How To Handle Your Nasty Self-Criticism

I’ve received multiple emails from readers sharing what triggers their self-criticism. Self-criticism can be one of the most MASSIVE obstacles to tackle, because it underlies everything.

What you’re telling yourself will determine the way you feel, the behaviors and actions you take and the words you say to others. Your «invisible scripts» shape your experience of your world. They are the paintbrushes on your life canvas (OK, that was slightly cheesy, but you get the point).

The sneaky thing with these invisible scripts is that they are… well, invisible.

Generally, you don’t notice them. They run around in the background of your mind all day long, and occur to you like they’re real.

Your invisible scripts sound like an observation of reality, but they’re actually a biased judgement coming from a part of you that wants to keep you behaving in the same way you always have.

Here’s a few recent comments from readers about their self-criticism or invisible scripts. I’ve bolded the invisible scripts for emphasis. These are the things that these readers are telling themselves and believing that it’s reality:

«If I have one lick of something that I feel is a «bad food» I start to feel I have failed and throw in the towel. I know logically I cannot be perfect, but I use that inability to let a binge take over. It makes no sense.«

«I teach Pilates and actually TRAIN people around health and fitness… and then I can’t even control myself! I come home and somehow start eating, then get so mad at myself for being a weak failure. I don’t know what’s wrong with me.«

«Its like ever since I moved to the US and started having kids, I lost touch with myself or something. I don’t have much time to myself and when the kids finally go to bed I just want to eat. I know that it’s a bad habit but I can’t stop doing it.«

«I will be good for a week and eat healthy and then I just lose it and say hell with it and hate myself. I know better but it doesn’t matter when I am alone and have a weak moment. It would be nice to have one piece of chocolate or something but I can’t do that. Once I start, I don’t stop.«

Most of the time, a part of you knows that what you’re telling yourself probably isn’t ACTUALLY true, but you believe it anyway.

Which makes total sense if part of you is really used to beating yourself up.

Naturally, that part is going to be looking for ways to be right that you’re not good enough, a failure, or whatever it is that you tell yourself when you’re being critical. So when you eat something that one part of you has judged to be «bad», the other part of you will rejoice in victory because it’s RIGHT that you always throw in the towel.

The trick is to notice when that part of you is looking to be right.

When you hear these negative thoughts running in your head, take note. Observe what’s happening. You don’t need to stop the thoughts (or feel doubly bad that you are allowing the negative thoughts to override everything). Just notice them.

You can appreciate that it’s coming from a part of your ego or your «animal brain» that’s just doing its job. As your ego or your «animal brain», it’s #1 priority is to protect you.

It’s trying to keep you in the same patterns because those are trusted, reliable patterns you’ve lived most of your life. It doesn’t want you to do something radically different, like enjoy the pleasure of the food for what it is and NOT beat yourself up over it.

Our minds are funny things.

When you notice this part of you, you can see it for what it is. You don’t have to react to it unless you choose to. If you choose to react to it as you normally would, you’re making a conscious decision. This puts you in the driver’s seat because you’re making a choice rather than reacting on autopilot.

This is very similar to when you have urges to eat when you aren’t physically hungry, or to overeat. The urges are being driven by this same part, the «animal» brain, that’s trying to protect you by comforting you, nurturing and feeding you because—for whatever reason—it feels triggered.

A habitual response to these urges, just like the invisible scripts, is to react and do what you’ve done before. Whether its beating yourself up, calling yourself a failure or eating the entire box of ice cream.

The hard thing to do with cravings or urges to eat is to notice the impulse to react and choose to let it run its course without taking action.

Likewise, the hard thing to do with nasty self-criticism is to notice it, choose to recognize where it’s coming from, thank it for trying to protect you and then let it pass on by.

It’s hard because, in the moment, it feels SO REAL.

And when you’re that triggered, if you’re like me, you don’t want to let it pass. You want to be bitchy, nasty and down on yourself because you think you deserve it.

So here’s a challenge for you this week:

See if you can find the «invisible script» or voice telling you that you’re failing (or you’re weak, or ugly, or whatever your word weapon of choice is). You don’t have to take it seriously. You can just listen to it like you would listen to a little yippy dog at your ankles. You know it’s there, but you don’t have to engage with it unless you choose to.

Notice how often you hear it.

Notice what you’re doing when you hear it.

See if you can zoom out for a moment when you hear it. If this is your «animal brain» telling you this message in order to keep you behaving in a certain way and feeling bad about yourself, it’s not real. It’s a triggered, programmed impulse. Congratulate yourself on being able to recognize it.

Congratulating yourself in the face of nasty self-criticism is the opposite of what you will feel compelled to do. But you’ve got the winning hand: you can’t transform it until you can see it.

When you can see it for what it is, it will lose steam. The more you notice the criticism and choose to not indulge it, the easier it will be to let it pass and put your attention elsewhere.

Can you spot your scripts?

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Tips to Consider For Job Searching

For a newly grad individual it is both scary and exciting to do your first job search. Sometimes it may lead you to heights you did not expect at all or sometimes to places you might regret but here are no regrets in finding a job that will open your senses and provide you with financial freedom. For those who are planning to embark on the very important job search, here are some tips to get started and of course, to be successful.

• Have you made that resume? The resume is essential for your entire job search. Be it person to person or through the internet, a good resume will ensure that you have your arsenal with you. Aside from your arsenal, do you have your portfolio with you? For more creative jobs and for those who documented their success or even achievements, a portfolio or a file that is carefully organized is essential.

• Know yourself. Sometimes, even if you are a graduate, there are some things like hobbies that seem to have developed throughout the years in your college life that made more of an impact on you. If you have taken units and had firsthand experience with these hobbies and there are available portfolios or other essential information about it, then bring it and maybe you can find a job as an assistant or any other kind of entry level job.

• For the new grads, a good way to start your job search is to join a job bulletin site where thousands of jobs are available to you. Post your resume and make an account and specify your specific areas of expertise.

• Do well in your internship. It is best to start early in your job search. If you have worked with a good company as an intern then you already have a great start. Work well with the people and make sure you are not forgettable (in a good way) by making your work shine and your personality pleasing. You do not need to be loud.

• Let the job sites search for you! There are sites that are geared for employers to see how you pitch yourself. Sites like Pitch your talent is a great site for applicants to put their best foot forward and play with their strengths.

• In a job set up, weaknesses in your work can be revealed as a result of your education or state of mind. It is important to know how to lessen the bad or negative attitudes and weaknesses to rake havoc in your job search, this could limit your choices and make you less confident about job finding.

• It is also good to explore and market yourself using blogs, social networking sites and other forms of interaction. Do not be afraid if you know you have what it takes to do something spectacular.

Job searching is a very exciting thing and with the right attitude and the things to say, you will not become part of the statistics of new graduates who cannot find jobs. Sometimes, it is all about marketing yourself and really playing your cards well. Do not be afraid if you know you can do it. Maximize your strengths but always be humble.

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London – A Cornucopia Of History And Culture

The city of the London is one of the biggest worldwide with endless history; beautiful attractions; ideal spots for renowned activities; impressive architectural buildings and artwork. More than 2000 years of blossoming history has contributed to what makes the bustling city of the United Kingdom a world class destination.

Whether it is business or tourism, the tremendous attraction for international visitors is really due to the plethora of lifestyle and culture. Historical sites stand alongside their modern-day equals. London is the ideal destination for anyone who loves art, music, architecture, entertainment, culture and history.

The moment you arrive in this city you will discover that all the airports: Gatwick, Heathrow, Luton, Stansted and City airport provide excellent amenities for visitors. There are taxis readily available to take you to any destination you want both to and from the airport.

When you are exploring this city you can check out the River Thames as well as take a river cruise to enjoy the city sights. If you take a stroll along the river banks at night this will offer you a pleasurable experience as well. Some other tourist attractions including the London Eye, Buckingham Palace, Big Ben, Tower of London, Westminster Abbey, Madame Tussauds, British Museum and much more, all of which shows off the history as well as modern-day development in this city.

Museums and galleries hold collections ever since London came into existence. The renowned works of world-class artists and famous authors are displayed in the galleries and museums to date. Some of the famous galleries in London are The Tate Modern; The National Portrait Gallery; The Tate Britain and Trafalgar Square's National Gallery.

London parks provide excellent entertainment for individuals of any age. Hyde Park, The Royal Botanic Gardens and Kensington Gardens are a few of them. Some other places to check out include Trafalgar Square, Leicester Square, Covent Garden and Piccadilly Circus.

This city is also among the world's best locations for providing high quality education as well as opportunities for different professional careers and business. With international and national Universities, you will be guaranteed good standard education whether you are a native or an overseas student who want to study in London.

When it comes to sporting activities, London hosted a number of events and tournaments. There are stadiums in this city to host cricket, football and many other international sporting events. The 2012 Olympics is also scheduled for London, which will make it the third time that this event is going to be held in this city.

Ensure that you are making the necessary plans to travel to this city and get a taxi to visit various attractions and events without hassle.

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My Local Victim of the Titanic Disaster

Alfred Allsop was a victim of the Titanic disaster who was a native of my region. He was an electrical engineer, and as such he helped to keep the lights on for as long as possible while the passengers located the lifeboats, the consequence of which he went down with the ship and his body was never recovered. This is my small tribute to him.

Alfred Samuel Allsop was born in 1876, at 96 Brunswick Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. He was the youngest of four sons in a family of ten children to George Foster Allsop, a travelling salesman, and his wife, Elizabeth (formerly Walker), the daughter of an Irish teacher. They married in 1860 at Manchester Cathedral, where most of their children were christened. One of Alfred’s sisters had died before he was born. By 1891 the family had moved to 29 Broughton Lane, Lower Broughton, Salford, and Alfred was well known in the district. He became interested in the power of electricity at an early age, spending much of his time riding on the electric tram cars in Manchester and he was a regular visitor at the Salford power station in Bloom Street, which supplied the bulk of traction supply for central Manchester, plus lighting and power demand.

When he was fifteen he began an apprenticeship with H H Hall and Company of Liverpool, who was pioneering the use of ships telephones, followed by employment with Campbell and Isherwood of Bootle, where he worked in the development of electrical switchboards. This was followed by short spells at the Hame Electric Company and the Northern Electric Company, both of Liverpool. He left Manchester to take up an appointment on the Baltic, and joined the White Star Line in August 1904 as assistant electrician aboard the Celtic II. He later served on the Majestic and Oceanic, in which it is said he crossed the Atlantic about a hundred times before joining the Titanic.

He had an inventive mind, and it was he who developed an idea for a multi-clutched lifeboat winch powered by an electric motor, which would allow fully laden lifeboats to be lifted from a ship straight into the water. This invention became ‘The Allsop Electric Lifeboat Crane’, but he did not see his device go into production. When the White Star Line moved their headquarters to Southampton he moved to that town. He was one of the transfer crew which brought the Titanic to Southampton on 2 April, where he signed-on as second electrician.

The RMS Titanic was a British registered four-funnelled ocean liner built for the Trans-Atlantic passenger and mail service between Southampton and New York. Constructed at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, to have sailed on ‘The voyage of the century’ aboard the Titanic, the world’s largest and most luxurious vessel afloat at that time, was like being one of the first people to fly on Concorde. It was described at the time as ‘a floating palace’ – Mayfair and Bel Air on water! People from all walks of life began embarking on the Titanic at Southampton on 10 April 1912, for what was to be the trip of a lifetime on the ship’s maiden voyage across the north Atlantic; many were looking forward to starting new lives in the United States.

However, just before midnight on Sunday, 14 April 1912, it began to send out signals of distress stating: ‘We have struck an ice berg.’ The ship had been steaming at a speed other crews would have envied at that time, when it collided with an enormous iceberg which stripped off her bilge under the waterline for more than a hundred yards, opened up five of the front compartments and flooded the coal bunker servicing one of the boilers. She sank about three hours later. There were sixteen lifeboats and four collapsible dinghies, which were insufficient, as a consequence of which two out of every three of the 2,200 people on board perished.

Alfred was doing the last shift of the day from ten until one minute to twelve, so he was on duty in the generator room when the Titanic hit the iceberg. However, he remained at his post when all was lost, helping to keep the lights burning to aid the passengers to get to the lifeboats. It was estimated that the ship’s power would last no more than an hour, yet Alfred and his colleagues kept the power on for two hours and forty minutes, and the lights stayed on until a few minutes before the ship sank. Without their self-sacrifice power would have been lost and the death toll would have been considerably higher.

The CS Carpathia was in the region, and on receiving a distress signal it immediately set a course towards the disaster area. After working through dangerous ice fields it arrived at the scene at four o’clock in the morning of 15 April. Some people, mostly woman and children, had escaped from the ship in lifeboats and the Carpathia saved over seven hundred people. A Carpathia spokesman reported the scene as they arrived at the area where the Titanic went down: ‘The Sea was dotted with bodies as far as one could see, and the decks were covered with them. Everybody had on a lifebelt and bodies floated very high in the water in spite of the sodden clothes and things in pockets. Apparently the people had lots of time and discipline must have been splendid, for some had on their pyjamas, two and three shirts, two pairs of pants, two vests, two jackets and an overcoat. In some pockets a quantity of meat and biscuits were found, while in the pockets of most of the crew quite a lot of tobacco and matches besides keys to the various lockers and stateroom doors were found. On this day we buried fifteen bodies some of them very badly smashed and bruised.’

The Mackay-Bennett searched the disaster area a few days later and buried 116 bodies at sea, and the ship arrived back in Nova Scotia with 190 bodies on board. Some victims were buried in two separate mass graves, while others were claimed by their families and transported home.

Alfred’s body was never recovered, however, he is named on the Liverpool Titanic and Engineers memorial, and there is a brass memorial plaque at St Faith’s Church in Great Crosby, which is dedicated: ‘to the memory of the Chief Engineer and his Engine Room staff.’ He is named on the Southampton Engineers Memorial in East Park, on the Glasgow Institute of Marine Engineers memorial and on the Institute of Marine Engineers memorial in London.

He is believed to have married a woman named Hilda not long before he died, and they are said to have had a child named Philip Alfred. This comes from the fact that in 1914, a woman stating her name to be Hilda claimed from the Titanic Relief Fund and was granted one pound: ‘for expenses due to the illness of her little boy.’ However, there is no registration listing for any marriage for Alfred, and there is no birth registration for his son. No wife and son have ever been traced.

Tu tienda especializada de Camisetas de fútbol retro y vintage. Compra Camisetas de fútbol antiguas, replicas auténticas. Moda clásica. by James W Bancroft

Most Popular Soccer Players – Ronaldo, Beckham, Mia Hamm, Brandy Chastain

If you type those words into your search engine, the answer you will get right now is probably going to be: Cristiano Ronaldo. With looks that rivals super star, David Beckham and the talent to boot, Ronaldo is a superstar soccer standout that actually can play the game. Like most little boys, he started playing when he was young, around age eight but really started to be noticed two years later. Now, at the relatively advanced age of twenty-two, Ronaldo has racked up 53 goals in over 200 matches. Impressive numbers at any age.

And what about Beckham? His move from the UK to Los Angeles was supposed to spark US interest in the sport of soccer. He is one good looking man, but his injuries may well keep him from really making the sport as popular here as it is worldwide. His professional career began at sixteen when he started played for the Manchester United team. He was asked to join Britain’s World Cup Team in 1997. Even when he is not playing soccer, Beckham is a popular figure, his endorsement deals and stunning good looks make him very, very well known.

For me, the word «soccer» will always make me think of Mia Hamm. Her stats are impressive and not just when compared to women- her stats are phenomenal across the board. Mia started playing at age 12 and just three years later played with the US National Team- making her the youngest to ever play for her country at that level. She is one of only two women listed on soccer great Pele’s list of » The 125 Best Soccer Players of All Times» and has won the FIFA Player of the Year Award twice. ( In 2001 and 2002). Hamm scored 158 goals in 275 matches in her career and played in the Women’s World Cup twice (1991 and 1999). She was also a member of the gold medal Olympic team in 1996. On a personal level, Mia Hamm has always been described as the quiet, and unassuming member of the team. She is an excellent role model, especially for young women who are bombarded with images of scantily clad, morally bankrupt pop stars.

Of course, if we are going to talk about Mia Hamm, we have to talk about Brandy Chastain as well. Even people who could not tell a soccer ball from a bocce ball knows who Brandy is. After a thrilling victory, a triumphant Ms. Chastain whipped off her top, revealing her sport bra and sparking a veritable media frenzy. Over 90,000 people were in attendance for that event, not to mention the people watching at home and the countless replays. It has been on a variety of sports related count downs, including «Best Sports Moment Ever» to name just one. Not only did she spark interest in soccer for young girls, but the sale of sports bras jumped dramatically.

Every sport has their popular stars. They are not always the flashy players, or the best looking. Sometimes they are the players that bring something extra to the sport and to the world around them. A little touch of class, or a generous soul. Those are the players that win hearts and then keep them forever.

Puedes comprar todas las camisetas oficiales de fútbol en futbolmania, la tienda de las mejores Camisetas de fútbol – Devolución gratis. by Danny Ang