Paul McCartney – The Beatles – A Biography

James Paul McCartney was born on June 18, 1942 in Liverpool. He was the first son of Mary and James McCartney. His brother, Peter Michael McCartney, was born eighteen months later. Paul’s mother was a midwife, who died from breast cancer in 1955 when Paul was just 14, this troubled Paul deeply. Paul’s father was a cotton salesman during the day for A. Hannay Co., and a jazz musician with Jim Mac’s Jazz Band at night. Paul did very well in school. He passed his 11-Plus examination in 1957 and entered the Liverpool Institute, a very popular high school. There, he met a younger student by the name of George Harrison whom Paul later brought with him into John’s group, The Quarrymen. As a child, Paul showed no particular interest in music. Both he and his brother were sent to piano lessons, but these didn’t last long. Then he was given a trumpet by an uncle, and he began to teach himself. His musical talent probably came from his father. Of all The Beatles, Paul’s family was the only one with any musical background or interest. At the Liverpool Institute, Paul became popular. His dealings with young girls, however, had little effect on his grades. He was a top student, but he soon found that school was interfering with his social life. Like John and the others, Paul was influenced by early rock songs. Still, it was Elvis that formed the greatest impression on him. Paul first met John through a mutual friend, Ivan Vaughan. Vaughan invited Paul to see The Quarrymen play at the Wooton Parish. c The Quarrymen, and Paul accepted. Paul’s first public performance with The Quarrymen was at a dance at the Conservative Club in Broadway. Paul was supposed to play a solo that night, but for some reason, he never did. What he did do after the dance was play John some songs that he had written himself. John was impressed and later tried to write songs of his own. Neither wrote anything of much value, but the two began collaborating, each egging the other on to better works. From that day until the end of The Beatles, they never stopped, and together they became «Lennon & McCartney,» one of the most renowned song writing duos of the twentieth century. Once they had become established songwriters, Paul and John would often write independently of one another. John’s songs were more raw rock ‘n’ roll, while Paul’s tended to be more romantic. Songs like «Yesterday,» «Michelle,» and «Lovely Rita» are typical McCartney songs. An early agreement between Paul and John assured that all Beatle songs that either wrote would bear the trademark of «Lennon & McCartney.» Paul met Jane Asher at a pop concert at Albert Hall. She was then seventeen. The Radio Times asked her to go along to the concert to give her impressions of The Beatles. After the concert, she was invited back to their hotel for a drink. That night Paul and Jane spent the evening together. «I realized she was the girl for me,» Paul once said. Jane, however, summed up her impression of the boys by exclaiming, «They couldn’t believe I was a virgin. » Paul wanted Jane to give up acting to be with him constantly. She refused. This led to a number of arguments, but Paul was still attracted to her. It was for Jane Asher that he wrote «I’m Looking Through You» and «And I Love Her.» Marriage seemed inevitable, and on Christmas Day, 1967, Paul asked Jane to be his wife. She accepted (Bio..)(Paul Mc…)

In 1969 rumors started to spread that Paul was dead. Rumors of the death were exaggerated. No one knows for sure where the «Paul is Dead» rumor began. Some rumors were spread that Paul had been dead for three years and that he had been replaced by a look a like. Beatles fans everywhere looked for clues that were left intentionally in lyrics, record covers and pictures that would reveal the truth about the hoax.

The idea that Paul McCartney was dead for three years surfaced during the release of Abbey Road in September of 1969. The first indications of the hoax were printed in two Midwestern College newspapers (Iowa’s Drake University Times-Delphic and Northern Illinois University’s Northern Star). Russel Gibb, a Detroit radio jock for WKNR FM read about the story in the college newspaper articles and invented new «clues» for listeners. Listeners called the radio station and claimed to be able to hear secret messages by playing Revolution #9 and other songs backwards. A walrus is a Greek symbol for death. In the song Glass Onion, John Lennon sings, «well here’s another clues for you all, the walrus is Paul,» which connected Paul to his «death».

According to one myth. Paul left the recording studio in anger, following a fight with the rest of the group. Paul stormed out of the studio, jumped into his car and sped off (I Buried P…). All of the clues point to a car accident that reportedly happened prior to Paul leaving the studio in anger. On November 10, 1966 a British newspaper reported that on Wednesday morning at five o’clock someone was involved in a car accident, according to the newspaper the accident was so bad that the body could not be identified in any way. In A Day In The Life, John Lennon sings, «he blew his mind out in a car, he didn’t notice that the light had changed, a crowd of people stood and stared, they’d seen his face before, nobody was really sure if he was from the house of god (in the song god sounds like Paul)(I Buried P…)

Many visual clues were on the Abbey Road LP. The media began reporting the joke as a fact as soon as it was released. The rumors began to grow larger. In October of 1969 McCartney himself made a public appearance in which he stated the breaking up of The Beatles. In a 1970 Rolling Stone interview with John Lennon, Lennon was asked if any of the hidden clues were supposed to have any meaning. Lennon replied, «No. That was bull. The whole thing was made up.»

The Beatles enjoyed attention. They were jokers; maybe they were just having a little fun with their fans. Some people today still believe that Paul is dead because of the many convincing clues. No evidence shows that any of the members were behind the hoax. No one can prove that it did or didn’t happen. The fact of the matter is that Paul is alive today. He is currently married to an ex-model. He is touring the concert world. And he is still a Living legend.

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X Factor 3 Preview – Raymond Quinn

Raymond Quinn

Manager – Simon Cowell

Odds – 14/1 (Outright), 5/1 (16-24 Winner)

Raymond Quinn is an 18 year old student from Liverpool and almost didn't make it to the final 12 of the X Factor. On the second day of Bootcamp Raymond sang 'Easy' by The Commodores and while Simon Cowell and Sinitta agreed he was a 'cheeky and likeable' contestant they were not sure about his credentials and initially told him 'no'.

However at the end of the second day, as Raymond was about to leave, Simon decided he had made a mistake in letting him go and after talking to the executive producers of the show he called Raymond back to tell him 'Raymond, I made a mistake, I want you to come to my home visit '.

Raymond lives at home with his parents in Liverpool and he has two older brothers who own a carpet warehouse. He describes his girlfriend of one year Kirsty as his closest friend.

He is currently studying performing arts at The Merseyside Dance and Drama College and during his stay there has had some vocal training and has learnt to dance to an advanced level.

Sharp eyed viewers may remember Raymond as' Anthony Murray 'in defunct soap Brookside, a role which earned him a Soap Award in 2002 for' Best Dramatic Performance 'and the story in which he killed a girl who was bullying him won' Best Storyline of 2003 '.

'To win that accolade at such a young age was an amazing experience' said Ray, 'being in Brookside was the only job I've ever had and it was the best one'.

After finishing with acting, Ray was unsure of what to do with his life, so two years ago began singing lessons and found he really enjoyed it.

One of his proudest moments is winning £ 5000 prize money in Manchester based talent competition 'Search for a Star' and performing in Liverpool's Philharmonic Hall for a Tsunami Aid concert.

On the first day of the X Factor auditions Raymond sang Dean Martin's 'Ain't That A Kick In The Head' and 'Devil In Disguise' by Elvis Presley. All the judges were impressed with him and Simon Cowell descrived him as 'a young Robbie (Williams)'. Louis Walsh thought he had 'great potential' while Sharon Osbourne said he was a 'natural' and told him 'I love you Raymond'.

Raymond decided to stick with what he knew at Bootcamp and performed 'Devil in Disguise'. This time Simon thought he was 'a bit stage school' but also thought he was 'cheeky' and 'has charisma'.

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The Geography of Liverpool

On a world map the co-ordinates for the city of Liverpool are 53o latitude north and longitude 3o west. Liverpool is a metropolitan borough of Merseyside and a unitary authority in its own right. However, it also still retains historic links with the county of Lancashire, to which it was once part of. The Merseyside metropolis derives its name from the River Mersey and encompasses the cities and towns along its banks, estuary and hinterland. Liverpool is on the eastern bank of the River Mersey and is the fifth largest in England, with a population exceeding 440,000 in an area of around 11100 hectares. The population density in Liverpool is about 40 per hectare.

It has been established that there were settlements along the banks of the River Mersey, in the area we now know as Liverpool, dating back to the 1st century AD. These settlements would have been small fishing communities which, over the centuries, amalgamated into a heavily urbanised area by as early as the 12th century. The surface geology of Liverpool is rarely more than 10 metres thick and is a pebbly silty clay, with some sand and gravel deposits, which were all laid down by the retreating glaciers during the last ice age. The dominant bedrock in Liverpool is sandstone that was laid down in the Triassic era around 250 million years ago. To the west, the city also borders on to Carboniferous shale, mudstone and sandstone deposits as well as the Lancashire Coalfield deposits. At one time the coal deposits were workable but now, with most of the remaining deposits being below 1200m they are deemed unviable economically. However, the potential of coal bed Methane as a source of potentially clean energy is being studied, which might result in the coal deposits having a further use. In the early 1990s an oil and gas field was discovered in Liverpool Bay, out beyond The Wirral. Capable of producing 10 million cubic metres of gas and 70,000 barrels of oil a day, the field is now economically important to the area with an annual turnover exceeding £60 million. With supplies of sand, gravel and clay all available locally the traditional building materials used in Liverpool have been moulded bricks and clay tiles for roofing.

Liverpool technically extends along 21km of the east bank of the River Mersey estuary, rather than being on a river that actually flows through it. The Mersey is formed at the confluence of the River Tame and the River Goyt at Stockport in Lancashire. The famed Manchester Ship Canal joins the river at Eastham Locks and was the route by which imported cotton into the port at Liverpool was transferred to Manchester and the other weaving towns of Lancashire. Although the city of Liverpool has developed around a ridge of seven distinct hills the land rarely rises above 50m, with the highest point being at Everton Hill, 70m.

The climate in Liverpool is typical of England being a temperate one. With most of its weather systems arriving on the prevailing westerly winds, the average temperature in January is 50C and July it is 150C. On average Liverpool receives less than 750ml of rainfall a year which, considering its location on the west coast of England is surprising. However, the landmass of Ireland, to the west, absorbs much of the rainfall coming off the Atlantic Ocean that would otherwise fall on Liverpool. The average expectancy of rain in Liverpool is about 175 days a year. The temperature in January is higher than might be expected for a city in the north of England. This is because the city, and its port, benefit from the blanket effect of the North Atlantic Drift.

For many years Liverpool was seen as an economically depressed area with a stock of low cost and poor quality housing. The recent regeneration of the city has seen the price of the city’s housing stock rise by up to 15% a year over the last 10 years. Currently house prices in Liverpool fluctuate compared to regional and national trends depending on the type of property, but the housing market here is a buoyant one. In early 2007, a semi-detached 3 bedroom house in Liverpool on average cost £155,000, which was the same as the regional average but lower than the national average, which was £185,000. At £290,000 the average price of a typical 4 bed-roomed detached house in Liverpool is again about the same as the regional average but nearly 10% below the national average. A two bed-roomed terraced house in Liverpool will cost about £100,000, which is again about the regional average but almost 20% below the national average. The average regional value of a two bed roomed flat is £115,000 whereas In Liverpool it is £150,000 a figure which is also slightly higher than the national average.

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Ronaldo – Slave or Hero?

Apparently Ronaldo is being treated like ‘a modern day slave’ according to FIFA President Sepp Blatter. Manchester United’s refusal to allow Ronaldo to leave for Real Madrid is tantamount to slavery.

And he believes Manchester United and Real Madrid should» sit together» if Ronaldo wants a move to the Spanish club.

«If the player wants to play somewhere else, then a solution should be found,» commented Blatter.

«Because if he stays in a club where he does not feel comfortable to play then it’s no good for the player and for the club.

«I’m always in favour to protect the player and if the player wants to leave, let him leave.»

Whilst Blatter has a point in that it is pointless trying to keep a player tied to a club if he wants to leave, comparing such players to ‘modern day slaves’ is an insult to those people who really are ‘modern day slaves’. Ronaldo ,football genius he is, earns more in a week than children in Asia will earn in a lifetime, he lives in mansions, wears the best clothes, drives the best cars, holidays in the best hotels. Real ‘modern day slaves’ do not have enough to eat, live in houses without sanitation or water or electricity – in my view Blatter pampered and spoiled bureaucrat that he is should think about what he is saying and try to be a little more thoughtful in his responses.

And anyway what about loyalty- should Ronaldo not have some measure of loyalty to the club that has helped bring him universal acclaim? Is there no loyalty in football any more or merely a wish for more and more money and prizes? So will Ronaldo stop playing if he is forced to stay at Manchester United or will he display a new maturity and still play at his peak?

On the subject of slaves are not 90% of the population who work in normal jobs, who are not fortunate enough to possess genius or the adulation of millions slaves also?

What do you think?

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