Travel Options to London City Airport

Dockland Light Railway:

The London City Airport DLR station connects the adjacent airport terminal building and is located to the West of LCY. Train services are available to Bank Station, Canning Town, Stratford International and Woolwich Arsenal.

The DLR runs every 8 -15 minutes from LCY to Bank in London city with a journey time of 22 minutes to Canning Town. The trains operate every 10 minutes to Woolwich Arsenal. Oyster and travel cards are accepted.

Bus:

Bus No. 473 and 474 runs between LCY and local East London destinations.

There is a free shuttle bus service (573) and it runs in a one way loop from London City Airport via Albert Road, Woolwich Free Ferry and Woolwich Manor Way. From Manor way it provides a non – stop service to Prince Regent (DLR) Station and return to London City Airport.

Bus No.474 usually runs towards Canning Town and now it is diverted because of Crossrail Construction work which will be completed by 2015. Currently it runs non-stop via Royal Albert Way between Gallions Reach roundabout and LCY.

Trains:

National Rail provides services outside London and there are many National Rail stations including Waterloo, London Bridge and Stratford International. You can reach these three stations in 7 minutes via the Jubilee line from Canning Town to LCY.

LCY to Other Airports:

Heathrow:

There is no direct connection between LCY and London Heathrow. You can travel by Heathrow Express from London Heathrow to Paddington and then reach LCY with two interchanges by Underground and DLR.

Gatwick:

You can travel from Gatwick Airport to London Bridge by Thameslink train and then travel by train to London City Airport. You can also travel by Gatwick Express from Gatwick Airport Rail Station to Victoria underground and then reach LCY with two interchanges by DLR and Underground.

Stansted:

There is no direct link between LCY and Stansted Airport. You can travel by Stansted Express from Stansted Airport to Liverpool Street Station and then can travel by Underground and DLR to reach LCY.

Luton:

You can travel by National Rail from London Luton to St Pancras International and then can travel by Underground and DLR to reach LCY.

Taxi:

Taxis are one of the best and convenient ways of travel to and from LCY. You can hire a taxi from taxi ranks available outside the airport terminal. You can also pre book a taxi or minicab with some private taxi companies to avoid standing in long queues at the taxi ranks.

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Manchester: The Free Spirit City in Northwest England

Of all the cities of Europe, Manchester is the most progressive, and after London the most important city in England. Socially, there is an motivational energy in Manchester that is a driving force socially and culturally. Manchester has embraced the realities of the social changes of the 21st century in an open manner. This is so for two reasons. There are five universities and five colleges in Manchester, and the resulting youthful dynamic this provides has considerable influence. Yet this influence is in complete harmony with and magnifies the long tradition of the Mancunian propensity to challenge the status quo, to be the vanguard of social change, and in being pro-active in civil liberties and civil rights. This has created a very different English city in tone, demeanor, and appearance than what Americans may expect.

The Rebuilding

Because of extensive bombing during World War II, there was a considerable amount of rebuilding, and with the Mancunian penchant for innovation, instead of rebuilding the old they constructed buildings of contemporary design. So the look and feel of Manchester is that of a dynamic city that is definitely quirky, but also modern and impressive.

Madchester

This dynamicism has been a magnet for creative young artists and musicians from across Britain, and this has created a very active cultural climate in the fine arts and in the performing arts. Manchester is home of the ‘musical revolution’ that brought about the Hallé symphony orchestra and progressive music groups such as The Stone Roses, Oasis, Happy Mondays, the Inspiral Carpets, James, and hundreds more. Manchester’s music revolution was even dramatised in the 2002 film, «24 Hour Party People», a 3½ star digital-video depicting the punk era through the late-’80s «Madchester» era. The music scene in Manchester is a source of local pride and is representative of the spirit of this great city.

Youthful Adventures

With such a large and vibrant uni student population in Manchester, that means a lot of uni student life, and nightlife. If you want a night out on any night of the week, that’s no problem. There is always a cheap club to get in with no dress code, packed pubs with happy hours, lots of cheap food including ‘takeaway’ (takeout food), and places to meet girls, places to meet guys, places to meet girls and guys, whatever you want.

First, head on down to the section of the city called Studentville. It’s the Oxford Road area and it is packed with pubs, bars less picky about dress style, and it’s active most of the time.

The Northern Quarter is in Manchester City Centre between Shudehill and Victoria Station. This is a bohemian and offbeat alternative lifestyle area with a lot of cafés, pubs, bars, music shops, art galleries, clothes boutiques, and emporiums. In the Northern Quarter you can find all sorts of weird, delightful, and wonderful stuff. The pubs and bars are located mostly on High Street and Oldham Street. There is also a bazaar in Affleck’s Palace, which use to be a department store. Some cafés morph into nightlife with various music venues.

The Gay Village is a unique centre for the large and flourishing gay community. The Gay Village is in the Canal Street and Chorlton Street area and includes Sackville, Whitworth, and Princess Streets. Across the canal is Sackville Gardens and Manchester College. Canal street is a pedestrian street lined with is lined with gay bars and restaurants.

Manchester Pride is a yearly ten-day LGBT event that takes place in mid-to-late August. It includes a Pride Fringe festival, film showings, a colorful parade that makes their way across the city and ending in the Gay Village, and a weekend celebration called ‘The Big Weekend’. This is a ticketed three-day program of outdoor entertainment in the Gay Village during the August bank holiday weekend. It all ends with a Candlelit Vigil in Sackville Gardens.

Free Things to Do

Here is a partial list of free things to do around Manchester.

  • The John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester at 150 Deansgate, south of Bridge Street, is unusual and beautiful on the inside. It is a masterwork of Victorian Gothic (or Neo-Gothic) architecture. There is a collection in the library of magnificent medieval manuscripts.
  • Museum of Science and Industry or MOSI, on Liverpool Road aims to make science and industry inspirational and enjoyable. Well, that depends what part of this huge museum you are in. However, there are trains you can actually ride, a Planetarium, and a 4D cinema (you do pay for a fairly old short film, about £5.50, which is generally rated as fair). The airplane display is near the end of the entire exhibit area and since the place is really big, don’t wear out too early because the planes are rather cool. Just quickly walk pass the boring story-board exhibits. Some people be delirious about this place. I don’t know why, but the planes, planetarium, and trains are def. There is a decent restaurant and coffee shop in the museum.
  • Heaton Park, four miles north of the city centre in Prestwich, offers huge green lawns with good views of Manchester, row boats on the lake, footpaths to walk through the woods, cycle paths as well, a beautiful and quirky 18th century mansion, Smithy Lodge, open to the public with period furniture, and a farm with farm animals and beekeeping to see.
  • Whitworth Art Gallery on Oxford Road next to Whitworth Park at Manchester University is especially known for their collection of British watercolours and modern and historic prints. Of course there are also drawings, paintings and sculptures. There is a summer program of events to check out.
  • City Airport & Heliport‘s Art Deco control tower is open to the public, free, and you can observe the planes and helicopters landing and taking off. City Airport is on Liverpool Road in Eccles and is not to be confused with the Manchester International Airport on the other side of town.

Other places to visit include the Manchester Art Gallery, The Lowry, National Football Museum, Peoples History Museum, Manchester Museum, and Manchester Cathedral.

Like the rest of England, there are a list of festivals as well as local events in Manchester that occur during the warm months. These include such things as the Manchester Picnic, various displays and «thought provoking experiences» at Tatton Park, the Float-In Movie, Harry Potter Day, and Canal Festival. Check the local tourist office for details on festivals the occur during your visit.

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Football Betting Tips For Beginners

Football is one of the most popular sports in the world and as a result many people bet on it. If you are a beginner and you want to bet on the world’s famous sport, here are tips that you should put into practice for you to be successful:

Bet what you know

While there are some betters who are gamblers and fans second, you should not be like them. As a beginner you should start betting on sports that you know something about.

For example, if you have been following Manchester United Football Club for a long time, you should start by betting on it before you move to other teams.

Time your wagers cautiously

In sports betting, odds fluctuate within a very short time; therefore, you should be very cautious. For example, the odds can fluctuate as a result of player injuries, breakthrough performances, and even as a result of action of other gamblers.

To be successful you should place your bets at the right time when you are more likely to make a profit.

Diversify your accounts

Online sportsbooks have different specialties. For example, there are books that specialize in European soccer leagues and others that specialize in the African league.

For you to get the most you should open accounts with multiple books so that you can have more options in terms of odds and the number of games that are available for betting. Having many accounts also makes it easy for you to shift your bankroll.

Make use of the customer service

Legitimate online bookmakers have well trained and professional customer service representatives who handle issues on behalf of the company. If you have any questions or problems, you should not shy away from contacting your bookmaker.

The good side is that there are many ways of contacting the customer service representatives. For example, you can contact them via phone, email, or live chat.

Start with simple bets

As a beginner you should stick to the basics and avoid complex issues such as between props, teasers, grand salami, and others. As rule of thumb you should start with basics.

Starting with simple bets protects you from losing money. The practice also gives you a strong foundation and you are able to learn how to bet like a pro within a very short time.

Take advantage of betting forums and message boards

These places have plenty of information that can be of great help to you; therefore, you should participate in them.

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How To Choose The Best Printed T-Shirt Company

You may be looking for custom printed t-shirts for the entire staff crew in order to attend a sporting event or you may want all the members of your gang to look similar. Whatever the reason behind you looking for a company that will help in custom designing your t-shirt, you need to check for a few traits that ensures you of the highest quality and affordability. The company needs to be punctual in delivering your merchandise too.

The world is buzzing with names of companies that can provide you with custom design t-shirts. With so many options to choose from, it is vital that you be able to choose a company that ensures they follow all the rules in creating magic. You need to take precautions and follow a set of steps to be awarded with the name of a single company that meets your budget providing you the best of services ensuring all your requirements are liberally met.

First and foremost make sure you have the right count. You will need a clear picture of how many t-shirts you need designed. You may be a member of a team taking part in a marathon or one among a group of friends attending a theme party. Either way, ensure to get the sizes of all the team mates. This way you will know the budget you can afford to set. Most t-shirt printing companies give you the option of choosing their own t-shirts, this helps with avoiding multiple bills and payments.

It is important to order a spare for each of your team members as there are chances that the t-shirt might get dirty and they will need a change. It is vital that members dress neatly in case of a promotion. This will help increase brand visibility.

The next step is to identify a design. The design should coordinate with the t-shirt. If you are a company, then the logo of the company can be incorporated. Choose the company colors so that you know it is going to be different and helps in standing out of a crowd.

Identifying and setting a deadline is crucial. The printing company has to be briefed on when you would like the delivery to be made. When identifying a deadline you need to keep in mind that there may be alterations or changes required so it is wise to set a window that will give you space for changes.

Setting a budget is important because this will allow you to choose the best options within your budget. There are many options available these days. Some of it are vinyl printing, embroidery etc. The choice is based on your budget and requirement.

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Zinedine Zidane

Zinedine Zidane, the monk-like fantasista – heir to Platini's throne as France's greatest ever player, is also widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Maybe slightly overrated in some quarters when labelled with the 'Greatest Ever' tag, his achievements and trophy haul are certainly second to very few. For a time he was also the most expensive player in the world, costing Real Madrid a huge £ 46m. During his playing days Zidane became one of world football's true superstars, and much loved players – his global fan base was (and still is) exceptional. From Europe, to North Africa (the origin of his roots) and the Middle East, to Japan – Zidane, was the man.

Zidane was born to Algerian immigrants who firstly moved to Paris, but eventually settled in La Castellane – a suburb with a huge North African community in France's southern town of Marseille. It was here that Yazid Zidane was born in 1972. Yazid, his birth name, is what he was known by to his friends and family. The young Yazid looked to replicate his idol; Olympic Marseille's very own fantasista, Uruguayan Enzo Franchescoli, by teaching himself tricks and repetitively juggling a football until he was better than most of the boys in the area. In a neighborhood high in crime rate Zidane had to become tough, though this was mostly focused through Judo – something else he showed an early talent for. But it was football that won the youngsters heart. After school he would gather with the other boys from his tower block, in 'Place Tartane' – an 80 x 12 yard clearing in the middle of the housing complex, which served as a makeshift football pitch. By 13 years old his talent was such that he was spotted by a scout for Cannes who proclaimed: 'I've found a boy who has hands where his feet should be'. After initial scepticism he was allowed to join the club's 'center de formation', leaving home and his family in the process to lodge with a club director's family.

By 16 years old he was making his league debut versus Nantes. Then, playing the same opponents two years on, he scored his first senior league goal in a 2-1 win. Remembering the promise he made the young Zidane upon scoring his debut goal, the president rewarded him with a brand new Renault Clio. Unfortunately for the 20 year old Zizou, the Va Va Voom factor wore off pretty quick as Cannes were relegated the very next season. His skills didn't go unnoticed however and with an offer coming in from Bordeaux, Zidane moved South for approximately £ 300k, where he would be reunited with his junior international team mate and close friend Christophe Dugarry. They formed part of an exciting new team that made waves in Europe as well as at home, winning the Intertoto Cup in 1995 and finishing runners-up in the UEFA Cup. It was during this period he also made his national team debut in 1994, coming off the bench whilst France were 2-0 down against the Czech Republic, and scoring twice. The press went wild – the new Platini had arrived. People outside of France were now beginning to take notice of Zidane's attributes. The then Premiership Champions Blackburn Rovers coach Ray Harford expressed an interest in the midfielder, only for Blackburn's owner Jack Walker to refuse, famously stating: 'Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?'

Zizou was a relative late bloomer on the world stage. He was already aged 24 when gaining his first major move – Juventus paying a modest £ 3.2m in 1996 to take him from the Bordeaux side that had starred (particularly against AC Milan) in the previous seasons UEFA Cup. Juve had chosen to snap him up before the summer's Euro'96 competition in case of any value increase. But after his poor, lackluster performances during the tournament, they probably saw their new commodity depreciate in value – leading Juventus president Gianni Agnelli to cuttingly remark: 'is the real Zidane the one I've heard so much about, or the one I' ve been watching? ' To be fair to Zidane, he had just completed a mammoth 65-match season. Then on the eve of the Euros, he suffered a car crash. His arrival in Turin signalled more 'new Platini' comparisons. But after a difficult period of adjustment to the new league, murmurs of disappointment could be heard throughout the Juve faithful, leading Zidane to announce: 'I'm Zinedine Zidane and it's important that the fans understand that I can never be Platini, on or off the pitch. ' He was right. Zidane was a totally different character to the former Juventus number 10, and what's more that shirt at Juve now belonged to Del Piero. Zidane's squad number at La Vecchia Signora was 21 – an alien number to a fantasista, however after the frosty start in Turin his performances started to resemble a true fantasista. With winning goals against championship rivals Inter, and by helping Juve secure their second Intercontinental Cup in November versus River Plate, Zidane silenced his doubters. The win was made even sweeter for Zidane as he faced his teenage idol, Enzo Francescoli. The Uruguayan fantasista was ending his career back at the club where he had shot to fame. For Zidane, life couldn't get any better.

Only it could.

That trophy was the first major of his senior career and sparked a remarkable winning period which would see him collect nearly every major trophy the sport had to offer during an incredible career. His stay at the Turin giants saw him win the Scudetto twice, a UEFA Supercup and another Intertoto Cup. During the same period with France he collected the 1998 World Cup and then followed it up with the European Championship in 2000. The only major trophy which evaded him was the Champions League. He had finished runner-up twice with Juve and now it seemed like his Holy Grail. It was probably a major factor in his decision to leave Juventus in the summer of 2001, when Real Madrid came calling and splashed out a whopping £ 47m for his services. The Real president Florentino Perez was embarking on his first galactico project, signing the best players in the world. And at this time, nobody was better than Zidane, having also picked up the greatest accolades any individual player could win – the Ballon d'Or in 1998, and World Player of the Year in that same year, whilst also collecting it in 2000. In 1996 when he arrived at Juventus he may have been labeled as an inferior model to the great Platini, but in 2001 he was leaving having certainly surpassed him.

In Spain, Zidane won the watching Bernabeau faithful over instantly. They adored his velvet touch and instant control. His mastery over the ball reminded their older followers of their glorious players from the past – not least their greatest ever player, Alfredo Di Stefano, who's number 5 shirt Zidane now wore (the number 10 shirt was taken by Real's first galactico, Luis Figo) . The similarity would be greatly enhanced by the end of that season, when Zidane inspired Madrid to reach the European Cup final in Glasgow – scene of their infamous 7-3 victory in 1960 versus Eintracht Frankfurt from Germany. During that match the great Di Stefano was at the peak of his powers, scoring a hat-trick. Real's modern day number 5 couldn't quite emulate three goals, but scored what is considered the greatest goal in European Cup final history – a tremendous volley with his left foot (his wrong foot) from the edge of the penalty box, to lead Real to a 2-1 win over Bayer Laverkusen … from Germany. He had completed his Holy Grail.

Zidane won further trophy's whilst in Spain, adding a La Liga championship, a UEFA Supercup and another Intercontinental Cup to his now bursting trophy cabinet. He also claimed a third World Player of the Year award in 2003, making him the joint highest ever recipient (alongside Ronaldo).

Zizou was more than a collection of awards though. To watch him play during his peak was like watching the top ballet star perform, albeit in football boots, such was his elegance and technique when controlling and gliding with the ball. His signature move, the roulette, looked like a graceful pirouette performed in the middle of a clumsy mob, leaving his midfield markers dumfounded and kicking fresh air. His attributes led Michel Platini to observe: 'Technically, I think he is the king of what's fundamental in the game – control and passing. I don't think anyone can match him when it comes to controlling or receiving the ball. ' Brazilian coaching legend Carlos Alberto Parreira put it rather more bluntly, though non-the less complimentary, simply labeling him: 'a monster!'

Unlike many of the other legendary fantasisti, Zidane wasn't a great goalscorer, never reaching double figures in Italy or Spain. However, he was most definitely a scorer of great goals. More importantly he was a scorer of decisive goals in big games, especially on the international stage. He scored twice (two identical headers) in the 1998 World Cup final, when France beat Brazil 3-1 to win their first ever (and only) World Cup. During Euro 2000 he scored a sublime free-kick in the quarter-finals versus Spain, then, followed it up scoring a Golden Goal in the semi-final win versus Portugal. Euro 2004 saw a poor French performance but Zidane provided one of the highlights of the competition when scoring twice (a free-kick and a penalty) in injury time, turning a 1-0 defeat into a 2-1 victory versus England during the opening group game. Cementing his place as a legendary World Cup performer in 2006 Zidane scored the winner, another penalty versus Portugal in the semi-final. He then scored (another penalty) again in another World Cup final, giving France an early lead against Italy in what was his final match as a professional footballer (he had announced his retirement from the game before the tournament). Sadly for him, France lost that game. Even sadder was the fact that Zidane wasn't able to stay on the pitch until the final whistle – having received a red card. Unfortunately for Zizou, red cards also form part of his legend.

As a playmaker Zidane's expression was all in his creative flair and artistry. However, during his career he was no stranger to some unsavory incidents on the football pitch. Zidane was sent-off a massive 12 times during his career (including five times at Juventus and twice whilst at Real Madrid) – mostly for retaliation. These violent flashpoints were in direct contrast to his perceived cool persona as he glided around the field, though his brooding, often moody stare also served as a warning; he was a player who would not be bullied. His response to provocation was first noted during his younger days at Cannes. Whilst he never started any trouble, he knew how to take care of himself. As Richard Williams deftly puts it in his excellent book 'The Perfect 10', he would respond: 'in a way that might be expected from a boy formed in a tough quarter of a hard-nosed city, where an injury might be repaid with a headbutt '. Fast forward 18 years and Marco Materazzi was living testament that age had not mellowed Zidane's own sense of personal justice – a flying headbutt to the Italian's chest in response to alleged provocation during the 2006 World Cup final. His last act as a professional footballer.

Many forget however, that this was not Zizou's first red card during a World Cup tournament. Indeed during France's triumphant World Cup victory in 1998 it is very easy to forget, in all the hysteria of his two headed goals in the final, that he was briefly a French villain. During the second group game versus Saudi Arabia, the balding fantasista inexplicably lost his cool and stamped on the back of the Saudi captain whilst he was lay on the ground after a challenge. It left the watching world mystified, as this time Zidane's brand of personal justice seemed to come without any direct provocation. The French poster-boy was given a two match suspension, putting 'Les Bleus' campaign in jeopardy – the then captain Didier Deschamps summing up the nervous feeling of the nation: 'I know he's impulsive, but he's put us all at risk'. Indeed without Zidane, the French struggled (eventually winning) in their last-16 tie versus Paraguay – which is testament to the effect Zizou had on the national team. This would become a worrying noticeable feature of all the French teams for the next decade; such was Zidane's stature and ability. With him, they were world beaters, without him they looked also rans. During qualification for the 2006 finals, the French (without Zidane who had announced his international retirement in 2004) almost failed to qualify. Zidane (along with Thuram and Makelele) answered the call to help out his country and was immediately reinstated as captain. In doing so he instantly rejuvenated the French who went on to reach the (ill-fated) final of the tournament – along the way knocking out previous and future champions Brazil and Spain, with Zidane in imperious form and winning the competition's Most Valuable Player award .

So with this fantasista, we had the beauty and the beast. The grace and the violence. Taking the rough with the smooth, he was one hell of a player – maybe Parreira had described him best after all … he was a monster!

Bio

Born: 23rd June 1972 in Marseille (France)

Height: 1.85m / 6ft 1 ''

Career

1988-1992: Cannes – 61 apps / 6 goals

1992-1996: Bordeaux – 139 apps / 28 goals

1996-2001: Juventus – 151 apps / 24 goals

2001-2006: Real Madrid – 155 apps / 37 goals

Totals: 506 app / 95 goals

1994-2006: France – 108 caps / 31 goals

Honors

World Player of the Year: 1998, 2000, 2003

Ballon D'Or: 1998

FIFA World Cup: 1998

UEFA European Championship: 2000

UEFA Champions League: 2002

UEFA Supercup: 1996, 2002

Intercontinental Cup: 1996, 2002

Serie A Champions: 1997, 1998

La Liga Champions: 2003

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Barca’s Got The Bark And The Bite!

Wearing their white colored away kit, Man U kicked off as the stronger side with Cristiano Ronaldo threatening to score five minutes into the game. But with Barca midfielders Andres Iniesta and Xavi Hernandez possessively controlling the ball, Man U soon lost control. Iniesta in his Nike T90 Laser II football boots paved the way for the opening goal when he found Samuel Eto’o, who deftly hit the net.

Red, white and blue

The atmosphere in the stadium was electric as fans from both sides came out in full support of their favorites dressed in their team colors. The stands seemed draped in shades of red, white and blue! The new Nike FC Barcelona home soccer gear saw a return to traditional vertical stripes of red and blue, said to be «designed to inspire the kind of football the club’s famous for – spirited, passionate and oozing Catalan pride!» And did it work! Post half time, midfielder Lionel Messi headed the ball over Edwin Van der Sar and clinched the second goal. He seemed adequately thrilled with his brand new boots – custom made Adidas F30i – and happily kissed them!

Certainly More than a Club!

On the one side, Man U could boast of star players like Wayne Rooney, Ronaldo, Tevez and Berbatov, on the other side, Barca dominated with the likes of Messi, Henry, Eto’o, Xavi and Iniesta. If the Catalan greats, Barca, scored 100 goals at the Liga, Messi, Henry and Eto’o were responsible for 69 of them! Maybe the white away kit wasn’t too lucky for Manchester United as they saw their dream to win their third Champions League trophy shatter. While the Catalans struck gold with their new look – a V-necked Nike Dri-Fit shirt that has the Catalan flag on the back of the neck and the label ‘Más que un club’ (More than a club) sewn inside. Barca stuck to its policy of not having a sponsor’s logo on their soccer shirts; something they have been adamant about ever since the club was formed. But they retained the UNICEF logo as part of the deal to not take any money, but use it to fund UNICEF’s humanitarian programs.

Three Cheers for the Champions

With this win, Barca now has three trophies to its credit – the Champions League, Liga and the Copa del Rey. Celebrations broke out on the streets of Barcelona when the team returned home. Thousands of ecstatic fans followed the open topped bus that had ‘Tricampeones’ (Three times Champion) emblazoned on it. To mark this special occasion, the players wore commemorative shirts with the words ‘Copa, Liga y Champions’ along with the team members names stamped on it.

Forgetting all protocol, the players ran onto the pitch of Camp Nou stadium and proudly held the three trophies up to their supporters who sang and chanted in reciprocation! The evening was sealed with another lap of honor, this time to the tune of Coldplay’s ‘Viva la Vida’ and crackling fireworks!

Whoever said what’s in a name seemed to have got it all wrong! A name, a number, a color – this is what champions are made of…

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Giorgio Pirelli