Learn More About NYC Tee Times

Anyone who is familiar with the history of the Big Apple knows that it was a seaport and commerce center long before it was anything else. The geography of NYC has also played a large part in how the city developed. In short, unlike Los Angeles – which didn't even exist when New York was a bustling business center and port of entry – anything that came along later had to adapt itself to what was already there.

Case in point – nyc golf courses. Unlike Los Angeles, which has 144 of them, there are only 19 nyc golf courses located within the five boroughs – and 18 of them are owned and operated by the City, meaning that they are owned by the public.

This is actually a good thing, because it means consistent greens fees throughout the city, which are significantly lower than those charged at the private country clubs outside the metro area. The fees for tee times at 17 of the nyc golf courses are established by the NYC Parks Foundation, and are all the same.

The one exception is Moshulu Driving Range in the Bronx, which has slightly different fee structures – which are still quite low for NYC residents with an annual permit (only $ 6 per year for adults). This is a nine-hole regulation course, par 35, with 3,253 yards. Weekend greens fees are only two dollars more on the weekend, and include the use of a golf cart if available.

The one remaining private driving range within the city is Chelsea Piers. These are located on actual piers in Manhattan and are unusual in that they offer "Simulator Sessions" – a form of technology that was science fiction only a quarter century ago. Those who have seen the science fiction movie Outland that starred Sean Connery may remember Peter Boyle playing virtual golf on a similar device, that at the time was a Hollywood illusion. That technology is now real and available at Chelsea Piers, one of the most technologically advanced nyc golf courses.

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Mastering Mathematics – Divisibility Rules

To master mathematics, you have to know the rules. The more tools you have in that tool shed, the more likely one will get the job done. Here, we explore divisibility properties for the numbers up to 11. Once you add these properties to your arsenal, you will be that much further along to mastering this most difficult subject.

Divisibility Tests for Numbers:

2: If the number is even, that is, if the number ends in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8, then that number is divisible by 2. Thus, 358 and 4,034,032 are divisible by 2.

3: If the sum of the digits of the number is divisible by 3, then the given number is also. Thus, 324 and 1,345,611 are both divisible by 3 since the sums of their digits, 9 and 21, respectively, are both divisible by 3.

4: If the last two digits of the number are divisible by 4, then so is the number. Thus, 312 and 1,024 are both divisible by 4.

5: If the number ends in 0 or 5, then the number is divisible by 5. Thus, 1,000 and 405 are both divisible by 5.

6: If a number is divisible by both 2 and 3, then the number is divisible by 6. You can test divisibility by 2 and 3 using the tests above. Once this is established, you are certain that the number is divisible by 6. Thus, 312 and 4,002 are both divisible by 6. Another way of saying this is if the number is even and the sum of the digits is divisible by 3, then the number is divisible by 6.

7: This rule is probably the most labor intensive of all. Yet, this rule works very well, especially when dealing with large numbers. Let us illustrate it with a specific example. Take the number 2,667. To determine whether this number is divisible by 7, we do the following: we take the last digit, namely 7, multiply it by 2 to get 14 and subtract this from the three digits, namely 266, that remain after we remove the 7. Thus 266 – 14 = 252. Repeat the procedure and we have 2×2 = 4; 25 – 4 = 21, and 21 is divisible by 7. Generally, repeat the procedure until you get to a number that is a few multiples of 7, so that you recognize the divisibility by this number.

8: If the last three digits form a number divisible by 8, then the entire number is divisible by 8. Thus, 4,096 and 1,016 are divisible by 8.

9: As with 3, if the sum of the digits forms a number divisible by 9, then the number is too. Thus, 108 and 3,240 are divisible by 9.

10: This is probably the easiest rule. Simply, if the number ends in 0, then it is divisible by 10.

11: If the alternate sum of the digits results in a number that is divisible by 11, including 0, then the entire number is divisible by 11. For example, take the number 5,082. Perform 5-0+8-2 = 11. Since 11 is divisible by 11, obviously, then the entire number is as well.

Learn these divisibility properties and I guarantee that your knowledge in and ability with mathematics will grow exponentially. For those parents who want their children to perform better in math, then see that your children master these rules. For then, the sky truly will be the limit.

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FC Barcelona Player Profiles – Eric Abidal

Eric Abidal was signed in the summer of 2007 as a replacement for Gio. While he is a natural left back, Abidal can also play as a center back when necessary with his combination of footballing skill, positioning and tactical awareness as well as his semi-legendary runs up the wing in support of the forwards.

Futbol Club Barcelona is Abidal's first team outside France and he arrived at the club after strong interest from Arsenal. Despite being pursued by Italian clubs also, he refused to move there because he feels the game in Italy is still too racist. His move to Barcelona is under a four year deal and on arrival in his new team was unable to assume is usual number 20 due to it already being worn by Deco and he wears 22 instead.

He moved from Olympique Lyon, who Barcelona have faced in the 2007-08 Champions League, with who he won the French league title on three occasions in a row (2004-5, 2005-6, 2006-7), as well as the French Cup of Champions twice (2004-5, 2005-6). As part of the deal to move to Barcelona, ​​Lyon will gain half a million Euros if the Catalan team win the Champions League in the next four years. Previous clubs also include Lyon-La-Duchere, Monaco and Lille.

The player, who is of Martinique decent, was considered one of the best fullbacks in the country and played for the French national squad on more than 20 occasions, including being part of the team that were runners up in the 2006 World Cup.

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Zinedine Zidane

Zinedine Zidane, the monk-like fantasista – heir to Platini's throne as France's greatest ever player, is also widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Maybe slightly overrated in some quarters when labelled with the 'Greatest Ever' tag, his achievements and trophy haul are certainly second to very few. For a time he was also the most expensive player in the world, costing Real Madrid a huge £ 46m. During his playing days Zidane became one of world football's true superstars, and much loved players – his global fan base was (and still is) exceptional. From Europe, to North Africa (the origin of his roots) and the Middle East, to Japan – Zidane, was the man.

Zidane was born to Algerian immigrants who firstly moved to Paris, but eventually settled in La Castellane – a suburb with a huge North African community in France's southern town of Marseille. It was here that Yazid Zidane was born in 1972. Yazid, his birth name, is what he was known by to his friends and family. The young Yazid looked to replicate his idol; Olympic Marseille's very own fantasista, Uruguayan Enzo Franchescoli, by teaching himself tricks and repetitively juggling a football until he was better than most of the boys in the area. In a neighborhood high in crime rate Zidane had to become tough, though this was mostly focused through Judo – something else he showed an early talent for. But it was football that won the youngsters heart. After school he would gather with the other boys from his tower block, in 'Place Tartane' – an 80 x 12 yard clearing in the middle of the housing complex, which served as a makeshift football pitch. By 13 years old his talent was such that he was spotted by a scout for Cannes who proclaimed: 'I've found a boy who has hands where his feet should be'. After initial scepticism he was allowed to join the club's 'center de formation', leaving home and his family in the process to lodge with a club director's family.

By 16 years old he was making his league debut versus Nantes. Then, playing the same opponents two years on, he scored his first senior league goal in a 2-1 win. Remembering the promise he made the young Zidane upon scoring his debut goal, the president rewarded him with a brand new Renault Clio. Unfortunately for the 20 year old Zizou, the Va Va Voom factor wore off pretty quick as Cannes were relegated the very next season. His skills didn't go unnoticed however and with an offer coming in from Bordeaux, Zidane moved South for approximately £ 300k, where he would be reunited with his junior international team mate and close friend Christophe Dugarry. They formed part of an exciting new team that made waves in Europe as well as at home, winning the Intertoto Cup in 1995 and finishing runners-up in the UEFA Cup. It was during this period he also made his national team debut in 1994, coming off the bench whilst France were 2-0 down against the Czech Republic, and scoring twice. The press went wild – the new Platini had arrived. People outside of France were now beginning to take notice of Zidane's attributes. The then Premiership Champions Blackburn Rovers coach Ray Harford expressed an interest in the midfielder, only for Blackburn's owner Jack Walker to refuse, famously stating: 'Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?'

Zizou was a relative late bloomer on the world stage. He was already aged 24 when gaining his first major move – Juventus paying a modest £ 3.2m in 1996 to take him from the Bordeaux side that had starred (particularly against AC Milan) in the previous seasons UEFA Cup. Juve had chosen to snap him up before the summer's Euro'96 competition in case of any value increase. But after his poor, lackluster performances during the tournament, they probably saw their new commodity depreciate in value – leading Juventus president Gianni Agnelli to cuttingly remark: 'is the real Zidane the one I've heard so much about, or the one I' ve been watching? ' To be fair to Zidane, he had just completed a mammoth 65-match season. Then on the eve of the Euros, he suffered a car crash. His arrival in Turin signalled more 'new Platini' comparisons. But after a difficult period of adjustment to the new league, murmurs of disappointment could be heard throughout the Juve faithful, leading Zidane to announce: 'I'm Zinedine Zidane and it's important that the fans understand that I can never be Platini, on or off the pitch. ' He was right. Zidane was a totally different character to the former Juventus number 10, and what's more that shirt at Juve now belonged to Del Piero. Zidane's squad number at La Vecchia Signora was 21 – an alien number to a fantasista, however after the frosty start in Turin his performances started to resemble a true fantasista. With winning goals against championship rivals Inter, and by helping Juve secure their second Intercontinental Cup in November versus River Plate, Zidane silenced his doubters. The win was made even sweeter for Zidane as he faced his teenage idol, Enzo Francescoli. The Uruguayan fantasista was ending his career back at the club where he had shot to fame. For Zidane, life couldn't get any better.

Only it could.

That trophy was the first major of his senior career and sparked a remarkable winning period which would see him collect nearly every major trophy the sport had to offer during an incredible career. His stay at the Turin giants saw him win the Scudetto twice, a UEFA Supercup and another Intertoto Cup. During the same period with France he collected the 1998 World Cup and then followed it up with the European Championship in 2000. The only major trophy which evaded him was the Champions League. He had finished runner-up twice with Juve and now it seemed like his Holy Grail. It was probably a major factor in his decision to leave Juventus in the summer of 2001, when Real Madrid came calling and splashed out a whopping £ 47m for his services. The Real president Florentino Perez was embarking on his first galactico project, signing the best players in the world. And at this time, nobody was better than Zidane, having also picked up the greatest accolades any individual player could win – the Ballon d'Or in 1998, and World Player of the Year in that same year, whilst also collecting it in 2000. In 1996 when he arrived at Juventus he may have been labeled as an inferior model to the great Platini, but in 2001 he was leaving having certainly surpassed him.

In Spain, Zidane won the watching Bernabeau faithful over instantly. They adored his velvet touch and instant control. His mastery over the ball reminded their older followers of their glorious players from the past – not least their greatest ever player, Alfredo Di Stefano, who's number 5 shirt Zidane now wore (the number 10 shirt was taken by Real's first galactico, Luis Figo) . The similarity would be greatly enhanced by the end of that season, when Zidane inspired Madrid to reach the European Cup final in Glasgow – scene of their infamous 7-3 victory in 1960 versus Eintracht Frankfurt from Germany. During that match the great Di Stefano was at the peak of his powers, scoring a hat-trick. Real's modern day number 5 couldn't quite emulate three goals, but scored what is considered the greatest goal in European Cup final history – a tremendous volley with his left foot (his wrong foot) from the edge of the penalty box, to lead Real to a 2-1 win over Bayer Laverkusen … from Germany. He had completed his Holy Grail.

Zidane won further trophy's whilst in Spain, adding a La Liga championship, a UEFA Supercup and another Intercontinental Cup to his now bursting trophy cabinet. He also claimed a third World Player of the Year award in 2003, making him the joint highest ever recipient (alongside Ronaldo).

Zizou was more than a collection of awards though. To watch him play during his peak was like watching the top ballet star perform, albeit in football boots, such was his elegance and technique when controlling and gliding with the ball. His signature move, the roulette, looked like a graceful pirouette performed in the middle of a clumsy mob, leaving his midfield markers dumfounded and kicking fresh air. His attributes led Michel Platini to observe: 'Technically, I think he is the king of what's fundamental in the game – control and passing. I don't think anyone can match him when it comes to controlling or receiving the ball. ' Brazilian coaching legend Carlos Alberto Parreira put it rather more bluntly, though non-the less complimentary, simply labeling him: 'a monster!'

Unlike many of the other legendary fantasisti, Zidane wasn't a great goalscorer, never reaching double figures in Italy or Spain. However, he was most definitely a scorer of great goals. More importantly he was a scorer of decisive goals in big games, especially on the international stage. He scored twice (two identical headers) in the 1998 World Cup final, when France beat Brazil 3-1 to win their first ever (and only) World Cup. During Euro 2000 he scored a sublime free-kick in the quarter-finals versus Spain, then, followed it up scoring a Golden Goal in the semi-final win versus Portugal. Euro 2004 saw a poor French performance but Zidane provided one of the highlights of the competition when scoring twice (a free-kick and a penalty) in injury time, turning a 1-0 defeat into a 2-1 victory versus England during the opening group game. Cementing his place as a legendary World Cup performer in 2006 Zidane scored the winner, another penalty versus Portugal in the semi-final. He then scored (another penalty) again in another World Cup final, giving France an early lead against Italy in what was his final match as a professional footballer (he had announced his retirement from the game before the tournament). Sadly for him, France lost that game. Even sadder was the fact that Zidane wasn't able to stay on the pitch until the final whistle – having received a red card. Unfortunately for Zizou, red cards also form part of his legend.

As a playmaker Zidane's expression was all in his creative flair and artistry. However, during his career he was no stranger to some unsavory incidents on the football pitch. Zidane was sent-off a massive 12 times during his career (including five times at Juventus and twice whilst at Real Madrid) – mostly for retaliation. These violent flashpoints were in direct contrast to his perceived cool persona as he glided around the field, though his brooding, often moody stare also served as a warning; he was a player who would not be bullied. His response to provocation was first noted during his younger days at Cannes. Whilst he never started any trouble, he knew how to take care of himself. As Richard Williams deftly puts it in his excellent book 'The Perfect 10', he would respond: 'in a way that might be expected from a boy formed in a tough quarter of a hard-nosed city, where an injury might be repaid with a headbutt '. Fast forward 18 years and Marco Materazzi was living testament that age had not mellowed Zidane's own sense of personal justice – a flying headbutt to the Italian's chest in response to alleged provocation during the 2006 World Cup final. His last act as a professional footballer.

Many forget however, that this was not Zizou's first red card during a World Cup tournament. Indeed during France's triumphant World Cup victory in 1998 it is very easy to forget, in all the hysteria of his two headed goals in the final, that he was briefly a French villain. During the second group game versus Saudi Arabia, the balding fantasista inexplicably lost his cool and stamped on the back of the Saudi captain whilst he was lay on the ground after a challenge. It left the watching world mystified, as this time Zidane's brand of personal justice seemed to come without any direct provocation. The French poster-boy was given a two match suspension, putting 'Les Bleus' campaign in jeopardy – the then captain Didier Deschamps summing up the nervous feeling of the nation: 'I know he's impulsive, but he's put us all at risk'. Indeed without Zidane, the French struggled (eventually winning) in their last-16 tie versus Paraguay – which is testament to the effect Zizou had on the national team. This would become a worrying noticeable feature of all the French teams for the next decade; such was Zidane's stature and ability. With him, they were world beaters, without him they looked also rans. During qualification for the 2006 finals, the French (without Zidane who had announced his international retirement in 2004) almost failed to qualify. Zidane (along with Thuram and Makelele) answered the call to help out his country and was immediately reinstated as captain. In doing so he instantly rejuvenated the French who went on to reach the (ill-fated) final of the tournament – along the way knocking out previous and future champions Brazil and Spain, with Zidane in imperious form and winning the competition's Most Valuable Player award .

So with this fantasista, we had the beauty and the beast. The grace and the violence. Taking the rough with the smooth, he was one hell of a player – maybe Parreira had described him best after all … he was a monster!

Bio

Born: 23rd June 1972 in Marseille (France)

Height: 1.85m / 6ft 1 ''

Career

1988-1992: Cannes – 61 apps / 6 goals

1992-1996: Bordeaux – 139 apps / 28 goals

1996-2001: Juventus – 151 apps / 24 goals

2001-2006: Real Madrid – 155 apps / 37 goals

Totals: 506 app / 95 goals

1994-2006: France – 108 caps / 31 goals

Honors

World Player of the Year: 1998, 2000, 2003

Ballon D'Or: 1998

FIFA World Cup: 1998

UEFA European Championship: 2000

UEFA Champions League: 2002

UEFA Supercup: 1996, 2002

Intercontinental Cup: 1996, 2002

Serie A Champions: 1997, 1998

La Liga Champions: 2003

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Derby Della Madonnina

Derby della Madonnina, as known as the Milan Derby between AC Milan and Internazionale, is one of the most high-tempered local derby in football world.

It is called «Derby della Madonnina» in honour of one of the main sights of the city of Milan, the statue of the virgin Mary – which is usually called «Madonnina.»

History and Rivalry

Milan were established in December 16, 1899 by former British vice-consul Alfred Edwards and were absorbed in nationalistic ideals which they wouldn’t allow any foreign player to become part of them.

In 1908, issues over the signing of foreign players kindled a rift inside the club and led to a split and the foundation of F.C. Internazionale Milano, which caused a historical rivalry between both clubs.

In the past, AC Milan was the working-class team and was supported mainly by workers and migrants from Southern Italy. Meanwhile, Inter was seen as the club of the Milan bourgeoisie, being of the property-owning class and exploitive of the working class.

However in the recent years this difference has broken down, since Milan is now owned by Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and Inter is owned by oil tycoon Massimo Moratti.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Milan derby saw the Dutch trio of Marco van Basten, Frank Rijkaard and Ruud Gullit played for AC Milan, while the German trio of Andreas Brehme, Jürgen Klinsmann and Lothar Matthäus wore the Inter colors.

This rivalry is mainly remembered for a famous 1990 World Cup incident, when Netherlands confronted Germany at the San Siro, home ground of Inter and Milan. The match ended in defeat for the Dutch as Rijkaard was saw red after spitting on German forward Rudi Völler. The Germans won 2-1 with two of the Inter players Klinsmann and Brehme scoring, a moral victory for Inter fans.

AC Milan, however, was the more dominant team both locally and internationally. They built a squad under Fabio Capello’s lead, later nicknamed as the invincibles, and reached the Champions League final three times in a row

On the other hand, Inter’s drought for a major title – their last major title was 1989 scudetto – ended in 2006 when the Calciopoli scandal stripped Juventus of the 2005-06 scudetto and handed it to the Nerazzurri. They has since clinched the 2007 Serie A title as well, with a record-breaking run of 17 consecutive victories.

The Most Infamous Match

It must be the second leg of the 2004/05 UEFA Champions League semifinal on April 12, 2005.

Milan were leading 1-0 (and 3-0 on aggregate) when Inter’s supporters became infuriated after a second-half Esteban Cambiasso leveler was controversially denied by referee Markus Merk.

Bottles and coins were thrown onto the pitch, but soon increased to lit flares and Milan keeper Dida, who was clearing bottles in order to take a goal kick, was hit by a flare on the back of his right shoulder.

The match was halted at the 74th minute and restarted after a thirty-minute delay. However, Dida was unable to continue, suffered bruising and first-degree burns to his shoulder, and was substituted by Christian Abbiati.

But the match was finally abandoned in less than a minute after more flares and debris rained down. AC Milan was awarded a 3-0 victory, totaling a 5-0 aggregate and moved to the final.

Meanwhile, Inter were fined ¬200,000 – the largest fine ever handed down by UEFA – and were ordered to play their first four Champions League matches behind closed doors in the 2005-06 season as punishment.

The Crossovers

Even though Derby della Madonnina is one of the most raging derby in Italy, but surprisingly both clubs do not forbid players exchange between them.

AC Milan players such as Andrea Pirlo, Clarence Seedorf, Dario Simic and Giuseppe Favalli, all were played for Inter.

While Hernan Crespo is a former Rossoneri player in 2004/05 season. Patrick Vieira is also had a brief spell in 1995-96 with AC Milan, which he made only two Serie A appearances before moving to Arsenal.

AC Milan – Inter Milan players exchange during last decade:

2007/08: –

2006/07: Giuseppe Favalli Inter –> Milan

2005/06: Christian Vieri Inter –> Milan

2004/05: Paolo Sammarco Inter –> Milan

2003/04: Andres Guglielminpietro Milan –> Inter

2002/03: Thomas Helveg Milan –> Inter

Francesco Coco Milan –> Inter

Umit Davala Milan –> Inter

Clarence Seedorf Inter –> Milan

Dario Simic Inter –> Milan

2001/02: Andrea Pirlo Inter –> Milan

Cristian Brocchi Inter –> Milan

2000/01: –

1999/00: Giorgio Frezzolini Milan –> Inter

Taribo West Inter –> Milan

1998/99: Maurizio Ganz Inter –> Milan

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New Hopes? Guardiola To Lead Barca

One of the oldest and most well-known football clubs in the history of the sport; the FC Barcelona has been struggling over the past seasons in the Spanish first division in order to get back on track. It has definitely been a bumpy ride for the Catalan group as many of its football have began to diminish their usual shine; either due to injuries or constant internal affairs that do not seem to reconcile.

However, the Barça continues to be an European football powerhouse with 18 Liga titles, 7 Spain Supercopa, 2 UEFA Championship League, 24 Copa del Rey and 2 European Super Cups as background. The team draws large amounts of followers due to the magnificent play display and its football players who make the show worth seeing; players such as: Samuel Eto'o, Xavi, Ronaldinho, Gianluca Zambrotta, Thierry Henry, Lionel Messi, and Rafael Márquez have supported the Spanish team for the recent era.

As of 2003 the Spanish club hired former AC Milan and Dutch star Frank Rijkaard to lead the club and during his first season the Barcelona obtained the Liga championship besides the Super Copa and one of the most incredible accomplishments a UEFA Champions League title which ended the team's drought of 14 years.

Most recently during the 2006-07 season the Barcelona began to show some signs of weakness as the club finished second in the Liga and were not able to conquer any other European tournament. Therefore; the team's leaders decided it was time for a major change as they have asked Rijkaard to step down.

"Joan Laporta [FC Barcelona President] has announced that Frank Rijkaard will end his career at the club at the end of this current 2007/08 season. Josep Buardiola, current coach of Barça B, has been picked as his replacement on the bench of FC Barcelona. "After a meeting of the Board of Directors, the president Joan Laporta appeared before the media to announce the takeover on the bench of the first team of FC Barcelona at the end of the season. On June 30, Frank Rijkaard will no longer be coach of FC Barcelona and Josep Guardiola will be his replacement. "

The announcement has left many questions as what exactly happened in the club's locker room as despite the Dutch Coach's success his leave has become a need. Many have stated the real reason is the players themselves who don't count with the proper encouragements and a positive attitude besides the obvious disagreements between the club and some of their super stars as Ronaldihno and Thierry Henry. Others claim that two years without a title is a clear sign it is time for a new approach in order to shift the future.

On the other hand, new coach Guardiola who will take over from the beginning of the new football season was leading the FC Barcelona B team since 2007 and he has a vast knowledge in the sport as he is a former Al Ahly of Qatar, Brescia, AS Roma, and Mexico's Dorados player. We certainly hope to see an improvement in the team's play and attitude as it has everything required to be one of Spain's top winners and achieve a new title during the 2008-09 campaign.

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The 3 Biggest Names This World Cup

Are you totally ignorant about football? Know nothing about the beautiful game? With the 2010 Fifa World Cup just round the corner, here you 3 of the biggest names on show. Learn them and not be left out of the conversation.

1) Lionel Messi

Lionel Messi is the 2009 European and World Footballer of the Year and one of the most skillful footballers in the world. Only 22, his dribbling skills have earned him comparisons with the great Diego Maradona. Messi has just completed a fantastic season for Barcelona, helping them retain the league title. Many fans feel that it’s a matter of time before Messi is elevated to the true greats of football, joining the likes of Pele and Maradona. However, in order to reach such heights, Messi must first win the World Cup. Will he be able to do so in South Africa this June? Messi has never been able to replicate his form for Argentina but is well poised to do so in the grandest stage of all.

2) Cristiano Ronaldo

Love him or hate him, Cristiano Ronaldo is one of the most well known footballers today. Ronaldo shot to fame with his transfer to Manchester United in 2003 and won the coveted Champions League with the Red Devils in 2008. A dazzling dribber, Ronaldo is also an accomplished scorer and header of the ball. The 2009 World Player of the Year, Ronaldo moved to Real Madrid in 2009 for a world record 80 million pounds and narrowly missed out on the league title with his new club. The biggest star in a skill Portuguese team, Ronaldo is already assured of his place as one of the greatest footballers of all time.

3) Wayne Rooney

Wayne Rooney, only 24, is England’s biggest star. His rise has been meteoric, becoming the youngest player to score in the Premier League in 2002, breaking Arsenal’s then unbeaten spell. His subsequent transfer from Everton to Manchester United has seen him pick up numerous accolades such as the 2010 Players’ Player of the Year. Known for this aggressive running and never say die attitude, Rooney has had his best season so far and is so important to England that then manager Sven Goran Eriksson took him to the 2006 World Cup even though he wasn’t fully fit. Having tarnished his last World Cup appearance by getting sent off against Portugal for a stamp on Ricardo Carvalho, Rooney has improved his temperament and is in good form for the World Cup.

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Roger Cruz