Overcoming Overeating: Managing That Voice In Your Head

"Darn, I forgot to call her back. That's two days in a row! She's going to be pissed. Maybe I should try her now. No, it's too late right now. I'll do it tomorrow."

"Shoot, I can't remember his name. Here he come. What is his name? Dave? … Don? He told me yesterday. Why can't ever remember this stuff? Ugh, this is going to be awkward. "

"God, I just want some chocolate right now. Maybe I should go out and get some before the store closes. But once I start I won't stop. No, I'm not going to do that again tonight. up eating way more than I want to … I really want some chocolate. OK, I'll get some tonight and tomorrow I'll eat really well all day, no sweets. "

"I just ate 2 large chocolate bars in one sitting. What is wrong with me ?! I feel so ugly and fat and disgusting and useless."

In case you haven't noticed already, you have a voice inside your head that never stops. It goes on and on. No matter what the situation, it has something to say. Have you ever wondered how it decides what to say and when to say it? Have you ever wondered if what it's saying is important? Or if its even true?

And if right now you are hearing, "I don't know what you're talking about. I don't have a voice in my head." … THAT'S the voice I'm referring to. Notice that this voice takes both sides of a conversation. It doesn't care which side it takes, it just keeps on talking. It rationalizes, it makes decisions and justifies, it rambles.

When you're tired and trying to fall asleep, it's the dialogue that's running around saying,
"Wait! I forgot to send that email! I can't go to sleep yet. I remembered that earlier this evening but I didn't send it. If I don't get up and write it now … oh, geez .It really late. I mean, honestly, what's the difference if I send it now or first thing in the morning? It's silly to turn on the light, get up and type that out right now. I need to get to sleep, I have a lot of things to do tomorrow. It's so hard to fall asleep right now. "

If you spend time observing this mental chatter, you'll quickly notice it never shuts up . If you watch it closely, you'll notice that it's just trying to find a comfortable place to settle. It will change sides in an instant if that seems like it's more comfortable. If it realizes it's wrong, it will adjust it's perspective and take on the opposite side and keep on talking. Once you start noticing the mental chatter, if you keep at it, you'll begin to notice repeating patterns around certain things. These are the thoughts or chatter that come up again and again. The mental conversations or debates that you have with yourself that you've been having for as long as you can remember.

An interesting thing to discern when you find these repeating conversations is what feelings you have as the dialogue is rambling away.

If you're thinking, "I'm such a pig, I just eat so much food all the time no matter what I do," this creates a feeling. You may not have noticed or made the distinction between the thought (what I'd call an "invisible script") and the feeling created by it. For me, making the distinction between my thoughts and feelings initially took some practice. I had them collapsed as the same thing, all part of the endless dialogue from the voice in my head.

It occurred to me like the voice was reality, talking about what was true.

Then I began to watch the voice and realize how fickle it was. I noticed that this voice would often rationalize things and change sides, depending on what was comfortable. I realized that it was actually silly to believe what it was saying was true , since it would flip around so quickly.

That's around the time I also realized that there were two parts here : there was me, listening to the voice, and then there was the voice. I sometimes refer to the voice as the "animal brain". It can also be called the "ego". Whatever you want to refer to it as, it's the part that chatters … and then there's you that notices this part chattering.

Once I was identifying this voice and it's patterns, what became fascinating was seeing how the voice created feelings.

At one point I journaled about this, writing down my thoughts in one column and my feelings in another.

I was noticing how powerful my thoughts — that voice in my head — were in creating the way I felt. And since the voice in my head is so fickle, when I'm not aware of it, my feelings resulting from the voice are at its mercy.

If the voice is being particularly nasty due to being triggered by something, I feel worse and worse. If I'm not aware, then when the voice says harsh things, I believe those things to be true. The voice may say something nasty about me, my behavior or my appearance, or it may say something gossipy and mean about someone else. Either way, my feelings are affected.

It becomes a snowball effect: something triggers the voice (or my "animal brain" or my ego), the voice starts saying harsh things, I feel bad, the voice keeps going, I feel worse, and that affects my behaviors, actions and words.

A great example of this is if I look in the mirror and the voice says something nasty about my appearance, then I feel ugly, shameful, weak, etc. How likely is it that I'm then going to go nourish myself with the best, most delightful food that I can find and eat only the amount that feels comfortable?

Not likely.

More likely is that I'll beat myself up, restrict my eating all day because I deserve to starve, then cave in and eat a whole bunch in rebellion. This is a very likely outcome if I'm not aware of this voice and not noticing how it affects me.

So what's there to do with this voice? If you try to ignore it or tell it to shut up, it's only going to become louder and more insistent.

The best way to liberate yourself from this incessant chatter is to zoom out and watch it . Become an observer of it. Notice it as a mechanism that has the ability to appear like it's speaking the truth and sounds like someone is in your head talking to you. Don't think about it, just notice it.

No matter what that voice says, nice things or nasty things, it's all the same kind of chatter. It doesn't matter if it's saying superficial things or spiritual things. It's still just a voice in your head. If you are observing it saying things, it's not actually you — you are the one that's hearing it. You're the observer.

When you begin to realize you're not this voice, you're just the one that hears it, you're making an extraordinary leap of growth.

The more you watch it objectively, the more you'll start to see that the voice is meaningless. No matter what the voice is saying, life will continue to unfold as it always has. The voice may hate it or may love it, but life goes on.

So, if this voice is so meaningless, then why does it exist? The answer to this lies in understanding why it says what it says when it says it.

This is when your skills of becoming an observer of the voice come into play. When you can observe the voice, you can start to become interested in why it's saying what it's saying. It might be because there's a buildup of energy inside of you about something that needs to get out. The voice often gets more active when there's a buildup of anxiety, fear, challenge, or desire. The voice also runs even when there's nothing in particular bothering you. It mostly acts as a narrator of your world. It says things like,

"Look at that. The flowers really look good in front of that house."

"Oh, there goes a basset hound. I love those kind of dogs."

"Geez, look at that dress she's wearing. It's not exactly the color I would have chosen, but it looks pretty good on her."

This narration is a way of helping you to feel secure. You're noticing the world around you, so you must be a part of that world. If you're noticing the world around you, then you are having a direct experience with it. The voice is validating your existence.

So this voice goes about validating your existence, then mixing that in your mind with all your other thoughts based on your past, your impressions, your perspectives, etc. As this soup of thought mixes together, you then internally interpret your world. (So ​​what you end up experiencing is actually your personal understanding of the world according to you. It's not the unfiltered, raw experience of what's actually out there. But that's another conversation for another time.)

The voice exists to help you survive in the world based on how it's interpreting things. It will adjust however it needs to in order to feel comfortable and validated.

The more you can notice the voice, the more you can use it as an indicator.

If you notice that it's getting nasty or loud or obsessive, you can become curious. If you notice that you're feeling low, watch what's coming from the voice that's creating the feeling. So rather than reacting automatically and reaching for more food because you're feeling low, or bored, or lonely … you can listen to the voice. You can give it space to run it's course.

Watch the voice urge you to eat more, or chastise you for losing control or whatever it wants to do. Acknowledge it as mental chatter. Then look for why it's saying what it's saying. Appreciate it for trying to express something that's going on for you, and then let it go if it's not serving you. It might get louder. It might try harder to convince you. Keep appreciating it for doing its job by indicating something that it wants expressed, and keep letting it go.

The more you practice this, the easier it will be to be to identify as the observer and not the voice. It's the doorway to having the power to create anything and everything you want in your life.

If you learn how to listen to the voice and use it effectively, this same voice that has caused worry, anxiety and neurosis can become the launching pad for getting you where you truly want to go.

Camisetas de fútbol , NBA y NFL baratas de la mejor calidad y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños. by Chelsea Lorynn O'Brien

The Geography of Liverpool

On a world map the co-ordinates for the city of Liverpool are 53o latitude north and longitude 3o west. Liverpool is a metropolitan borough of Merseyside and a unitary authority in its own right. However, it also still retains historic links with the county of Lancashire, to which it was once part of. The Merseyside metropolis derives its name from the River Mersey and encompasses the cities and towns along its banks, estuary and hinterland. Liverpool is on the eastern bank of the River Mersey and is the fifth largest in England, with a population exceeding 440,000 in an area of around 11100 hectares. The population density in Liverpool is about 40 per hectare.

It has been established that there were settlements along the banks of the River Mersey, in the area we now know as Liverpool, dating back to the 1st century AD. These settlements would have been small fishing communities which, over the centuries, amalgamated into a heavily urbanised area by as early as the 12th century. The surface geology of Liverpool is rarely more than 10 metres thick and is a pebbly silty clay, with some sand and gravel deposits, which were all laid down by the retreating glaciers during the last ice age. The dominant bedrock in Liverpool is sandstone that was laid down in the Triassic era around 250 million years ago. To the west, the city also borders on to Carboniferous shale, mudstone and sandstone deposits as well as the Lancashire Coalfield deposits. At one time the coal deposits were workable but now, with most of the remaining deposits being below 1200m they are deemed unviable economically. However, the potential of coal bed Methane as a source of potentially clean energy is being studied, which might result in the coal deposits having a further use. In the early 1990s an oil and gas field was discovered in Liverpool Bay, out beyond The Wirral. Capable of producing 10 million cubic metres of gas and 70,000 barrels of oil a day, the field is now economically important to the area with an annual turnover exceeding £60 million. With supplies of sand, gravel and clay all available locally the traditional building materials used in Liverpool have been moulded bricks and clay tiles for roofing.

Liverpool technically extends along 21km of the east bank of the River Mersey estuary, rather than being on a river that actually flows through it. The Mersey is formed at the confluence of the River Tame and the River Goyt at Stockport in Lancashire. The famed Manchester Ship Canal joins the river at Eastham Locks and was the route by which imported cotton into the port at Liverpool was transferred to Manchester and the other weaving towns of Lancashire. Although the city of Liverpool has developed around a ridge of seven distinct hills the land rarely rises above 50m, with the highest point being at Everton Hill, 70m.

The climate in Liverpool is typical of England being a temperate one. With most of its weather systems arriving on the prevailing westerly winds, the average temperature in January is 50C and July it is 150C. On average Liverpool receives less than 750ml of rainfall a year which, considering its location on the west coast of England is surprising. However, the landmass of Ireland, to the west, absorbs much of the rainfall coming off the Atlantic Ocean that would otherwise fall on Liverpool. The average expectancy of rain in Liverpool is about 175 days a year. The temperature in January is higher than might be expected for a city in the north of England. This is because the city, and its port, benefit from the blanket effect of the North Atlantic Drift.

For many years Liverpool was seen as an economically depressed area with a stock of low cost and poor quality housing. The recent regeneration of the city has seen the price of the city’s housing stock rise by up to 15% a year over the last 10 years. Currently house prices in Liverpool fluctuate compared to regional and national trends depending on the type of property, but the housing market here is a buoyant one. In early 2007, a semi-detached 3 bedroom house in Liverpool on average cost £155,000, which was the same as the regional average but lower than the national average, which was £185,000. At £290,000 the average price of a typical 4 bed-roomed detached house in Liverpool is again about the same as the regional average but nearly 10% below the national average. A two bed-roomed terraced house in Liverpool will cost about £100,000, which is again about the regional average but almost 20% below the national average. The average regional value of a two bed roomed flat is £115,000 whereas In Liverpool it is £150,000 a figure which is also slightly higher than the national average.

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Susan J Ashby

Top 10 Romantic Getaways in the U.S

How do you make a top-ten list of something subjective like honeymoon locations? Systematically, that’s how.

Highly Scientific Ranking

To create this list, I started with general Internet searches for top honeymoon spots in the U.S. I tried to weed out the advertisers and focused instead on the news and information websites, such as About.com, MSNBC and USA Today.

Next, I began putting the various lists into a spreadsheet, and then cross-referenced the data to find the ten locations that occurred most often on the most lists. When that proved to be way too complicated, I just picked the ten locations I liked the most! Voila … a top-ten romantic getaway list (in no particular order).

Top 10 Romantic Getaways in the United States

1. Mountain Cabin – Part One

If you’re the kind of person that equates «romantic getaway» with «mountain seclusion,» then a cabin in the Rockies might be just the thing. The popular ski towns of Aspen and Vail, Colorado are popular for another reason – cabin retreats. Imagine the snow falling around your warm and cozy cabin. Imagine the smell of hot chocolate and the bubbling sound of a hot tub. And just imagine being there with the one you love!

2. Mountain Cabin – Part Two

The Smokey Mountains come up on a lot of romantic getaway lists. For instance, each year approximately 10,000 people get married in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, a popular vacation spot in the Smokey Mountains. Because of this, the mountain town has become known as the unofficial wedding and honeymoon capital of the South. With its wooded seclusion, small-town charm, and breathtaking mountain views, it’s no wonder so many people equate «Gatlinburg» with «romantic retreat.»

3. Bed & Breakfast in Vermont

Manchester, Vermont offers all the ingredients of a classic New England getaway — white-steepled churches, bed and breakfast accommodations, romantic dining and great skiing.

In more recent times, shopping has also taken root in Manchester. The city’s website, ManchesterVermont.com, says: «Today, visitors to our community come to enjoy Brooks Brothers, Ralph Lauren and J. Crew, as well as the more traditional recreational activities.»

4. Cape Cod, Massachusetts

There’s a reason the Kennedy family owned vacation homes in Cape Cod. This New England seascape is the essence of «small beach town» tranquility. Don’t expect an action-packed beach-resort experience – Cape Cod is not that kind of vacation spot. But if your idea of relaxation is a seaside stroll along historic harbors, biking and boating, and visiting an antique shop or two, then this is your place.

5. San Francisco, California

San Francisco is a picturesque city with a diverse mix of cultures and populations. It’s also a popular destination for couples in search of a romantic getaway. Between the Golden Gate Bridge and their world-famous trolleys, San Francisco offers something for everyone.

As an alternative, you might also consider adjacent Sausalito, California, a Mediterranean-style village that marks the gateway to California Wine Country. And speaking of California wine…

6. California Wine Country

If your idea of romance involves good wine and good scenery, you can’t go wrong with California Wine Country as your destination. Napa Valley and Sonoma County are about an hour’s drive north of San Francisco, and they have long been an attraction for honeymooners, wine lovers, and wine-loving honeymooners. Add in the scenery and the availability of bed-and-breakfast-style lodging, and you have all the makings of a great romantic getaway.

7. Big Island, Hawaii

Sure, some parts of Hawaii are quite touristy. (Waikiki comes to mind.) But there are plenty of locations on the volcano-formed island that offer beauty, seclusion and a nature-rich experience you can’t find anywhere else.

On the Big Island of Hawaii, the Kona Village Resort is famous for providing comfort and luxury in an otherwise remote tropical region. The resort is also a popular spot for honeymooners, and it comes up on quite a few «top ten» lists like this one.

8. Charleston, South Carolina

I grew up in Virginia and have traveled all throughout the Carolinas. But when I think of «Southern hospitality,» one place comes to mind above all others. Charleston, South Carolina. Marjabelle Young Stewart, one of America’s well-known etiquette experts, once called Charleston the «most mannerly» city in the U.S., and I think she was right.

Founded in 1670, Charleston held significance during both the American Revolution and the Civil War. To this day, it retains much of its old-world charm and gentility. Conde Nast Traveler has named it a top-ten domestic destination for nine consecutive years.

There’s one other thing I love about Charleston. I’m a southerner by birth, and I vote for Charleston as having the most delightful of all the southern dialects.

9. Niagara Falls

Okay, so this one’s a bit cliche. But the reason Niagara Falls has been in so many movies, songs and water-cooler conversations is because so many people flock to it with romantic notions in mind. Straddling the border between the U.S. (New York) and Canada, Niagara Falls has attracted honeymooners and getaway-ers for 200 years.

In fact, if you played word-association and said «Niagara Falls,» most people would probably say one of two things – waterfall or honeymoon. For that reason alone, Niagara Falls has earned its place on this list.

10. Home Sweet Home

If you consider your home a cozy refuge from the world, it is in a sense a getaway. After all, home is a place to get away from lots of things — work, school, crowds, relatives, noise, traffic and hassle. It’s also a place where you’re the most comfortable. So there’s certainly nothing unromantic about a crackling fire, a bottle of champagne, and a table for two in home sweet home.

ENVÍO y DEVOLUCIÓN GRATIS – Gran colección de Camisetas de fútbol oficiales – Descubre camisetas de equipos y selecciones europeas en camisetasfutboles.es. by BR Cornett