Losing More Weight Faster With Low Carb Diet Food

Just as the name suggests, a low carb diet includes foods that are low in carbohydrates and naturally high in proteins. There are plenty of options available when deciding to eat a low carb diet. Fish, poultry, many cheeses and salad greens are all low carb favorites that will satisfy your hunger and help you avoid carbohydrates.

The greatest advantage of eating these foods is that you will find yourself losing weight in a short amount of time. By reducing or eliminating the carbohydrates you consume you will begin to shed extra pounds without sacrificing taste and satisfaction in the foods you eat.

Plan Your Meals Ahead

Start by planning your food selections ahead of time in order to keep variety in your diet, and to avoid eating the same foods repeatedly. For most dieters, the main objective is weight loss, which is the reason for consuming diet food low in carbohydrates. Additionally, some people who have been diagnosed with hyperinsulinemia will do well on this diet. These foods help regulate blood pressure, stabilize high triglycerides and have been found to help people suffering from certain anxiety disorders.

Some people with digestive problems or others who are trapped in binge eating patterns will benefit from a low carb diet which can offer a solution to all of these maladies. They aim to reduce or eliminate white flour and sugar, both culprits in so many eating and digestive problems.

Some fruits, although not all, are excluded when doing these diets. Certain dieters need just 25 grams of carbs every day, while others require even less. Usually, low carb diets include seafood, eggs, meat, some cheeses, some fat, most fruits and low starch vegetables.

You can find a large selection of low carbohydrate diet recipes that are easy and enjoyable. Included in your personal diet food options are the Atkins Diet and the South Beach Zone Diet.

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How to Choose the Best Spinning Reel on the Market

Spinning reels are a helpful tool that every avid fisher should have in their arsenal. These are so popular among fishers of all skill levels because they are very lightweight, intuitive, and easy to use. However, not all spinning reels are created equal. Since this type of reel is such a crucial part of the fishing process, it's important to find the best spinning reel on the market. Here are some tips and tricks to help you find the best one for your needs.

Material and Construction

The construction of spinning reel is very important to your fishing success. It's important to choose a reel that is durably constructed so you'll be able to get years of use out of it. To test the construction of the reel, look at how the parts are assembled. Everything should feel solid, with no flimsy parts, and the materials should feel heavy duty. When the reel is in motion, the action should feel smooth and comfortable.

It's also important to consider the material your reel is made of. Generally, spinning reels are made from either graphite or aluminum. There are pros and cons to both materials. Aluminum reels are very strong, but they can also be very heavy, which can be a challenge for some fishers. However, their construction tends to be more solid. Graphite reels are lighter and easier to handle, which make them a good choice for beginner fishers. They're also essential for anyone who fishes in saltwater, because graphite does not corrode in the same way other materials do.

Speed ​​and Gear Ratio

The speed at which your wheel rotates will affect the level of control you have over the reel. To determine what speed you need for your reel, you'll need to look at the gear ratio of your reel. The gear ratio indicates how many times the reel rotates with the rotation of the handle. A higher gear rotation means the gear will rotate faster. For new fishers, a slow to mid-range gear rotation is going to be the most effective for control.

Size

Since spinning reels can be very heavy, the overall size is very important to consider. The weight should also be directly correlated with the weight of the line you intend to use. For bigger fish, you will need to use a heavier line. If you are using a heavier line, it's important that your reel can handle the extra weight. However, it's also important to consider how the reel handles overall. If you don't have much upper body strength, it's best to start with a light reel and work your way up to heavier fishing.

Spool Quality

Another factor that is very important to consider is the overall quality of the spool on the spinning reel. The way the spool is constructed will affect the smoothness and overall handling while you're casting. There are two types of spools – internal and skirted. Skirted spools are generally the preferred style of spool in modern fishing because they help prevent tangling of the line. For those who prefer a longer casting distance, it may also be helpful to look for a long cast spool that will reach much further. The cast and feel of the spool is something that's important to test before making a purchase.

Pricing

Fishing materials can be very expensive, so it's important to find a reel that will give you the best value for money. You may have to spend more to get the quality you need, but it's important to make sure the price directly corresponds to the value of the reel. A good reel is an investment piece, so don't hesitate to take your time shopping around to find the best spinning reel on the market.

There are many factors to consider when shopping for a spinning reel. The overall construction and handling of the product is essential to the way the reel handles. When in doubt, try to go to a local fishing shop and test the reels in person with the help of an expert. This will help you find the reel that is the best fit for you.

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Starcraft 2 Vs Starcraft 1 – What’s Different?

Starcraft 1.5, or Starcraft 2?

There’s been a lot of weary forum users making the claim that Starcraft 2 is really just Starcraft 1.5. This will be the topic of this article. I’ll start out by listing all the new changes for Starcraft 2 and Battle.net 2.0.

Changes:

Terran:

Units Removed

Removed Vulture

Removed Firebat

Removed Goliath

Removed Wraith

Removed Medic

Removed Science Vessel

Removed Valkyrie

That’s a pretty hefty chunk of units from the Terran arsenal that have been removed. Mind you this is still beta so this is all subject to change.

Units Added

Banshee

Hellion

Marauder

Reaper

Medivac

Raven

Thor

Viking

Units Kept

SCV

Marine

Siege Tank

Ghost

Battlecruiser

That means that 62% of the the Terran units are brand new.

Terran Macro Mechanics

The Terran has a unique macro mechanic that is used after upgrading the Command Center to an Orbital Command center. What it does is collect 30 minerals every load, but takes about 3 times longer than an SCV per load. Basically that would mean it independently collects about twice as fast as an SCV does.

The downside to using the MULE however is that a player must sacrifice the usage of a scanner sweep; both abilities take your Orbital Command’s Energy. This has been the cause of some lost games. Terran players must be careful not to get greedy.

Now we’ll take a look at the Protoss.

Changes:

Protoss:

Units Removed

Removed Dragoon

Removed Arbiter (debatable)

Removed Corsair

Removed Dark Archon

Removed Reaver

Removed Shuttle

There weren’t as many units removed from the Protoss arsenal, let’s take a look at the units added though.

Units Added

Colossus

Immortal

Mothership

Phoenix

Void Ray

Warp Prism

Sentry

Not bad, only one less unit than the Terran side.

Units Kept

Probe

Zealot

Dark Templar

High Templar

Carrier

Observer

Archon

54% of the Protoss units are brand new. The Mothership is almost exactly like the Arbiter however so there is room for debate there.

Protoss Macro Mechanics

The Protoss have an ability called Chronos that is available directly from the Nexus. It costs 25 energy, and speed up any building production by 30% for a period of time. This is an extremely powerful macro mechanic because it can be used to build fast probes in the early game, it can be used to get a Zealot harassing very early game, or it can be used to get some very fast upgrades.

The only downside to the Protoss macro mechanic is what you don’t use it on. If you decide to pump out a heavy amount of units, your economy will most likely fall behind your competition’s economy. It could put you in a position to make a push but if the push fails you’ll probably be in trouble.

Now my personal favorite: the Zerg.

Changes:

Zerg:

Units Removed

Removed Guardian

Removed Lurker (This has been causing some controversy)

Removed Scourge

Removed Defiler

Removed Queen

Removed Devourer

Not bad… not bad. I may catch some flak for adding the Queen to this list, but I think it’s pretty apparent that Starcraft 2’s Queen isn’t even close to the original.

Units Added

Roach (woot!)

Queen

Baneling

Changeling

Infestor

Corrupter

Overseer

Brood Lord

Infested Terran

Zerg got the most new units. The Infestor is kind of like the Defiler, and is certainly meant to be it’s replacement. Right now I question the viability of it however.

Units Kept

Drone

Zergling

Hydralisk

Overlord* – No longer has detection capabilities. This was replaced by the Overseer.

Ultralisk

Broodling

56% of the Zerg units are brand new.

Zerg Macro Mechanics

If you compared the new Zerg macro mechanic to the other Macro mechanics, I think you’d find that there’s less room for debate on which Queen option is the most effective. The Queen has three macro abilities: Spawn Creep Tumor, which extends creep radius in a spiral outward from the tumor. This can be used to connect bases or perhaps for scouting. One of the most important upsides to this is creep allows vision, and faster movement for your units.

The other ability is to restore a units health or a building’s health. This can be used on defensive structures. I think the downside to this though is that any mediocre skilled player will attack the Queen relatively quickly. And to save the best for last, the Queen also has spawn larvae. For 25 energy (like her other abilities), the Queen injects larva into your hatcheries and after a period of time, the hatchery will spit out 4 extra larva. This can be quite devastating early game, and the only reason I can see players using the other options is if the game gets past early game. This is by far the most effective option for your war camp. More units = more power, more economy, or whatever you want.

Updated Mechanics

Some of the largest changes in Starcraft 2 do not come with the new units. They come in the form of new mechanics. Starcraft 2 is now an actual 3-dimensional game. What this means is the Terrain levels are for more than just looks now. Units like the Reaper and Colossus can actually go over higher level terrain.

Now this might not seem like much, but this changes entirely the effect of ramps in the game. In Starcraft 1, you absolutely had to go through static defenses to assault a base barring drops and Nydus canals. This made the ramp an extremely powerful (and sometimes irritating) map feature. Economy harass can now be accomplished much earlier in the game should your opponent decide to mass photon cannons outside his ramp.

Another new gameplay mechanic that Starcraft 2 has added is in the form of destructible rocks. These are generally back-doors into your opponents base, and if they aren’t watchful you could have a 1-way ticket straight to their main. Or they to yours. These new mechanics have seriously hindered the effect of turtling, which means you wall up in your base (generally a Terran favorite with siege tanks). I consider this a very good thing, because turtling is a very bad strategy in the fact that it allows your opponents free reign over the entire map. You may be able to hold them off for a few minutes, but they’ll eventually get enough minerals, gas, and units to pummel any sort of defenses you may be able to build on one base.

Maynarding

The economy in Starcraft 1 is generally very confusing. It’s an almost organic system that scales un-proportionally to how many workers you have gathering. While the law of diminishing returns was very much in effect (each worker past a certain point was less effective than the previous) [especially due to the bad pathing in Starcraft 1], it did allow a viable strategy called Maynarding. Maynarding is credited to a certain player of the same name, where while building an expansion, you could make all the extra workers you needed for the expansion, effectively saturating the minerals as soon as the expansion was built.

In Starcraft 2, worker pathing and pathing in general is very much improved. Workers don’t fly around trying to find an available mineral patch. In fact, they’ll patiently wait the few milliseconds it takes for another worker to finish mining. What this means though, is there is nearly a cap on how many workers per base is effective. It’s generally thought to be 2 workers per patch in Starcraft 2. This is a great thing, but it does severely hinder the benefits of Maynarding. While those workers you were making in Starcraft 1 would still help your economy while you waited for your expansion, the benefit is severely reduced in Starcraft 2. What this effectively means is that every expansion takes much longer to actually saturate to be efficient. This also means that losing an expansion early on is devastating because you won’t earn back the cost quickly.

Unit selection cap, and multiple building select

Another widely debated topic amongst hardcore fans is the new unit selection cap. Starcraft had a cap of 12 units that could be selected at once due to old user-interface problems. The new game though, Starcraft 2, allows for up to 255 units to be selected at once. This changes gameplay so much! Instead of 1a2a3a (Hotkey, attack, etc.) it’s click and drag mouse, a. I actually really like this new mechanic, as it doesn’t take 150 APM to simply assault a base. I think it allows for more strategy as a newer player, and welcome it.

Pro players may find a distaste for it, because they may assume it lowers the skill cap between pro players and mediocre players. I somewhat disagree, because just sending all your units into an attack can be a very bad thing as well; it can cause you to lose your entire army if you don’t pay attention. Pros will still use hotkey groups and try to attack from multiple places at once.

Multiple building select is another thing that may be seen as lowering the overall skill ceiling of the game. It’s yet another thing I disagree with. MBS lets you select multiple gateways, hatcheries, or any other production buildings at once. What I think this really means is less hotkeys to worry about. Macro certainly has been made easier (especially with the new rally attack), but it isn’t something I find has lowered the skill ceiling. If a player makes 400 Zerglings, but your opponent has a good mix of colossus, zealots, or carriers, the player with the Zergling army will be destroyed barring a Nydus canal (at a similar unit cap). And the fact still remains that you should never let your opponent make 200 of anything!

You can produce units in a more efficient manner, but all the strategy is still there. If a player forgets to use the previously mentioned macro mechanics, he/she will also be at a very strong disadvantage.

Conclusion

I think the game is deserving of the title Starcraft 2. Many of the originals bad interface chokepoints have been fixed, thus making it a bit easier for players new to the series to jump in. Blizzard however also kept E-sports a very important priority, and has maintained a level of multi-tasking that certainly is not easy to master. I think we’ll be seeing plenty of exciting games from lots of Starcraft pros like Jaedong, Flash, Bisu, etc. should they choose to switch over. This game is new, gorgeous, has excellent music, and certainly has a competitive edge to it. There are more -hard- counters than the original, so the way the strategies need to be implemented are different.

Here are some Starcraft 2 Videos and Replays in 1080p! Hope you enjoy!

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The Art of Defence

Defence is an art that the best coaches in the world consider more important than any other aspect of the game. Covering positions, making timely tackles and even springing the offside trap well is key to stopping teams from scoring. After all, what good is a team that can’t defend a 2 or 3 goal lead even.

It was the Italians who decided to take it upon themselves to make defence an art-form, moving away from the physical aspect of defending and bringing in technical prowess. Until the Italians brought finesse into the picture, defending was all about out-muscling the opposition and crunching tackles.

It was the capability to constrict space and restrict movement that led to the rise of the Catenaccio style of play.

HELENIO HERRERA

Not many may remember his name but Helenio Herrera was a French-Argentine player and, later, manager who was one of the biggest names in football coaching during the mid-20th century. Having played for teams like RC Casablanca and Stade Francais, Herrera retired from club football in 1945.

Herrera took up coaching and moved to Spain, where he became the team manager for Real Valladolid, Atletico Madrid, CD Malaga and even the likes of FC Barcelona. It was after his stint for Barcelona, in 1960, that Herrera moved to Inter Milan.

THE RISE OF THE CATENACCIO

It was during his stay at Inter Milan that Herrera decided to modify the way his team defended. He shifted to a 5-3-2 formation to improve his counter attacking style of play. A firm believer in hard work and strong work ethics, Herrera was known as the pioneer of psychological motivational techniques including team pep-talks.

Herrera also introduced the no-smoking & -drinking policy as well as controlling the diet of his players to make them true professionals. Herrera was also known to suspend a player for telling the media, during a press conference, «We came to play in Rome» instead of «We came to win in Rome».

A hard man, Herrera was slightly defensive in his playing style although his form of the Catenaccio was not as defensive as some the future mutations of the formation, when applied by Italian architects.

One of Herrera’s full-backs, the great Giacinto Facchetti, was testimony to the attacking style of Herrera’s Catenaccio that prevailed in that Inter Milan team. The team was built around the defence, with its main role being to absorb the pressure from the opposition before launching lightning-quick counter attacks.

Using his wing backs to overlap the midfield, Herrera completely transformed the way the world looked at attacking football. Not giving away too much at the back, the team became famous for squeezing out 1-0 wins, leading to the nickname Verrou, meaning «Door Bolt».

HERRERA’S LEGACY

Known as «Herrera’s Inter», the team would go on to win the 1963, 65 & 66 league titles, the 1964 & 65 European Champions Cup as well as the Intercontinental cup in both those seasons. Herrera also became the first coach to go on and coach three separate national teams, ending his career with a 48.57% winning record.

In his 908 games as a manager, which included teams like Inter Milan, AS Roma, Barcelona, Atletico Madrid and CF Os Belenenses, Herrera lost just 241 games while drawing 226. In his 12-club coaching career, Herrera ended with a negative goal difference only three times – with Real Valladolid (-21), AS Roma (-1) and Rimini (-22). Each team was too weak at the time although Herrera did transform Roma into a championship winning team, getting the 1969 Italian Cup with a sub-standard line-up and his famous Catenaccio style of football.

THE «DOOR BOLT»

Unlike popular conception, the Catenaccio was not built to shut out opposition. The entire concept of play was to allow the opposition to attack, relentlessly even, before suddenly attacking on the counter. The team would play with five at the back, in a «V-shaped» formation, with the Libero or sweeper at the centre. As the opponents entered the «V», their attack would be narrowed down, restricting movement and space.

Once the ball changed possession, the defending team had a wingback on either side, already ahead of the advancing opposition’s midfield. That meant that the team could now push out, rapidly, by playing the ball out to these wingbacks, who would have loads of space to exploit.

EARLY MUTATIONS

While the Catenaccio was, itself, a mutation of the 5-4-1 system invented by Karl Rappan for the Swiss national team, the formation underwent a lot of transformation itself. Teams reverted to the original «Rappan-style» by playing the sweeper just in front of the goalkeeper and stationing a flat back-four in front.

Nereo Rocco, coach of Calcio Padova in the 1950s, was another who exploited the system. With three-flat defenders who man-marked the opposition, Rocco would play a playmaker in the middle, just ahead of the defence, alongside two wingers. While these three weren’t the actual midfield, Rocco’s style would use the sweeper behind the central defence as well, to double-team the stronger players.

The midfield would be in front of these three, with a solitary striker up front, leading to a 1-3-3-3 formation.

While Herrera also focussed on man-marking with four of his defenders, his defence was flexible in that it swung from right or left to make it a flat line on most times. This meant that four defenders, aid by the midfield, would effectively man-mark the opposition, which had already been herded through the middle. That left the remaining fifth defender – always a wingback, free to make runs on the counter.

ENFORCED DOWNFALL

Catenaccio had become the flavour of the month, in the 60s and 70s, catching the fancy of every coach on the world scene. However, it was one man who’s style of play brought Catenaccio to its knees – Rinus Michels.

When faced with the tight man-marking of the Catenaccio, Michels decided to remove the whole concept of playing footballers in fixed positions. He removed the boundaries that separated attackers, midfielders and defenders, teaching all his players to play in all positions. As attackers fell back to the midfield, or even defence, their man-markers were unable to leave their posts and follow in pursuit.

The fact that Michels had the crop of players that he did, to implement such a technique, was the only reason Total Football became a reality.

Catenaccio was no longer the primary choice anywhere as Total Football, or replicas of it, began dismantling defences with their speed and movement. Mediocre coaches, who followed rather than researched, were left with no choice but to fall to the wayside.

CATENACCIO MODIFICATIONS

Coaches who preached the Herrera principle looked to counter Total Football with a modification to the Catenaccio’s man-marking formula. The answer was quite simple, in theory – Zona Mista.

The Zona Mista was a concept that incorporated man-marking and zone-marking into one strong defensive strategy. While the concept still used the four man defence with the roaming sweeper, the difference was in the way the midfield and the fullbacks supported the defence.

The two central defenders, in the heart of the defence, would play zone-marking. The midfield would have a defensive midfielder, who was required to help out the defence by falling back. A central midfielder would play in front of the defensive midfielder while a winger (usually on the right flank), would support in attack.

Two strikers would play up front, one on the wide left, with one in the centre. The position of the wide striker was determined by the position of the winger – both being on opposite flanks. The winger would act as an additional striker while the wide striker would float in to make it a two-pronged attack.

When defending, the wide striker would come in to cover for the central midfielder as the latter would drop into a defensive position.

ZONA MISTA IN REAL LIFE

Italy – 1982

The most famous application of this formation was in the 1982 FIFA World Cup when Italy went into the tournament with this brand new style of football. Gaetano Scirea played the role of the sweeper to perfection while the attacking left back was a young 18-year old, who would later go on to become one of the greatest defenders of all time – Giuseppe Bergomi.

Gabriele Oriali played as the defensive midfielder, just in front of Fulvio Collovati and the man who stopped a young Diego Maradona – Claudio Gentile. Marco Tardelli played as the central midfielder while Bruno Conti was the creative genius behind Italy’s Zona Mista success.

While Antonio Cabrini played at the front wide position, it was Paolo Rossi who came into the main striker’s position.

Italy’s success led to an increased use of the Zona Mista although the application remained mostly in the Italian leagues. Teams, in Europe, found it hard to beat this fantastic combination of man- and zone-marking, keeping the Italians ahead of the rest. However, there was always the need of a great striker to take care of the few chances that this format would create – something that most teams lacked.

Italy – 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2004

More recently, Cesare Maldini employed the Catenaccio form of play in Italy’s 1998 FIFA World Cup campaign. Needless to say, Italy played defensively, without creating too many waves, eventually getting kicked out in the Round of 16, through penalties. His successor, Giovanni Trapattoni, also employed the same tactics in the 2002 FIFA World Cup as well as in the 2004 European Championships.

In both cases, Italy failed to make any significant progress although Trapattoni would go on to prove his critics wrong by leading Portuguese side, Benfica to the league title.

Dino Zoff, whose team successfully used the Zona Mista in 1982, was the Italian coach in Euro 2000 when Italy went in with the same tactics. This time, Zoff managed to take the team to the finals of the tournament, losing to France through a Golden Goal.

Greece – 2004

Greece used the same format under Otto Rehhagel, at the 2004 European Championships, and successfully so. Greece won the title with numerous 1-0 wins through the knockout stages, all thanks to a heavily defensive style of play.

BAD PUBLICITY

The Catenaccio was often on the receiving end of criticism from the rest of Europe primarily due to the boring style of football that it promoted. The Italians were said to have made the game «unattractive» however practitioners of this form of football always had results to further their faith in the system.

In most cases, the reason behind the criticism was said to be the inability of most teams to break down such defences, especially in crucial European ties, leading to a loss or a draw that they could ill-afford.

THE MODERN DAY SCENARIO

Catenaccio is a dormant formation today. With both man-marking and the sweeper position going out of style, what with the faster pace and television coming into the picture, teams are rarely known to implement such a format today.

You may see the odd variation of this formation when weaker teams go up against stronger opposition however the success of the Catenaccio or the Zona Mista is largely dependent on the quality of the defenders and the wingbacks.

The more physical format of the Catenaccio finds few followers even in the technical format of the Italian league while other formations, such as the 4-1-2-1-2 (midfield diamond) and even the 4-3-2-1 (Christmas tree) formations can be attributed, albeit loosely, to the Catenaccio.

Teams that go down a man or more, are also known to exhibit similar playing patterns although the true form of Catenaccio remains buried under a pile of demands for attacking play.

MISUSE OF THE TERM

In today’s scenario, you often find commentators, even some pundits, refer to the Italian game as the Catenaccio style of football. The latest example was the game between Barcelona and Inter Milan, at Camp Nou, during the second leg of the 2009-10 UEFA Champions League semi-finals.

Unfortunately, Jose Mourinho’s tactics were nothing like the Catenaccio style, albeit defensive. Down to ten men, Inter simply held a lower midfield to aid their defence, nothing more. They did was what needed and even Barcelona, with all their firepower, couldn’t break through. It has to be said that while Mourinho knew exactly what he was doing, there was absolutely no connection with the Catenaccio style of defence.

Commentators, especially Englishman, are known to refer to the Italian defensive style of football as Catenaccio, irrespective of whether the team follows the format or not. Catenaccio has become synonymous with defensive play although few understand the true meaning of the term, sadly, even the pundits make mistakes.

At the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Italy were down to 10-men while playing Australia in the Round of 16. They defended heavily until a winner came in the form of a Francesco Totti penalty, late in the game. An English newspaper, «The Guardian», famously wrote, «The timidity of Italy’s approach had made it seem that Helenio Herrera, the high priest of Catenaccio, had taken possession of the soul of Marcello Lippi.»

What the reporter failed to notice was that 10-men Italy were playing in a 4-3-2 formation which was just a man short of the regular 4-4-2 that they had started with – Daniele De Rossi, the midfielder who was dismissed.

THE FINAL WORD

Like all good things, Catenaccio also had to come to an end. With its end, like with everything else, rose many new formats that are, till date, being practiced by coaches around the world. While the Catenaccio may have been laid to rest with the modern day television’s demand for exciting football, coaches will always fall back to their learning of this system when struggling with their backs against the wall.

Until the next time a British commentator mentions «Catenaccio» in the wrong place, Happy Defending!!!

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Manchester New Hampshire Information and Details About The City

Manchester is the major urban centre inside the state of New Hampshire and north of Boston in a region containing the states of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. Having a population of over 109,000 people The city of Manchester ranked thirteenth within a report on the one hundred best cities to live in CNN.MONEY.com, not to mention has been voted the second most tax friendly metropolis in the states by Kiplinger’s. Manchester features one of the fastest expanding economies in New England.

Manchester features a four-season climate together with wintry winters as well as warm summers, springtime and fall are generally crisp and brief transitions.

Manchester presents several ethnic activities at the historic Palace Theatre, the Currier Museum of Art and the New Hampshire Institute of Art. The Verizon Wireless Arena is a civic center which serves a range of events, from sporting events to concerts with major recording artists, comedians, theatrical productions as well as family focused programs and fairs.

Manchester school system has four public high schools, four public middle schools and fourteen public elementary schools. In addition there are lots of private and faith based schools. You can find 7 post secondary university in the Manchester area.

The city is served by 4 newspaper publishers, a New Hampshire public tv station and one commercial television station, WMUR-TV Channel 9, an ABC affiliate, as well as varied AM and FM radio stations.

Manchester hosts Manchester Fischer Cats, a minor baseball team, and the Manchester Monarchs, AHL professional ice hockey.

For transportation Manchester has the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport, which is serviced by almost all major airlines, with the largest share used by Southwest Airlines. The airport features international service via Air Canada to Ontario and Toronto. Public transportation is supplied by Manchester Transit Authority that runs buses through the city. Concord Trailways and Boston Express run commuter services to Boston along with other regions of the state.

Key highways include Interstates 93 and 293, and the Everett Turnpike which are multi-lane highways and connect the metropolitan area to Concord and the White Mountains to the north, and Nashua and Boston to the south. NH 101 is a 4 lane highway eastbound from Manchester to Hampton and beaches on the seacoast as well as Maine and Interstate 95 to the north shore of Massachusetts. Westbound NH 101 is a two lane highway serving as the main artery to Keene, the Monadnock region and points west.

Manchester features 2 significant retail spots: downtown Manchester and South Willow Street. The Mall of New Hampshire is found on South Willow Street, exceeding 125 stores.

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World Cup Goalkeepers – Jens Lehmann

Born in Essen, Germany in 1969, Jens Lehmann’s soccer career kicked off in 1989 with FC Schalke where he played for almost 10 years before moving on to AC Milan in 1998.

Said to be one of the best goalkeepers in the world, Lehmann created a name for himself while with Schalke. However, after signing up with Milan, his performance took a dip and he was dropped from the squad after just five matches. He made a decision to move back to Germany and signed up with Borussia Dortmund where he went on to win the German League title in 2002. Lehmann then went on to sign up with the Gunners in July 2003 and was seen as Arsene Wenger’s answer to replace the ageing David Seaman.

During his first season with Arsenal, Lehmann played in every match and the Gunners went on to clinch the FA Premier League title without dropping a match. Lehmann, who many say has also undergone stringent mental training to reach his potential often comes out of his goal to intercept passes. He was man of the match during his club’s performance against Manchester United in the 2005 FA Cup Final after he made numerous brilliant saves to keep the score at 0-0 after extra time.

Lehmann then went on to save a fierce shot from Paul Scholes during the penalty shoot-out, handing a 5-4 victory to Arsenal.

However, one doubt remained on the mind of fans as they pondered his temperament following several «incidents» during the games. The German goalkeeper first donned his gloves for the national team in February 1998 in a match against Oman and to date has earned more than 25 caps for his country. He has however been in a constant tussle for a place between the posts with Oliver Kahn, from Bayern Munich. As many will be comparing him with Kahn, Lehmann will require a lot of mental strength to deal with the pressure. So, mental training should become an important part of any footballer’s training program today.

However, luck was on his side and according to a recent statement from the German Football Federation, Lehmann has won the race to keep goal for his country. The issue of who would don the Number 1 jersey has dominated the German football scene and the pressure was intense on national coach Jurgen Klinsmann to make a decision.

Public polls had recently favoured Lehmann, whom many said was in fine and consistent form.

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