything?

Camisetas De Fútbol Baratas,Comprar Camisetas de Futbol Baratas Para Hombre, Mujer y Niños. Camisetas Futbol Baratas 2018-2019. Camisetas futbol

Conquer Stress and Anxiety Naturally With This Safe and Effective Method

Rhodiola Rosea is the latest natural remedy to join the arsenal

of natural anxiety and stress reducers.

Rhodiola Rosea, also known as Golden Root, is a native plant of

arctic Siberia. For centuries it has been used by eastern

European and Asian cultures for physical endurance, work

productivity, longevity, resistance to high altitude sickness,

and to treat fatigue, depression, anemia, impotence,

gastrointestinal ailments, infections, and nervous system

disorders.

The first recorded medicinal applications of rodia riza (renamed

Rhodiola Rosea) was made by the Greek physician, Dioscorides, in

77 C.E. in ‘De Materia Medica’. Rhodiola Rosea has been included

in official Russian medicine since 1969.

Despite its long history, the Western world has only recently

become aware of the health benefits of Rhodiola Rosea. It has

come to the attention of many natural health practitioners

because of studies which tested its affects on combating anxiety

and stress.

Rhodiola Rosea is considered an adaptogen. This means it has an

overall stabilizing effect on the body without disrupting other

functions. Its ability to normalize hormones may be effective for

treating depression and anxiety.

Studies of Rhodiola Rosea show that it stimulates

neurotransmitters and enhances their effects on the brain. This

includes the ability for the brain to process serotonin which

helps the body to adapt to stress.

Since adaptogens improve the body’s overall ability to handle

stress, it has been studied to identify it’s effects on

biological, chemical and physical stress.

A study was performed to test the effects of Rhodiola Rosea when

stress is caused by intense mental work (such as final exams).

Such tests concluded that using Rhodiola Rosea improved the

amount and quality of work, increasing mental clarity and

reducing the effects of fatigue.

The effects of Rhodiola Rosea have also been tested on stress and

anxiety from both physical and emotional sources. A report by the

American Botanical Council states that «Most users find that it

improves their mood, energy level, and mental clarity.» They also

report on a study that indicated Rhodiola Rosea could increase

stress tolerance while at the same time protecting the brain and

heart from the physical affects of stress.

This report included details of studies which highlight the

overall health benefits of Rhodiola Rosea.

The generally recommended dose is 200-600mg/day. The active

properties should be a minimum 0.8 percent salidroside and 3

percent rosavin.

It is important for consumers to know that Rhodiola may be sold

using other species that do not share the properties of Rhodiola

Rosea, or at ineffective strengths for treatment. Anyone with

depression or anxiety should also check with a health

professional when treating these symptoms.

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes

only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any

disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any

health care program.

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Emily Clark

England Expects a Decent Strikeforce

England take on Slovakia in a friendly on Saturday (17.00, Setanta Sports 1) then the Ukraine in a World Cup Qualifier on Wednesday (20.00, ITV1).

Here is the England squad in full (since the withdrawal of Ledley King):

Goalkeepers: David James (Portsmouth), Robert Green (West Ham United), Ben Foster (Manchester United) Defenders: Leighton Baines (Everton), Phil Jagielka (Everton), Joleon Lescott (Everton), Ashley Cole (Chelsea), John Terry (Chelsea), Rio Ferdinand (Manchester United), Glen Johnson (Portsmouth), Matthew Upson (West Ham United), Ledley King (Tottenham Hotspur). Midfielders: Gareth Barry (Aston Villa), Michael Carrick (Manchester United), Frank Lampard (Chelsea), Stewart Downing (Middlesbrough), David Beckham (AC Milan), Shaun Wright-Phillips (Manchester City), Aaron Lennon (Tottenham Hotspur), Steven Gerrard (Liverpool). Forwards: Carlton Cole (West Ham United), Peter Crouch (Portsmouth), Emile Heskey (Aston Villa), Wayne Rooney (Manchester United).

Our weakness is our strikeforce. Carlton Cole? Really? Heskey is an able foil, Crouch an impact sub… and Rooney is yet to find his best position or arguably form for his country. That is a severe paucity of options. Where are the world class English forwards? They are not abroad; are they being overlooked in the Premiership? Let’s have a look at the top scoring Englishmen…

Steven Gerrard 13

Peter Crouch 11

Kevin Davies 11

Gabriel Agbonlahor 10

Darren Bent 10

Frank Lampard 10

Carlton Cole 9

Jermain Defoe 9

Wayne Rooney 9

Michael Owen 8

Matthew Taylor 8

Andrew Johnson 7

Jason Roberts 7

Marlon King 6

James Beattie 5

Of these, those not included are Davies, Agbonlahor, Bent, Defoe, Owen, Taylor, Johnson, Roberts, King and Beattie. Let’s have a look at them…

Kevin Davies – What does he offer that Emile Heskey doesn’t? Well, goals, for a start. Heskey is arguably a better link man, better at providing and laying on chances – but Davies is good at holding the ball up, a real pain in the arse for defenders, and is scoring goals. He suffers from playing for Bolton; perhaps he would get more of a chance at a more fashionable club?

Gabriel Agbonlahor – He was included for the last game against Spain, as well as several other of Capello’s squads. However, he is on a long barren streak at the moment, and probably deserves his demotion to the U21s.

Darren Bent – Going by Capello’s maxim (which he seems to have abandoned in the case of Ben Foster) players will not play for England without playing regularly for their club. And as Bent is far from first choice at Spurs, he will suffer. His total of 10 goals is impressive for a bit part player, but his all round game is just not good enough for international football.

Jermaine Defoe – Injured – but assured of a role if fit. Who would have envisaged a time when Defoe was so sorely missed?

Michael Owen – Capello clearly doesn’t fancy him – and he’s not fully fit. And he’s lost most of his pace. But for my money he is still the best finisher England have, and should be in the squad. If he’s fit, who else would you rather throw on with twenty minutes remaining and needing to nick a goal?

Matthew Taylor – He is a midfielder. Which says a lot for the English strikers.

Andrew Johnson – There is perhaps a case here, but 7 goals in 26 appearances is hardly setting the world on fire. He is essentially a poor man’s Defoe (or Owen) and is different to our other strikers – just not good enough!

Jason Roberts, Marlon King, James Beattie – They are simply not international class. All big, bustling strikers they are already behind the likes of Davies and Cole who themselves are short of international class.

So there we are – we just don’t have any good strikers. It’s not Capello’s fault – aside from possibly Owen, and only when he’s fit, it’s difficult to make a case for anyone who’s been excluded.

At the back we look extremely strong – if a player with the quality of Jonathan Woodgate does not make it you know you have strength in depth. Likewise in midfield, where although the perennial Gerrard/Lampard debate is yet to be resolved they are both indisputably great players, and are ably supported/backed up by Barry and Carrick in the middle. Wide you have a multitude of options right, with SWP, Lennon, Walcott, Beckham, and Gerrard – one of whom may play left.

But Capello must have a big headache up top. It’s likely he will play Gerrard off Rooney, which is potentially exciting – but other than that combination (and that will obviously remove Gerrard’s dynamism from the midfield) there is little to whet the appetite. Heskey and Cole? No thanks.

Oh how we long for the days of Shearer, Sheringham, Owen, Fowler, Ferdinand, Wright, Collymore, Le Tissier, Cole – at one stage they were all available for England selection. That seems incomprehensible now; with that embarrassment of riches Carlton Cole would be seeking a second nationality.

Fortunately the likes of Slovakia and the Ukraine should not expose our lack of striking options – but we need to find a potent pairing in time for WC 2010.

Las Camisetas de fútbol de adidas se encuentran entre las preferidas de muchos equipos. Descubre por qué visitando nuestra colección en la web. by Matthew Rowe

Landlords HMO House Insurance

It is no secret that Insurance is largely calculated based on the postcode of the property, the type of tenant, and the risk of flooding, and crime rates etc. Insurers also hike premiums for city locations for no other reason than city prices are expected, by the consumer, to be higher.

As far as Landlords of Student Let properties are concerned, Landlords who need an HMO Insurance policy can expect to pay huge premiums if the postcode is even remotely near a city university. Landlords HMO Insurance near any of the universities in London is automatically inflated, as it is in Cambridge, Manchester, Leeds, Edinburgh and so on and so forth. There are slightly higher risks to an insurer when the property is let on a multi tenure basis to students, but the price increases outweigh that risk.

It is vital that Landlords avoid the main big brands, and the insurers who are running TV advertisements, and delve deeper into what is actually available to them. Insurance is a massive market, there are hundreds of Insurers and underwriters who want a piece of that city business, and are willing to offer more competitive deals, but you need to shop clever!

Landlords HMO Insurance is a niche product that requires specific underwriting, and by choosing a specialist insurer, and not just the big names that come to mind immediately – savings can be made. For example – if you let your property to Phd students, some insurers will classify those tenants as working professionals. This can halve the cost of the Insurance to the landlord. It is not a broadcast fact because the type of Insurers that offer these savings are not plastered all over the media. Insurers like Ageas, Lloyds of London, Vasek, Equity Redstar and many more;- all reputable established underwriting companies – but you don’t hear their name on the TV or Radio.

There are lots of ways to keep the costs of HMO Insurance manageable, and lots of Insurers will offer incentives to Landlords such as Interest Free Direct Debits, to help with their bottom line, and cash flow – again, this is not always a well-known and advertised fact. They simply sit behind UK Insurance Brokers, providing specific Insurance policies to their clients at low-cost rates because they don’t need to service the customer directly, and can save money on the business. The Customer Service, the Advertising Costs, the Administration costs – they are all the brokers’ costs, so the Insurance provider can afford to offer better rates.

Going directly to the biggest names will automatically cost you more as a policy holder. Use a Broker – particularly for niche products. Brokers have access to a large range of products and turn over a high volume of business to the insurers; this enables the Landlord to benefit from choice, and much more competitive premiums. This particularly applies to Landlords who need HMO Insurance Policy’s, with city postcodes near a University or College.

It makes absolute sense for any property owner to shop wisely, and protect their investment with quality Insurance.

comprar camisetas futbol spain y selecciones nacionales y todos los clubs para hombre,mujer y niños,Camisetas de fútbol en camisetasfutboles.es. by Hayley Connolly

Creditable or Calamitous? Reflections of a Derby Fan on a Season That Promised Promotion

As this 2014-15 Championship season races toward its conclusion, it’s hard to determine whether it represents success or failure for Derby County Football Club. Perhaps any individual assessment depends on one’s glass being generally half-full, or half-empty. As a Rams fan exiled in the Middle East, but able to see many of their games live or recorded in full afterwards, I haven’t made up my own mind on the matter just yet. This article is intended as a means toward that end.

Last season ended in play-off heartbreak. Derby were, of the play-off quartet, comfortably the form side going into the end-of-season event, and swept aside sixth-placed Brighton 6-2 over two legs. In the other semi-final, a dangerous Wigan side, who had earlier defeated eventual Premier League champions Manchester City in an astonishing FA Cup result, were edged out 2-1 by QPR, whose own form had been anything but convincing during the second half of the season. Derby controlled the Wembley final, and seemed almost certain to win when Rangers were reduced to ten men for a professional foul early in the second half; however, not for the first play-off final in their history, the Rams were defeated by a late winner, the product of two substandard pieces of defending and a wonderful finish by Bobby Zamora.

Such was Derby’s style and momentum, so impressive their individual performances – midfield starlet Will Hughes and prolific target man Chris Martin the most prominent among them – that the bookmakers installed the Rams as pre-season favourites this time around. Prospects were boosted still further when George Thorne, composed loan signing and Wembley man of the match, was signed permanently during the summer. Within days, however, Thorne – already no stranger to injuries in his short career – was ruled out for most of the season after damaging his knee in a friendly against Zenit St Petersburg. Appearing not to trust a whole season’s work to his natural replacement, the experienced John Eustace, Steve McClaren was delighted when the club’s player recruitment team snapped up Omar Mascarell, a stylish holding midfielder on the periphery of Real Madrid’s squad. It appeared to be a real coup, although all parties recognised that the Spaniard would need time to adapt to the greater speed and physicality of the Championship.

The season began with a 1-0 win over newly promoted Rotherham United, courtesy of a fine late strike from Irish midfielder Jeff Hendrick; a victory earned, in no small part, by the exciting contribution of new full-back Cyrus Christie, acquired from Coventry City to replace the solid, but now departed Liverpool loanee, Andre Wisdom. Christie’s defending was at least adequate (if not as impregnable as his predecessor), but it was the newcomer’s marauding runs that led many fans to feel hopeful that, far from the position being weakened, Derby might attain to greater attacking impetus from defence this season.

Of more concern, with Eustace out of favour, was the decision to play Hughes in the team’s apparently non-negotiable holding midfield role. While the player was undoubtedly good enough to play there, it was clear that neither of the more advanced players – Bryson, who many had expected to begin the season playing his football for a Premier League team, and Hendrick – could do exactly what Hughes was capable of further up the field. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the slight Hughes was not as comfortable with the physical side of the position as either the stocky Thorne or the guileful Eustace, and found himself almost sharing the position with substitute Mascarell from very early in the season. The Spaniard’s passing and energy did much to compensate for the evident weaknesses that many had predicted in his game: opponents gave him little time on the ball, and he quickly found himself on the receiving end of some rather combative challenges.

There were warning signs for Derby in a spirited but disjointed second league match at Sheffield Wednesday, which ended goalless. A first defeat followed in the next match, as stylish Charlton outplayed their more fancied guests, winning 3-2 and leaving many to wonder when the Rams would hit the performance levels of the previous season. They were encouraged by a merciless second-half display against Fulham, as Derby pummelled the plummeting Cottagers 5-1. Welcome to the Championship.

The Rams then embarked on an unbeaten run that spanned twelve games, including wins against expansive Bournemouth (2-0), Blackburn (3-2), Bolton (2-0) and Reading (3-0) (the latter three away from home); and resilient draws against early leaders and local rivals Nottingham Forest (1-1), and Cardiff (2-2) at home, a match in which the Rams had trailed by two goals. Derby’s comeback that day was begun by a debut goal from a new season-long loan signing from Liverpool: the fleet-footed and direct Jordon Ibe, whose contribution, with hindsight, seems as significant in Derby’s fortunes as was his premature return to Anfield in January.

That unbeaten run was curtailed by dogged Wigan, who belied their poor early season form by coming from behind to win 2-1 at the iPro Stadium. Derby then played two games in West London, hitting Fulham for five again (this time in the League Cup) before once again throwing away a lead against Brentford who, it seems, have never looked back since their last-minute win that day, courtesy of a fine goal from Stuart Dallas.

Derby needed to find their form – and find it they did, deservedly seeing off Huddersfield 3-2, before arguably their finest performance of the season in the annihilation of Wolves, 5-0 at the iPro. In the next match, Craig Bryson, who had so far struggled to reproduce his high standards of the two preceding seasons, scored a beauty to edge out Watford on their own turf. Suddenly Derby looked ready to seize their opportunity and run away with the league, just as their East Midlands rivals from Leicester had done the previous year.

It wasn’t to be so straightforward, unfortunately. The Rams went into their away match at Leeds, a team Derby had beaten for fun in recent seasons, seemingly unprepared for the grit and graft that would be needed to return with the points. They were outfought, and defeated, 0-2. But Steve McClaren prided himself on a team that could bounce back from disappointment, and Derby erupted out of the blocks against Brighton, winning the game with three first-half goals. In the opposing eleven that day was loanee Darren Bent, a wily, seasoned striker unable to convince then manager Paul Lambert of his right to a place in the Aston Villa side. Derby fans would be glad to see more of the discarded Bent very soon.

The following week, Derby were conquered at the summit by Middlesbrough, after a dour display in the North East demonstrated the worst they were capable of; Boro were organised and clinical, and undid Derby in their first attack, with former Rams loanee Patrick Bamford celebrating his opener gleefully – much to the annoyance of Derby fans, who had always had to overlook his affinity for their hated rivals, Forest. The Rams showed more fight and no little skill against a tidy and pressurising Norwich City side a week later, but were fairly denied a win when they conceded another late goal. The pattern of the previous season, in which Derby had become famed for their indefatigable spirit and late goalscoring, seemed to be shifting in the other direction.

The Rams began the festive period with a thumping win, 4-0 in the Birmingham snow. That was backed up with a revenge reversal of their 2-0 defeat at Leeds, and an excellent 1-0 win at Ipswich. John Eustace, hardly a fixture in the team, was immense in front of the back four, but his late dismissal and injury – from which he has yet to return despite two operations – would lead the Rams into the East Midlands derby once again relying on the unconvincing Mascarell. Even Forest fans approached the match fearfully. Their side had lost the previous season’s fixture 5-0, and the early season pacesetters now found themselves on a run of eight games without a win. Derby, fortuitously ahead but easily the better team before the break, gave a sickening validation of the phrase «game of two halves», and Forest exulted in a deserved shock win that would prolong the tenure of manager Stuart Pearce for a few more weeks. (This represented a bright side for many Rams fans, who were convinced their rivals’ progress would remain stagnant with the former England legend at the helm). Stunned at forfeiting local bragging rights, Derby fans demanded better, and were rewarded with three straight wins against Blackburn, Cardiff and Bolton.

The January transfer window had brought Bent in without a recall clause for his parent club, as well as Manchester United’s Jesse Lingard, and Hull City’s Tom Ince, who made an instant impact with a fabulous brace in the 4-1 destruction of Bolton. Leeds United captain Stephen Warnock, still not fit after being injured in the Rams’ 2-0 win over his side, came in to «add experience» to the squad, and presumably to spur the unspectacular Craig Forsyth to higher performance levels. An interesting further addition was the Spaniard Raul Albentosa, who Derby’s recruitment team appeared to have been stalking for some time, and who arrived in Derby having bought out his own contract with La Liga team Eibar, for whom he had offered some impressive performances throughout the season. Unfortunately, a niggling injury would delay Albentosa’s league debut for over a month.

Ince found the net again in an encouraging 2-2 midweek draw at top-of-the-table Bournemouth, where the most significant moment of the match would prove the early replacement of nineteen-goal Chris Martin. He would not return for eleven games; suddenly Bent’s loan signing seemed very important indeed, although a slightly different system of attack was needed to accommodate the latter’s style. The Rams approached the following midweek match at struggling Rotherham knowing that a win would take them back to the summit. Yet, once again, they failed to take their chance, with only a spirited fightback earning them a 3-3 draw, having trailed 1-3. Inspired by the return of George Thorne after seven months on the sidelines, Derby then won back-to-back home games against Sheffield Wednesday and Charlton, and found themselves on top of the league for the third time this season. Despite having repeatedly failed to press home the advantages they had gained, the bookies still made McClaren’s dangerous Derby side favourites for the title. They were to be proved emphatically wrong.

What followed resembles the stuff of nightmares for Derby fans. It began with a lacklustre defeat at Fulham, in which now pivotal loan signing Bent limped off, forcing the industrious and vastly improved Johnny Russell to assume a central striking role that he would retain for the next four games, without once finding the net. In addition, Thorne was again out of action, replaced in West London by the still-misfiring Mascarell. Typically, after the Fulham defeat, McClaren demanded a response. He got one, but not a result; the Rams battered Brighton but somehow contrived to lose the match 0-2. The focus intensified on Derby’s defence, arguably culpable for both goals. A performance and a win were needed when Birmingham came to the iPro, and the Rams picked them off easily, strolling toward a 2-0 victory as the match entered the third of four added second-half minutes. A few hearts were aflutter when the unspectacular Blues won, and converted, a penalty; Rams fans redoubled their whistling for full-time, the match length having already surpassed the additional time indicated. Nevertheless, a team with pretensions of winning promotion would surely be able to see the game out. Birmingham equalised in the seventh minute of injury time. The day ended with four teams on 66 points, separated by goal difference. Derby were still «in the mix», but nobody was quite sure how they were going to stay there on current form. And the games were only getting harder.

Derby went to resurgent Norwich the following Saturday with assistant Paul Simpson vowing that it was time to «win ugly» if necessary. Realistically, most Derby fans would have taken a draw, and when debutant Jamie Hanson’s corner was spilled into his own net by England goalkeeper John Ruddy, that’s exactly what they got. Hanson retained his place for the crucial midweek home match against Middlesbrough. Derby were toothless, loanee Lingard missing the best chance to fall to a white shirt. Once again, Boro were resolute; once again, it was Patrick Bamford, object of fear and loathing in Derby, who settled the match with an excellent finish. Derby were rocking.

The final game before the latest international break would take them to Wolves, hapless victims of the Rams’ finest moment of the season to date. McClaren and Simpson warned that the returns of Thorne and Martin may not be risked before the international break, but Bent was back to take his place at the centre of a truly astonishing refereeing controversy. Through on goal, the returning striker was fouled by Wolves captain and last man Danny Batth. Ince swept the ball into the net. The referee, who had already whistled for the foul, disallowed the goal and awarded a free-kick just outside the area. Rams fans watched in horror as the official, smiling sickeningly, refused to find any card in his pocket for the offender, much less the red one he clearly deserved. In some sort of grotesque tribute to John Ruddy, the normally reliable Lee Grant punched the ball into his own net to help Wolves wrap up a 2-0 win and move to within two points of Derby, who were slipping further from automatic promotion with every match. Fans picked the team apart, looking for an XI who could win the next match at home to high-flying Watford, thereby dragging the Rams’ promotion wagon back on track. Full-backs came under fire most of all, and here it was difficult to make a case for the defence. Left-back Forsyth, far superior defensively than in attack (perhaps surprisingly for a former midfielder), had compounded the injustice at Wolves by facilitating their first goal, inexplicably passing the ball to an opponent in a dangerous position. It was by no means the first time the Scotsman’s distribution had been found wanting during the season.

On the other side, Cyrus Christie was a nerve-shredded shadow of his early-season self. His first-half gift to Watford’s Vydra was cancelled out on the stroke of half-time by a Bent penalty, as the Rams’ opponents were reduced to ten men. Christie would not re-emerge after the break. Sadly, nor would George Thorne, attempting his second comeback of the season but lasting little more than twenty minutes. Once again, Derby contrived to throw away a winning position; Watford celebrated their 2-2 draw with delight, strengthening their own push for automatic promotion, while Derby retained their play-off place only on goal difference. The solitary silver lining seemed now to be the brief substitute appearance of Chris Martin, to whose absence so many had attributed the Rams’ slump.

On Easter Monday, with over four thousand Rams fans roaring them on, Derby finally picked up their first win in eight matches, as the talismanic Martin came off the bench to sweep them ahead at lowly Wigan. A typically opportunistic strike from Bent wrapped up the victory, leaving the Rams fascinatingly poised before the following weekend’s home match with Brentford. On paper, it seems the most difficult of the Rams’ remaining five fixtures, of which three are to be played at the iPro. However, with second-placed Norwich already five points ahead, and Watford and Middlesbrough much better placed to take advantage of any slip by the Canaries or leaders Bournemouth, only the most optimistic of Derby fans could reasonably expect automatic promotion at this stage. On the contrary, with Wolves in the best form of the current play-off place occupants, and Brentford able to overhaul the Rams with a win in their head-to-head, Derby still face a fierce battle to ensure their own place in the end-of-season competition that has already caused them so much heartache.

How has it come to this? And does the season represent a success or a failure for the Rams?

On reflection, it is important to consider the weight of expectation that has hung over the team all season. It is true that Derby were formidable during the latter part of the 2013-14 season, playing some scintillating football, and with an embarrassment of (injury-free) riches among their playing personnel. Yet arguably only Hughes and Russell have improved on their performances of the previous season; the immaculate Thorne has managed only three starts; Martin’s contribution has been blunted by the disastrous timing and duration of his injury; and the likes of Hendrick and Bryson have failed by some distance to match their performance levels of the previous season. Some loan signings have contributed much – particularly Ibe – while others have offered mixed fortunes: the injury-hit but prolific Bent; the frequently fantastic but oft-frustrating Ince, whose ball retention has been disappointing but who has scored some wonderful goals; and Mascarell, possessing all the vision and passing prowess one would expect of a Madrid graduate, but without ever providing a satisfactory solution for the role he was brought in to play.

Most attention has centred around the defence. In stark contrast to last season, during which the names of Andre Wisdom, Richard Keogh, Jake Buxton and Craig Forsyth seldom left the team sheet, McClaren has constantly tinkered with his defensive personnel this time around. Some fans have shown little patience with captain Keogh – possibly something of a hangover from his Wembley shocker – but in reality, the full-backs have proved a weaker link for most of the season. Christie, especially, seems particularly low on confidence, while the more self-assured Forsyth perhaps remains optimistic that his own form is solid enough and will improve still further; however, those who have endured his substandard performances throughout the season will likely have been glad of Warnock’s competent league debut at left-back in the victory at Wigan.

Another bone of contention relates to formation. While Derby have been more than a little unfortunate to experience long-term injuries to three holding midfield players (Thorne, Eustace and Mascarell), the lack of alternative playing styles and formations have also been mooted by fans as sources of frustration and failure to overturn teams that have set up defensively against the Rams and gained their rewards by doing so. The recent switch, through necessity, to a 4-2-3-1 has only added weight to this argument, not least because the defensive contribution of Mascarell has been questionable all season, and has almost certainly exacerbated any problems among the defence personnel. The use of Chris Martin behind Darren Bent has been used only fleetingly (albeit injuries have undoubtedly reduced the scope for this), while there is also a strong case for positioning the incisive passing of Hughes behind the front man, a move that has not been tried at all. This is not to suggest that the fans know better than McClaren; yet fans are certainly in a position to recognise what has not been working for long periods of the season. Managers, like players, can be «lucky» – not just in what they and their teams do, but in how they are perceived. Most things McClaren touched last season turned to gold. Such has been the man’s redemption since his ignominious England denouement, perhaps supporters had become over-confident in his ability. His true managerial performance, perhaps, lies somewhere between those two extremes of appraisal.

The mantra from the club, and the local press, remains that a Derby side returning to their best form are capable of ensnaring a promotion place this season. Some will fear that the likes of Will Hughes will be heading to the Premier League very soon, irrespective of how the Rams fare from now until the end of May.

It is never an easy ride being a Derby fan; one cannot sit back and get comfortable.

Derby have never been about coasting, but the rollercoaster.

Las Camisetas de fútbol de adidas se encuentran entre las preferidas de muchos equipos. Descubre por qué visitando nuestra colección en la web. by James Orme

EPL 2011-12: Manchester City Vs Arsenal Match Time

Table toppers Manchester City take on Arsenal in match week 16 of the Premier League when the teams clash on Sunday, December 18, 2011.

Man City suffered their first loss of the league season when they went down 2-1 away at Chelsea, in match week 15. Lampard became an instant hero for the home side when he came off the bench to score the match winner seven minutes before time. The sides were locked at 1-1 after Balotelli’s early lead for City was neutralised shortly before the interval on the back of Raul Meireles’ strike. City began explosively with waves of attack in the first half hour to exploit Chelsea’s porous defence. It culminated in Balotelli’s goal, when Aguero cut in from the right to relay the ball past Terry to Aguero who in turn passed it to Balotelli to do the rest. At the end of the day, City would have rued their many missed scoring opportunities in the first half when the home side’s defence was all at sea, trying to cope with the marauding City attack.

In match week 15, Arsenal registered a 1-0 victory over Everton, in a match hosted by Gunners at the Emirates. Robin Van Persie – who else – scored the only goal of the game to give Arsenal something to celebrate their 125th anniversary by. Van Persie’s spectacular volley on 71 minutes brought relief to home fans who were frustrated by the home side’s many missed chances.

Head to head, in the last 10 years, Man City and Arsenal have met in 20 league games, with Arsenal winning on 14 occasions and City on 3, with the remaining games ending in stalemates. The last time these teams met was in January 2011; that match played at the Emirates ended in a goalless stalemate.

Man City have won 8, and drawn and lost 1 each of their last 10 league matches, while Arsenal have identically won 8 and drawn and lost 1 each of their last 10 games.

Currently at the top of the table, City have hosted 7 home games, this season, winning all 7; the Gunners who are 5th placed on the league table have had 3 wins, 1 draw and 3 losses, in their 7 away games.

With Chelsea causing City’s title bid a mild jolt in match week 15, the Manchester squad will have a point or more to prove against the Gunners whose ramshackle defence could be put to its stiffest test yet.

Man City’s starting eleven against Chelsea: Joe Hart, Pablo Zabaleta, Joleon Lescott, Vincent Kompany, Gael Clichy, James Milner, Gnegneri Toure Yaya, Gareth Barry, David Silva, Sergio Aguero, Mario Balotelli.

Arsenal’s starting eleven against Everton: Wojciech Szczesny, Johan Djourou, Per Metresacker, Laurent Koscielny, Thomas Vermaelen, Mikel Arteta, Alex Song, Theo Walcott, Aaron Ramsey, Yao Gervinho, Robin Van Persie.

Camisetas de fútbol Equipamiento, ropa y calzado deportivo . Compra online ahora con los mejores descuentos. by Suresh Iyer

English Premier League Players to Watch For This Season (2008-2009)

Season on season stars are born in the most prestigious and glamorous league of the world. Be it goal-machine Cristiano Ronaldo or the prolific Chelsea scorer Didier Drogba or Liverpool striker Fernando Torres, everyone plays for a reason. Fame, money and substance follows the best in the breed.

Now let us look at the players who are favorites for this season of Barclays Premier League :

1 – Cristiano Ronaldo

Club: Manchester United

Position: Winger

The best and safest bet to put your money on is Cristiano Ronaldo. He has been the buzz of the summer regarding his transfer to Spanish club Real Madrid. And why not, we are talking of a player who scored 42 goals in a season, winning his team both Premier League and UEFA Champion’s league. With the news that he’s going to stay ateast for one more season at Old Trafford ManU fans can expect their third consecutive Premiership title this season.

While Sir Alex Ferguson is yet to sign a striker for the team (most proabaly Tottenham striker Dimitar Berbatov), Ronaldo along with Wayne Roonay and Tevez forms one of the most lethal forward line-up to face with. If he continues his scoring streak, he surely is the best that Premiership can offer this season.

2 – Didier Drogba

Club: Chelsea

Position: Striker

He has done it before and he can do it again. To win big games for Chelsea. A prolif striker of the ball Didier Drogab is the only player whose presence gives Chelsea any hopes of winning titles this season.

With both Premiership and UEFA Championship’s loss to rivals Manchester United being very close, Drogba will be accompanied this time by ex-Barcelona

playmaker Deco to fill up th gaps. World Cup wiining coach Luis Felipe Scolari will also accompany them for the titles this season.

3 – Fernando Torres

Club: Liverpool

Position: Striker

Right man in right time at wrong place describes ace Liverpool striker Fernando Torres the best. After his wonderful season in 2007/08 Liverpool couldnot afford any titles as they lack players in other sections of the field.

This year, with Robbie Keane partnering him towards the goal post Liverpool can hope of any miracles. But Torres is the key player, and if he scores 40+ goals and Keane adds some then who knows, they might pull off something. Afterall football isn’t always prediaction.

4 – Cesc Fabregas

Club: Arsenal

Position: Central midfielder

Young and refreshing, Cesc will return to Arsenal with winning memories of Euro Cup winning. Arsenal has lost its top players this summer, but Samir Nasri’s inclusion in the team could do some young-wonders for Arsenal.

Cesc Fabregas’s performance, both in international and club football has been promising, but comparisons of him with Thierry Henry is like expecting a lot from the young legs.

5 – Jo

Club: Manchester City

Position: Striker

This Brazilian International is no easy customer to deal with. All of 21, the product from South American soccer giant Brazil, Jo will have to play a huge role in Man City because of their financial problems to bring in good players.

6 – Peter Crouch

Club: Portsmouth

Position: Striker

The tallest player in EPL with 6’7″, Crouch is considered by many as a under-rated player. With a goal per game ratio of 2 for national team England, his presence in Liverpool was nothing more than a substitute. He surely has found a right place to play in.

This was our list of some players to watch out for this season. Let us know which players found a place in your list of favorites.

Camisetas de fútbol baratas Tienda online, Comprar Camiseta futbol precio más barato y envío rápido. En nuestra tienda de camisetas de futbol baratas. by Amrit Swain

Soccer Fixture: Chelsea Versus Arsenal

Chelsea and Arsenal met in the First Division of the Football League at Stamford Bridge for the first time on the 9th November, 1907 – 30 years after the stadium had first been opened for use by the London Athletic Club. Chelsea won 2.1 with both goals scored by George Hilsdon. Arsenal's reply came from Charlie Satterthwaite.

George Hilsdon was the first player to score 100 goals for Chelsea and a weather vane modeled on him can still be seen at Stamford Bridge. Legend has it that Chelsea will suffer 'great misfortune' if it is ever removed, as it was during ground works in the late 1970's when Chelsea were in financial and football decline. Hilsdon was the victim of a gas attack on the Western Front in WWI and never played professional football again, dying in 1941. His grave is unmarked.

This first match was watched by a then record crowd for England's top division: 65,000. Arsenal were still known as and based at Woolwich Arsenal at the time but they had a huge away following for this match due to it also being the 66th birthday of King Edward VII. The munitions factory – where many of the workers who followed the club were based – was closed for the day, hence they were free to travel to West London.

In fact, Arsenal could have been more local rivals of Chelsea than Tottenham Hotspur. A local businessman – Henry Norris – had a significant role in the development of both clubs. Amassing a fortune from property Norris became a Director and then Chairman of Fulham. Another Edwardian businessman called Henry – Henry Augustus Mears – had acquired Stamford Bridge with a view to it becoming one of the finest venues for association football in the capital if not the whole country. He offered Norris the chance to move Fulham FC to the ground but Norris refused to pay the annual rent of some £ 1500 and so Mears created his own team – Chelsea FC – in 1905. Had Norris not been so careful with his money, there might not have been a Chelsea football club at all.

Five years later Norris, still Chairman of Fulham became a majority shareholder of Woolwich Arsenal which had gone into voluntary liquidation. Becoming Chairman of that London club too, Norris proposed merging them with Fulham to form a super-club. The move was blocked by the Football League and so Chelsea and Fulham remained local rivals rather than Chelsea and Arsenal.

This match between the two teams in 1907 was the first ever to be played by two London clubs in the First Division and so the first major 'London derby.' All subsequent league meetings between the two sides to date have been in the top tier of English football (the old First Division and now the Premier League).

Woolwich Arsenal got their revenge the following season with a 2.1 win on 28th November, 1908 – Chelsea's goal coming from George Hilsdon again. The Gunners won on Chelsea turf in the season after that as well, before the first draw – 1.1 – in this league fixture on 15th February, 1913. This was the last time the two sides met before Woolwich Arsenal moved to Highbury and changed their name to Arsenal.

Indeed, after that win in their first meeting, Chelsea did not win the fixture again until 13th December, 1919 when they won 3.1 with goals from Robert McNeil, John Cock and Henry Ford in front of a huge post-war crowd of 60,000.

The fixture on 12th October, 1935 was played in front of another enormous crowd: 82,905, which was the second highest recorded attendance for an English league match. It finished in a 1.1 draw. Joseph Bambrick scored for Chelsea and Jack Crayston for Arsenal.

Arsenal's record league win at Stamford Bridge came in front of 74,667 football fans on 29th November, 1930 – a 5.1 victory, with David Jack scoring a hat-trick as Arsenal moved closer to their first League Championship win and domination of English football in the 1930s . They scored five times again on 24th November, 1934 – in a 5.2 victory this time – with legendary Arsenal center-forward Ted Drake scoring four of Arsenal's goals. Drake would go on to manage Chelsea in 1952 and was largely responsible for changing their nickname from The Pensioners to The Blues .

The Gunners also scored five goals in a 5.3 win on 29th October, 2011 with Robin Van Persie scoring a hat-trick for the victors.

Chelsea's largest win in the fixture came in a 6.0 win in the Premier League on 22nd March, 2014 which was also Arsenal manager, Arsène Wenger's 1000th game in charge. This is the highest number of goals Chelsea have scored against Arsenal in a league fixture at Stamford Bridge and also represented the biggest margin of victory by The Blues. Oscar scored two goals that day alongside one each from Samuel Eto'o, Andre Schurrle, Eden Hazard and Mohamed Salah in front of an attendance of 41,614.

The sides are neck and neck in terms of wins in this fixture. In the years when Chelsea have gone on to win the League Title they have never lost at home to their rivals from North London, drawing the matches in the 1954/55 and 2004/05 seasons and winning each of them in 2005/06, 2009 / 10 and 2014/15.

For Arsenal, in the 13 seasons where they have finished as League Champions, they have only lost at Chelsea on two occasions (Chelsea were in the Second Division in the 1988/89 season so there was no fixture) – on 29th August, 1970 when Paddy Mulligan and John Hollins scored for Chelsea and Eddie Kelly got one back for Arsenal – and on 2nd February, 1991. Kerry Dixon and Graham Stuart scored for Chelsea that day with Alan Smith replying for Arsenal in front of a crowd of 29,094. This was the only league defeat of the season for George Graham's Arsenal team and their first in 27 First Division matches, stretching back to a 2.0 loss at Luton Town on 21st April, 1990.

Camisetas de fútbol , NBA y NFL baratas de la mejor calidad y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños. by Mark Rasdall