Gifts That Relive the Glorious Moments of the Club

Are you a great fan of Chelsea football club? Do you desire to own something authentic related to the club? Relive the proud history of Chelsea football club and own genuine gifts by considering the Chelsea Football Gifts. The gifts come with the certificate of originality.

The Chelsea football gifts are a collection of Chelsea Football Books, Chelsea Signed Memorabilia, Chelsea Framed Photos and Montages, and Chelsea Framed Stadium Photos. Chelsea Football Newspaper Book is a collection of interesting facts from the early 20th century to the recent bygone matches. This gift depicts the events and incidents that have brought glory to the club. The newspaper memorabilia is bound in a beautiful burgundy leatherette binder gold embossed with option to engrave the recipient’s name. The newspaper book let the readers have a vivid insight of all the historically significant incidents. The reports are written by persons who have witnessed by persons and not by individuals looking back in time. It also covers the top stories and vital matches of the club. This is a precious collection of Chelsea Football Gifts.

Chelsea signed memorabilia offers you some of the rare and genuine items. The items include shirts, photos and montages of the legendary players. This category of Chelsea Football Gifts are worthy because they are personally autographed by the celebrated players. The collection is presented in attractive frames and free from watermarks. They are exclusive and are limited in edition. For example: Chelsea Squad Signed Photo

The collection of Chelsea football gifts is an effort to reminiscence the golden moments. Chelsea Football club is a renowned professional football club that have won FA Cup, the League Cup and UEFA Cup Winner’s cup. The Chelsea football gifts commemorate the players who have dedicated their lives in bringing glory to the club. Thus, for any Chelsea football nut this unique collection is worthwhile.

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On Being a Fan – Why I Love West Bromwich Albion

I don’t really remember when I first became aware of football as a kid. It was just always there. Every scrap of wasteland was a pitch, every battered can a ball. WBA, Wolves and Villa graffiti was daubed on every pub car park wall and slashed into most of the red leather bus seats of the Midland Red fleet. In the Black Country, the heavily industrialised core of the West Midlands, football is totally tribal.

West Bromwich Albion were formed in 1880, one of the founder clubs of the first ever Football League, starting as the West Bromwich Strollers in 1878 formed by a dedicated group of manufacturing workers at the Salter Spring Works in West Bromwich. The club roots are therefore firmly knotted into the industrial heritage of the area and in its early years, workers from nearby heavy industry would flood through the turnstiles of the Hawthorns, their heavy industrial protective clothing giving rise to «the Baggies» tag which has been long used to refer to the club as well as the fans.

For me, football dominated childhood Saturdays during the season and talk was always of Albion. Legendary names like Jeff Astle and Ronnie Allen were as familiar as any other in the streets where I grew up. Our road was an ‘Albion road’ and all the scarves were navy and white. On home game Saturdays, garage doors would rise in unison and Ford Cortinas and Escorts would be reversed in formation before the mass driving over to West Bromwich to the ground we Albion fans now call «The Shrine.» Even to this day, 30 odd years later, the sight of those Hawthorns’ floodlights still send a shiver down my spine, sending me hurtling back to the days when the team ran out to the old reggae tune ‘The Liquidator’ by the Harry J Allstars and Bryan Robson wore the Captain’s no 7 shirt.

West Brom in the veins. That’s how it always been. The emotional attachment you feel to your local football club especially when its been handed down the family line is hard to explain to non-fans, but you can never walk away and my God at times you want to run. Supporting «The Baggies» is not for the lily-livered. You have to be stoical, very stoical.

Albion are as big a part of my family as any of us. Dad and Grandad were big Albion fans and this was passed to me and my brother like the family name via striped DNA. At games today, I often think about Dad, back in the 50s, sat on the railway sleepers that were wedged into the bank that is now the Birmingham «Brummie» Road End watching his beloved Throstles after leaving his bike down «someone’s entry» close to the ground. And then there’s my much beloved Grandad, Daniel Nock, long gone, who stood opposite where I sit now, in flat cap and rainmac, cigar in hand at the Hawthorns of the 60s when Albion flew high, winning the League Cup in ’66 and the FA Cup in ’68. The ground gives me the strangest feeling of being ‘at home’ it sounds corny but its true. For me, there is something very special about that place and I know that essential feeling won’t fade.

When I was growing up, football was everything and everywhere. Saturday afternoons were spent at my Nan and Grandad’s in Blackheath. Nan and I would listen to the match on the radio, waiting for Dad, Grandad, my brother and champion onion growing twin neighbours Ernie and Ivan, to return from the match. If we won, and in the late 70s this was more often than not, Grandad would come charging through the back door armed with chips and tales of my childhood hero Cyrille Regis and total Albion legend Tony ‘Bomber’ Brown. These were the days when I was told I was too young to go and Dad forbid it absolutely. I therefore had to rely on my brother’s tales of his experiences of the Smethwick End stand. Stories which I held in awe, tales of the crush of the terraces and the sporadic violence that by then was rising in the English game, of bricks and coins being thrown across thinly segregated fans.

In the late 1970s, West Brom were quite the golden team and this was a great time to be a fan, a welcome distraction for many from the pains of a severe economic depression that was hitting the Black Country hard, with the old steel and manufacturing industries that had propped up our communities for a century or more, beginning to falter and break down. Football took on an even stronger role for local people needing a focus and an escape.

In 1979, WBA finished third in the Old Division 1 and qualified for European football. This was the flair team still feted by fans today and only in the last two seasons have we seen (with some joy) an Albion side rise to anywhere near their level. Albion then fielded three black players in the same team, something that was then totally unknown in English football – Cyrille Regis, Brendon Batson and the wonderfully gifted, sadly late, Laurie Cunningham. These incredibly talented footballers became known to fans as ‘The Three Degrees’ and acted as pioneers of black players in football, inspiring a generation.

Cyrille was and still is a tower of a man and is still hugely loved and admired by Albion fans. A superbly strong, powerful player, he was to become for many the true benchmark of everything a centre forward should be. Brave, big, fast and the scorer of some absolute thumping belters from distance and beyond. He didn’t get knocked down very often. In late 2011, I was lucky enough to meet Cyrille while he was collecting for charity outside the Hawthorns before a home game. It was wonderful to tell him he was my Albion hero and I nervously but proudly showed him the back of my shirt as proof, emblazoned as it was with ‘Regis 9″. He seemed very surprised to see a fan with his name emblazoned on a recent home shirt and was as gracious as I’d always imagined him to be. It was a great moment for that WBA loving kid that’s still very much me.

Players like Regis, Batson and Cunningham had to face down hideous racism just to do what they did best, week in, week out. There is a much viewed video of West Brom’s famous 1978, 5-3 victory over Man Utd at Old Trafford on You Tube. In the footage, you can clearly hear Laurie Cunningham in particular, being booed repeatedly by the Man Utd fans. It is undoubtedly due to the colour of his skin and unusually for the times is even mentioned by commentator Gerald Sinstadt who makes reference to the «repeated booing of the black players’. The skill shown by Cunningham as he cuts through the United’s midfield is breathtaking. He simply carries on regardless and is described by Sinstadt as «booed but unperturbed», showing what a truly skilful and wonderful football player he was. All three of these players responded to racism in this way and let their football make their response to the ignorance and the mindless chants. To me and hordes of other fans, ‘the Three Degrees’ made our club that bit more special and we took them to our hearts.

In terms of the Albion story, the years that followed on from the success of the late 1970s were mixed and difficult for Baggies fans. My first ever league game was West Brom v Liverpool in February 1981. We won that game 2-0 against the then league champions with a Bryan Robson miraculous back heeled goal. I guess as a kid, I thought this was always how it was going to be. It didn’t work out quite like that. I had to wait thirty more years to sit and watch my club do something truly special, when I was lucky enough to watch Albion beat Arsenal at the Emirates in a Premier League game in September 2010. But it was worth the wait. It was a joy to hear Albion fans on the phone to their loved ones after the game shouting «I feel like we’ve won the Cup!»… other young fans in their 20s proudly proclaimed on Facebook «This is the best day of my life!» It seems ridiculous but I know what they mean. That day in 1981 in the old Rainbow Stand with my Dad with his packet soup packed tartan flask and mini pork pies was one of mine and I’ll never forget it.

In 1992, I persuaded my Dad to come with me to go and see the Albion together for the first time in years. By then they we were languishing in what was the old Division 3. The Hawthorns was tatty and attendance was poor. We were playing Leyton Orient and the performance was lack lustre to say the least. I remember feeling gutted to see the club on its knees after what we had been and I know it was even harder on my Dad who’d see the joyous days of Jeff Astle. But, I was still heartened by the singing of the Brummie Rd and Smethwick End stands and the fact that the hardcore of supporters had stuck with the club. At half time, I went and touched the grass of the Hawthorns pitch, no one seemed to care that I jumped the barrier. It wasn’t the wonderful flair football I’d watched Albion play as a kid but at least we’d scraped a draw. There were many ups and downs to follow – too many to catalogue here – as Albion were to be crowned the classic ‘yo yo’ club – with successive promotions and relegations stressing the hell out of Albion fans for season upon season.

I met one of Albion’s promotion winning bosses, Roberto di Matteo, at Wembley in August 2010. Albion had seen promotion back to the Premier League under Di Matteo during the 2009-2010 Championship season. My friend approached Di Matteo and brought him over to have a photograph with me ‘for my Dad’ as she told him. I remember greeting him mumbling something about being a West Brom fan, probably with the kind of face a Chilean miner might look at his rescuer. God knows what he thought but he obliged with good humoured grace, guess I was remembering that cold, dark day in November 1992 and being ever so grateful for what he and others like Ardilles and Megson and Roy Hodgson after him had brought back to our club.

In 2010, my annual WBA membership renewal came through with a promo leaflet from the club emblazoned with a picture of the Hawthorns and Jeff Astle and had the words, «You were born a Baggie and you’ve been part of the team ever since» written across it. At first I thought it was a bit cheesy then I was surprised that it brought half a tear to the eye, because it’s true enough. It is about belonging and this is what the local football clubs we love do for us.

The club I was ‘born’ into has sometimes been the bain of my life but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Blue and white striped veins, or «Albion ‘til I die», that’s just the way it is.

I hope to God the days of 1992 are banished for ever, but if they came back I know I’ll still love the club and always will. But I’d moan and we do like a good moan when we get going. That’s why we’ll keep singing Psalm 23 whatever the score – you never know when you are going to need some help to get to those green pastures and quiet waters. To this day, I’ll never tire of hearing thousands sing ‘The Lord’s My Shepherd’ in Black Country accents. It can be no coincidence that this is Albion’s football ‘hymn’ and you’ll hear it sung by fans at every match. If ever there was a hymn for the need for faith when you are facing the dark nights of the soul then this is it and my God there’s been a lot of those for us Albion fans. 3-0 up at half time, think you’re safe? Think again. Its what we call «typical bloody Albion» but try and make us stay away – we can’t. We are Albion.

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Didier Drogba and the Ivory Coast Men’s National Soccer Team

Didier Drogba was a smash hit at the African Nations Cup which was produced by CAF (Confederation of African Football) and hosted in Egypt. The final with Ivory Coast took place on February 10 2006 and was won by the host country Egypt 4-2 on penalty shoot-out.

Didier Drogba had the most impact of any other national player of any other of the participaying teams during the course of the intra African match-ups. He is essentially a centeral force on any of the teams he has played on.. This also includes Chelsea of the English Premier League of which he is also a striker.

For team mate, Toure, Drogba presents a potentially decisive edge in the first competitive meeting between Ivory Coast and Nigeria since the 1994 Nations Cup semi-final won by the Nigerians on penalties.

«Drogba is a really great player and he is something special. We are really proud of what hehas a done for the team».

«It’s going to be a very hard game. But now we are in the semi-finals, anything can happen. We’ve got our chance,» said defender Toure.

Seconds into the second half, the whole difference was made when Drogba netted his fourth goal of the tournament and the Elephants could afford to sit back for most of the second half.

The goal stung the Nigerian bench who immediately replaced Mikel Obi with Jay Jay Okocha and Kanu Nwankwo with Julius Aghahowa, but still the Nigerians could not turn the game round. This is the first time the Ivorians, who have qualified for the World cup, will have played in the final since winning the title in 1992 in Senegal.

The Egyptians must thank goalkeeper Essam EL Hadary for saving two penalties as Ivory Coast’s Didier Drogba missed a crucial first spot kick for the Elephants.

COTE D’IVOIRE (Ivory Coast) National Team Line-up

01.Tizie Jean-Jacques Hobrou

02.Akale Kanga Gauthier

03.Boka Etienne Arthur

04.Toure Kolo Abib

05.Zokora Deguy Alain Didier

06.Kouassi Koffiblaise

07.Fae Emerse

09.Kone Arouna

11.Drogba Tebily Didier Yves

21.Eboue Emmanuel

19.Toure Yaya Gnegneri

How many of these following substitutes will make their way to other Premier League teams in Europe and Asia?

10.Yapi Yapo Gilles Donald

08.Kalou Bonaventure

14.Kone Bakari

15.Dindane Aruna

16.Gnanhouan G. Amoukou Okosias

17.Domoraud Depri Cyrille Leandre

18.Tiene Siaka

22.N’dri Koffi Christian Romaric

23.Barry Boubacar

20.Demel Guy Roland

12.Meite Abdoulaye

13.Zoro Kpolo Marc Andre

The battle for African Footballer of the year

Drogba overshadowed Samuel Eto’o, his rival for the African Footballer of the Year award usually held in late February. Didier Drogba scored the decisive penalty to put Ivory Coast into the last four in a dramatic shootout victory over Cameroon in Cairo.

However it might be blindsided by a contender from Egypt. Could Mido be in the mix?

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Brother CS6000i – Lightweight Sewing Machine With Heavy Features

Brief History of the Sewing Machine

The first sewing machine was built in 1874, based on a design made and patented in 1790 by English inventor Thomas Saint. Back in the olden days, sewing machines could only sew one item with a single stitch type. There were only two types available – the hand-crank and the treadles. Later on, although the treadle model is still produced for domestic use even until today, most of them are fitted with a motor for more efficient sewing.

About Brother CS6000i

The Brother CS6000i is a new generation sewing machine. It performs not only simple stitching tasks, but it also performs more advanced tasks such as crafting home decoration, quilting, garment construction, and sewing buttonholes. This computerized sewing machine features an LCD screen which allows for easy stitch selection. There are 60 built-in stitches for utility and decorative purposes to choose from. You just need to select one and the machine will automatically sew the stitch. Using the LCD display, you can adjust the length and width of each stitch (the maximum width is 7 mm). Besides the size of the stitch, the display will also show you which foot should be used for making a certain stitch.

You can also easily adjust the upper thread tension for different types of thread and fabric using the tension control dial. To operate the machine, you can either use the foot pedal or the start/stop button. For sewing small items such as sleeves and cuffs, you can remove its free arm attachment. The Brother CS6000i sewing machine also comes with a needle set, additional bobbins, twin needle, seam ripper, extra spool pin, eyelet punch, leaning brush, screw driver, and 6 different types of snap-on presser feet. You will also get a foot control, a power cord, and instruction manual. 

About Brother Industries, Ltd.

Brother Industries, Ltd. is a Japan-based company which manufactures various products including printers, label printers, large machine tools, typewriters, fax machines, sewing machines, and other computer-related electronic devices. The company was established in 1908 in Nagoya, and was originally named Yasui Sewing Machine Co. The company had its first overseas sales affiliate in 1954 with the establishment of Brother International Corporation (U.S.A.). In 1962, the company’s name was changed to Brother Industries, Ltd. From 1989 to 1999, the company became the primary sponsor of the Manchester City Football Club. This collaboration is considered one of the longest unbroken sponsorship deals of any football club in England.

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