Burnley – Lancashire – Facts About the Town

The large town of Burnley – Lancashire is located in the Burnley borough in Lancanshire, England. The big market town has a large population, over 73, 000 residents. The town is situated 18 kilometers away from the eastern side of Blackburn and 40 kilometers away from the eastern side of Preston. The town is just on the meeting point of the River Brun and River Calder. The name Burnley is translated to "meadow by the River Brun". The existence of the town has been traced back to the early medieval times. During this time, it was just a small town with a marketplace.

The Industrial Revolution saw the development and expansion of the town into a big marketplace. It earned a reputation as a major center for cotton cloth production. Business was booming and many factories were operational. The face of the town as an industrial area is changing. Nowadays, the town serves as a satellite town for major cities like Leeds and Manchester. It is also a relief center to the M65 transit. It is hard to imagine that a town that was once a catalyst of the Industrial Revolution is now employing more people in the public sector than in the industrial sector.

The origin of Burnley can be traced back to prehistoric times. Archeological artefacts like Stone Age flint tools and weapons have been discovered in some parts of the town. These were found in the moors. Angles might have occupied this place in the 7th century. Angle names like Habergham and Padiham can be found in Burnley. Records of the early settlement by the Angles are not available, but as from 1122, records were available. One record involves the handing over of the Burnley church to the Ponterfract Abbey monks.

Burnley started as a small community, with farming being the main activity. Farming tools such as corn mill were in use in the 1290s. Asmall market was established in 1294, followed by a fulling mill in 1296. A big settlement started in the manor of Ightenhill. It exceeded 50 family units by that time. Other four manners were in existence as well, as part of the Clitheroe Honor.

Small remnants of early Burnley can be seen today. One of these is the Market Cross built around 1295. The Burnley cross can be seen in the premises of the Burnley College.

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5 Players Who Went From Starters to Bench-Warmers in the Premier League

Sometimes, even the most talented of footballers can face difficult obstacles in their lives. Despite being better than most other players in the Premier League, these footballers find themselves warming the bench for some really big clubs even after having given their best in the past.

There are several players in the Premier League who had joined big clubs in hope of finding regular first team football but end up playing second fiddles to the manager’s favourites. Some of the players on this list are barely 30 and yet have to sit on the sidelines despite being completely able to change the game for their sides.

Let’s take a look at 5 such players in the Premier League who went from starters to benchwarmers

Olivier Giroud:

The dynamic French striker is arguably one of the most underrated strikers in the Premier League. Despite consistently scoring goals for Arsenal since his arrival back in 2012, Giroud has lost his place in Wenger’s first to Alexandre Lacazette. The former Lyon striker is now Arsenal’s first choice striker after signing him from Lyon earlier this summer for close to £50 million. However, one can never count out Giroud from challenging Lacazette as he has shown in the past. It won’t be a surprise if Giroud manages to fight his way back into the Gunner’s starting XI in the coming weeks.

Wilfried Bony:

The 28-year-old Ivory Coast striker was leading the score sheets for Swansea City before joining Manchester City on a £25 million deal back in 2014. A lot was expected from the Bony that seasons but he could barely manage to outclass Sergio Aguero in his limited appearances for the Sky Blues. The arrival of Pep Guardiola last summer completely killed off any chances of making a comeback into the first team. Although, Bony could now get back to his best after joining his former club Swansea in the summer.

Michy Batshuayi:

The 23-year-old Belgium international striker enjoyed a brilliant first season at Chelsea, having won the Premier League in his first appearance in the Premier League. Batshuayi was brought in from Marseille after two impressive seasons in front of goal as a regular starter. But, with Antonio Conte having brought in Alvaro Morata this summer for a record fee, Batshuayi is now playing second fiddle to the highly rated Spanish striker. Batshuayi is definitely not a player who should be warming benches especially after winning the League.

Sergio Aguero:

The Argentine international striker is perhaps the best Non-English striker that the Premier League has ever seen. The 29-year-old target man had fired Manchester City to two Premier League titles in the past and is one of the most consistent goal scorers in Europe with 170 goals in 255 appearances for Manchester City. Despite his incredible stats, City’s new manager, Pep Guardiola has not yet chosen Aguero to be his leading striker having brought in 20-year-old Brazilian striker Gabriel Jesus in January last season.

Guardiola started Jesus over Aguero quite a few times in the Premier League last season and is planning to more of the same this season. Aguero is definitely not the kind of player any team would want on their bench. While it’s surprising to see Guardiola’s plans for him, his age could also be a factor but not that it has ever a matter concern for the Argentine.

Daniel Sturridge:

The England international might not be the most physically fit strikers in the Premier League but he certainly one of the most talented ones. Sturridge has always had a bad history of injuries and has not quite managed to repeat the same form he had shown playing alongside Luis Suarez back in 2013/14 season. Despite being fit and looking in the best shape of his career this season, Jurgen Klopp has chosen Roberto Firmino as his leading striker in the team. Only 28, and at the peak of his career, Sturridge certainly does not deserve to be warming the bench at Liverpool.

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Aaron Cresswell Overlooked for Country, Due to His Club?

How long can England ignore Aaron Cresswell because of the kit he wears?

Aaron Cresswell has been one of West Hams most consistent players, in one of their best ever seasons; definitely their best since the days of Mcavennie, Devonshire and Bonds at least. Ironically two of those players were also overlooked for England, whilst widely regarded as top quality players, in the prime of their careers.

Roy Hodgson has capped more débutantes for his country, than any other England manager in the past. Yet Cresswell cannot get a look in, even though he has been, arguably, the best performing English Left Back throughout the last two seasons in the Premier League. Perhaps even more importantly than his form, is that he has been a virtual ever-present for his club, chalking up a lot more game time than other candidates.

Players who perform week-in, week-out, are not getting selected, yet those who are used as squad rotation at the likes of Liverpool and Manchester United are being handed international starts on a regular basis. This appears to be on the merits of the club they represent, rather than what they put in on the pitch.

Cresswell is not an ‘academy graduate’ who was scouted for a top club and had to time to ply his trade in friendlies and reserve team matches, he had to graft and scrap his way through the lower leagues starting with Tranmere Rovers, before his subsequent moves to Ipswich Town and West Ham United – he knows how to work hard in order to garner success.

With Ashley Cole gone and Leighton Baines not getting any younger, Luke Shaw yet to recover from that horrific leg break – why is Aaron Cresswell still being overlooked? He has all the credentials required;

  • He is young enough to be blooded for the future, but old enough to have valuable experience.
  • He plays for a team competing with the big boys and looking to qualify for European football, for the second season in a row.
  • He has proven he is a hard-working professional who does not shirk responsibilities, or fail to track back when an attack breaks down.
  • He has shown his flair going forward with a number of wonderful strikes this season (Aston Villa and Leicester both spring to mind).

Does he need to move to a club lower down the table than West Ham? Such as Chelsea, Liverpool, Everton or Southampton, in order to break into the England squad?

Liverpool are reported to be interested in the young left back, so would he need to move to back to his home city, and play at Anfield; warming the bench for a side he has beaten three times this season, in order to play for his country?

That seems somewhat unreasonable to me!

My biggest concern is that players will move to clubs and rot on benches in an effort to represent their countries, thus leaving us with an international team full of people who do not regularly complete 90 minutes of competitive football. Surely that will have a detrimental effort on the sides results?

Aristotle said that; «The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.». This seems to apply on a domestic level, you need look no further than Claudio ‘the Tinkerman’ Ranieri and his band of ‘journeymen’ on the verge of Premier League Glory (and not by chance, deservedly so, in every way, shape and form), whilst Chelsea and their £400 million squad languish in middle table obscurity.

Internationally, the same should surely apply? Football does not stop being a TEAM game, because it is played under a different banner. The principles are the same, and we, as a nation, seem set on picking the best individuals, or the most expensive signings, rather than the players who function better in practicality, ultimately; football, is played on grass, not paper.

Perhaps I am just being negative, but I am searching for the reason that we have had so many ‘world class’ players over the years, and still failed to achieve anything – since that famous night at Wembley half a century ago.

Perhaps we are playing the wrong players, perhaps we are playing the right ones, and they are simply not good enough.

I am a firm believer in playing the players that are right for the team, people who will work hard for one another, and those full of passion and the desire to succeed – everything I have seen of Aaron Cresswell shows me he has those attributes, in abundance, and the talent to go with it.

Put him in the squad, pick him for a friendly, take him alongside another left back to the Euros, take a gamble, but do it soon – before another Englishmen ends up on a; «Best players not to be capped for England» list.

I would be interested in hearing anyone’s opinions on this, let us know how you feel about Roy Hodgsons selections, or Aaron Cresswells claim to a spot. You can get us in the comments section here, or over on Twitter @BeautifulDebate.

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