Divorce – 5 Financial Steps To Take BEFORE Getting A Divorce

Marriage is defined as «the state of being united as spouses in a consensual and contractual relationship recognized by law». When two people enter into a marriage the expectations are that it will last for the rest of their lifetimes, for better or worse, until death do them part. However, some marriages – as hard as people may try – don’t always last a lifetime.

A marriage may result in separating ways and end in divorce regardless of how hard one or both parties try to make it work. This can be a giant roller coaster of emotions. With everything going on there is one extremely important thing many people neglect to think about… YOU. If you find yourself going through a divorce you need to look out for yourself and your financial independence. Too often we see a separating spouse blindsided by certain financial realities. Take a look at these 5 steps BEFORE getting a divorce to ensure you are looking out for your own interest before the divorce finalizes.

1. Audit your current financial situation

Divorces can be unexpected and abrupt. They can also be prolonged and only come to fruition when a step is finally taken to formalize it. Regardless of sudden or more prolonged, there is an urgency with awareness of your current financial situation as a married couple.

With some couples, one person handles the finances more than the other person. While this is not recommended, it does inevitably happen. And in some cases of couples separating we see females who are left in the dark about the financial state of the two as a couple. Whether it be because the husband assumed the role or the wife is staying home with the kids, it is more common for the woman to be less aware of the couple’s financial state. However, this can undoubtedly go both ways and both should take this step into consideration regardless of which role.

This is something you need to protect yourself from. If you know that a divorce is coming, you will be initiating a divorce soon or you just had the bomb dropped that your husband or wife wants a divorce, take this step with extreme urgency. Print out or make copies of bank, brokerage and retirement statements, credit card statements, trusts, or joint investments. Have hard copy evidence of any and all of assets of the marriage.

Why do this?

The hope is that the divorce will be an amicable one, however, when emotions run high, one party may do something out of spite. We’ve seen instances of a spouse trying to shield assets from the other, change account authorizations to restrict the other spouses access, or hide any information that would benefit them-self to do so in the event of a divorce.

So how do you combat this? First start with educating yourself on your current financial situation. If you have a financial advisor you trust, set an appointment with them. If you want to consider a different financial advisor that is independent of your spouse, make an appointment accordingly.

Be aware of any outstanding debt there may be. Sometimes one side of the couple is blissfully unaware of the amount of debt their spouse is racking up while they are still married. This can come out when the divorce is in process and may leave both spouses responsible for the debt regardless of who created it.

Its far too important to be prepared with documentation in case your spouse decides to try and change log-in information etc. preventing you from getting access to these records later on. Do this with urgency to protect yourself and take control of your financial independence.

2. Establish your own credit

In the event that a couple shares credit card accounts, it may be likely that the account is held in one person’s name while the spouse has authorized access to use the credit card. You may be unaware that the account is held solely in your spouses name. This information will need to be figured out because simply having your name on a credit card does not mean that you are establishing any credit. Typically we’ve seen this with a spouse who does not currently work. They have a credit card under the working spouse’s account because of this.

Why do this?

When a divorce occurs, this becomes important. Having a credit card in your own name helps build your credit. You will be better able to be approved for a new mortgage, based on your own qualifications, if you decide you want to purchase a home on your own, or any loan that you may need. This should be done before the divorce proceedings happen. Especially if your spouse earns significantly more than you do or if you didn’t have an income while married. It is a lot easier to get approved for one while still married with a joint income. Also, a credit card can help with the day-to-day expenditures when you’re still figuring everything out in the divorce settlement.

3. Review and revise beneficiaries, wills, health proxy, power of attorneys and other estate plans

When two people get married, it is not uncommon for them to make each other their beneficiary, health proxy, power of attorney, executor etc. When you’re married, you want your spouse to be the beneficiary and you believe they will carry your wishes out should something happen to you. This changes when a divorce occurs and should be looked at carefully.

Why Do This?

When you know you’ll be separating ways it is best to review and revise these. Change each of them to reflect the current situation. You may want to consider using a family member of your own or children if any are of age to do so. It is best to review them with a trusted individual and most financial advisors would be willing to help you with this process.

4. Adjust your budget for your new financial independence

Many married couples have two incomes coming into the household. You get used to spending at a certain level without feeling any financial pressure. This level is typically more than you would be spending when you were single and operating on your own salary. When you are entering into a divorce, it’s time to adjust your budget and become acutely aware of where your money is going. To do this, start by taking an objective look at what your new budget will be. Look at the expenses that are necessary and then look at ones that you would be able to eliminate. Create a new budget you can commit to on your own.

Why do This?

All too often we see a recently divorced woman or man trying to live the same lifestyle as they did when married. It can be a harsh reality when they realize this can no longer happen. Any reduction in income takes some time to get used to. You may have to sacrifice shopping trips, golf outings, getting your nails done, or other luxuries you were able to comfortably afford as a married couple. Understand that life is changing. Doing this step will help you find your new financial independence and put you in the best position for your financial future.

5. Surround yourself with those who will support you

Going through a divorce most likely won’t be cut and dry. Any situation that involves emotions from 2 or more parties makes it difficult. Sometimes divorces are sudden… and some times it is a long time coming. No matter how the divorce has transpired, it is extremely important to surround yourself with people who support you. Especially in a time where a lot of decisions will need to be made.

Why do this?

You need to surround yourself with those concerned with your best interests. Divorces can hold feelings of resentment or distaste towards the other spouse. When emotions are all over, people may do things that they wouldn’t normally do, out of spite. Have the support behind you to make sure you stick up for yourself but also be there to tell you when it’s best to put your pride aside and come to an agreement.

In Conclusion:

Going through a divorce can be an emotional and even traumatic event. Just remember, it doesn’t define who you are. You WILL make it through this and your life WILL move on. Be mindful to protect yourself in the process and be confident that you can start again with new financial independence! Consider each of these 5 steps to take when getting divorced. Hold your support system close and don’t be afraid to call in some professional advice.

Most financial advisors will be able to guide you through this process and help you make good decisions that are in your best interest. If you are from Buffalo or Western New York, we would be happy to review your situation and offer suggestions. Call us at 716-662-4470 to schedule your free consultation.

Camisetas de fútbol Equipamiento, ropa y calzado deportivo . Compra online ahora con los mejores descuentos. by Chelsea Maderer

A Short Biography of Soccer Player – Sylvain Wiltord

His complete name is Sylvain Claude Wiltord. He was born on 10 May 1974 in Neuilly-sur-Marne, France. With the national side of French, Wiltord has been successful in Euro 2000 and achieved the final of FIFA World Cup in 2006. Wiltord’s playing position in the field is as Striker / Winger.

Wiltord have many experiences palying football with some clubs. In club level he played for Rennes in 1992-1997, Girondins Bordeaux in 1997-2000, Arsenal in 2000-2004, Lyon in 2004-2007, Rennes in 2007-2009, Marseille in 2009, and Metz 2010 till now.

On 10 February 1999, he made his first appearance for France winning 2-0 against England. On behalf of his national team, he has been capped 92 times, making 26 goals.

Wiltord stay put in the national team for the 2002 World Cup. He participated at Euro 2004 as well, playing 7 matches in the qualifying campaign with a great return of 6 goals. Lately, he was member of France team of Raymond Domenech that participated in the 2006 World Cup final in opposition to Italy.

During his career Wiltord achieved many honors as soccer player. And the honors include With Girondins de Bordeaux (French Ligue 1: 1998-99), With Arsenal, (FA Premier League: 2001/02, 2003/04, FA Cup: 2002, 2003, FA Community Shield: 2002), With Olympique Lyonnais (French Ligue 1: 2004/05, 2005/06, 2006/07). With his national team the honors include UEFA Euro 2000, FIFA Confederations Cup: 2001, 2003 (as Winner), and FIFA World Cup: 2006 (as Runner-up). And as individual honors are French Ligue 1 Top Scorer: 1998-99 (22 goals with Bordeaux), French Footballer of the Year: 1999, and FIFA Confederations Cup Top Scorer: 2001.

Comprar Camisetas de fútbol para adultos y niños desde 15 € y camisetas oficiales de equipos de fútbol. Clica y Recoge GRATUITO en tienda. by Philip Folsom

Covent Garden: Shop ‘Til You Drop

London is known for its neighborhoods – historic, diverse, and culturally rich, they make the city what it is today. One of the most exciting neighborhoods for tourists and locals alike is Covent Garden. This neighborhood is IT for shopping and nightlife and is packed on the weekends. It’s full to the brim with bars, boutiques and restaurants. This area on the eastern edge of London’s West End has Europe’s classic narrow streets and is quite dense, so you’ll never be far from something to eat or somewhere to explore. This neighborhood is home to London’s Theatreland, where you’ll find world-class dramas, musicals and opera. Visitors will recognize famous theaters like the Adelphi, the Savoy and the Drury Lane Theatre. Check out the Royal Opera House in person for last-minute opera night deals.

The heart of this neighborhood is called Covent Garden Market Piazza, a bustling and impressive covered shopping mall. Another important spot is Seven Dials where seven streets meet and form a busy square. It is a breeze to reach by public transportation. Covent Garden Tube Station is the closest and is on the Piccadilly line, as are Leicester Square and Holborn stations. Tottenham Court Road, Embankment, and Charing Cross stations will also put you within walking distance of this great neighborhood. There is truly something for everyone at this neighborhood – from upscale boutiques to pushcart vendors. The Apple Market specializes in handmade British craft pieces. The Jubilee Market has three different themes weekly including Antiques from Tuesday to Friday. Shoe addicts will flock to the shoe stores on Neal Street. There is even a specialty British dairy and a New Zealand Shop and Australia Shop. For the travel-crazy, Stanfords, the world’s largest map retailer, has their flagship store right here in this neighborhood complete with travel guides galore. If you’re a coffee drinker and are tired of Britain’s tea obsession, check out Monmouth Coffee and its upscale tasting room. If you need to relax after a full day of shopping and exploring, look no further than Sanctuary Spa. You’ll be sure to see a licensed street performer somewhere along your way, and maybe even some open-air classical music.

Besides the shopping and nightlife, there is actually a great selection of galleries and museums in this neighborhood as well, including the Photographer’s Gallery and London Transport Museum. Other area landmarks are St. Paul’s Church, completed in 1633, and the historic, glass-and-stone Charing Cross Station. There are all kinds of eateries to be found in Covent Garden, including a Mexican cantina, Italian gelato, wine bars and vegetarian/vegan locales. For a splurge dinner, try Joe Allen, a bistro famous for its grilled steaks and specialty meats.

After visiting the market and its variety of entertainment, you can easily walk to other famous London spots like Trafalgar Square, Bloomsbury and Soho. Be sure to visit the official website to check out contests and special offers – you just might win a theater ticket, a shopping spree or a spa package!

Tu tienda especializada de Camisetas de fútbol retro y vintage. Compra Camisetas de fútbol antiguas, replicas auténticas. Moda clásica. by Billie Grubb

Book Report: The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole

Book Title: The Secret Diary Of Adrian Mole

Book Genre: Novel presented through the form of a diary of a teenage boy called Adrian Mole

Author: Sue Townsend

A. PSYCHIC BOOK REPORT:

What I expect this book is about / will contain: As the title itself implies, this is a secret diary of the person named Adrian Mole. I expect to read some of his personal thoughts, beliefs and secrets. I assume that the book contains short notes about the boy’s every day activities, how the main character feels while doing them and what are the consequences of the actions taken by him.

Why?

I think that the diary format of this novel makes it very easy to read and understand. The dates written in the diary give us a clear idea of when exactly the action happened, where and who are the people to take part in certain activities.

B. NOTE ON THE AUTHOR: Susan Lillian Townsend is the creator of Britain’s best loved and bestselling diarist, Adrian Mole. She was born on 2nd April 1946 in Leicester and went to Glen Hills Primary School. She is an English novelist, playwright screenwriter and columnist, best known as the author of the Adrian Mole books. Her father was a postman and she was the eldest of five sisters. After failing her 11-plus exam, Townsend then went to the secondary modern South Wigston High School. She left school at the age of 15 and worked in a variety of jobs including factory worker and shop assistant. She married a sheet-metal worker and had three children by the time she was 22. She joined a writers’ group at the Phoenix Theater, Leicester in her thirties. She has four children: Sean, Daniel, Victoria and Elizabeth. At the time of writing the first Adrian Mole book, Townsend was living on the Saffron Lane Estate. The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole was reputedly based on her children’s experiences at Mary Linwood Comprehensive School in Leicester. Several of the teachers who appear in the book are based on actual staff who worked at the school in the early 1980 s. When the book was filmed, it was mostly filmed at a different school nearby. Mary Linwood Comprehensive was closed in 1997. The first two published stories appeared in a short-lived arts journal entitled simply magazine, the editing and production of which Townsend was involved. The first two books in the series appealed to many readers as a realistic and humorous treatment of the inner life of an adolescent boy. Townsend has suffered from diabetes for many years, as a result of which she was registered blind in 2001, and has woven this theme into her work. For her work she has been presented with several awards. On February 25, 2009, Leicester City Council announced that Townsend will be given the Honorary Freedom of Leicester. She is married and has four children and five grandchildren and still lives in Leicester.

C. POINT OF VIEW: Teenagers will always be teenagers. All of them have school and love problems, as well as problems with their parents. Although the book was originally written in 1982, ten years before I was even born, all the ideas and feelings in the book are still valid today.

D. TONE: ( How does the author feel toward her subject, her protagonist or perhaps even her audience? )

The author has made this book enjoyable and easy to read and understand. Through Adrian Mole she addresses all the teenagers in the world by telling them that this period of growing up and becoming mature could be difficult, yet interesting and funny.

E. SETTING:

1. TIME: (When is the book set? What characterized the time in question? )

The book is set in the 1980’s. The references to the Royal Wedding, Abba, Punks and Margaret Thatcher may be confusing to some younger readers. It makes you realize how little things change. The Sun, bad city schools, spots, school plays and Marmite are all part of everyday British life and will probably always be with us. One thing I would say is that there are so many references to uniquely British objects in this book that overseas readers might get confused. There are numerous references to PE shorts, Marmite, Spotted Dick, the Sunday Mirror, the RSPCA and so on.

2. PLACE: (What locations are included in the book? )

When we start reading the book, the first place we’re introduced to is Adrian’s house. According to him, the house where he lives has two floors. On the first floor there is the kitchen, where Adrian cooked a meal when both of his parents were ill. Apparently, the bedrooms are upstairs, because he said that he had to run upstairs and downstairs all day long to help them recover. There’s a small garden where the dog usually runs away. The house has a front door and a back door where Mr. Lucas ran away from. There is another house next to Adrian’s house. It’s Mr. and Mrs. Lucas’s house with a garden. The second location that Adrian takes us to is his school. It’s got a school dining room where the students have their lunch during break. Students had to wait in lines in order to get their meal. Next to describe is the old house of Bert Baxter. It is not clean and it smells horribly because of the fact that Bert Baxter smokes and drinks a lot. When Adrian gets the job of delivering newspapers, he gave a short description of the street where the wealthy people lived. He said that the houses were very big. The name of the street was Elm Tree Avenue. It was the street where Pandora lived with her family. Finally, the whole action in the book takes place in the city of Leicester, situated in the East Midlands of England. It is one of the oldest cities in England.

F. SHORT PLOT SUMMARY:

13 year old Adrian starts his diary on January 1st in the early 80’s. He writes an entry every day for nearly two years. He reflects on his school, his unrequited love (Pandora Baithwaite), and his parents (including his hilariously awful feminist mother). Adrian decides that he is an «undiscovered intellectual» and tries desperately to improve his brain by reading as many books as he can. He usually misses the point in all the books he reads but is confident about his wrong assertions. Here lies the some of the humor – we see the world through Adrian’s eyes and we can understand what is really going on between his mother and Mr «Creep» Lucus. But Adrian doesn’t quite understand it all yet. You feel so sorry for Adrian when his parents argue or when he is bullied, but the next laugh is always just round the corner.

Main conflict?

This book is very effective at communicating the confusion that adolescence can often be. It is also hugely touching.

Turning point – Adrian’s thought of having a better life and the thought that he deserves better life than the life he lives now. He realised that it was high time for his father to find a job, to be well paid and to increase Adrian’s pocket money.

Resolutions / Outcomes?

First of all Adrian promised to help the poor, so collected some old comics and brought them to a boy who lived nearby. Then he promised not to squeeze his spots, but he didn’t really keep his promise. He didn’t fulfill his resolution about drinking alcohol, because he drank whisky while he was staying at Nigel’s house. Adrian said that he wouldn’t try smoking and this is one of the resolutions that he stuck to.

G. CHARACTERS: ( complete descriptions of the main characters in the book, including appearance, personality, relationships which help define the character, as well as the character’s progress and/or transformation through the course of the book)

1. Adrian Mole is a teenage boy who is 13 ¾ years old at the beginning of the book. Being a teenage boy, he isn’t very sociable and talkative as girls at that age. Since he doesn’t speak about his problems, he decides to keep a diary, where he will write everything that happens to him. He starts his diary with a several new resolutions for the New Year because he wants to be a new and a good person. His life situation is very bad because his parents don’t pay attention on him and because they’re always arguing. He thinks that he has spots on his face and that one particular spot is growing very big, because his mother doesn’t know anything about vitamins, and his diet is very poor. I think that he should have more attention from his parents, especially from his mother. We always understand and feel for Adrian’s emotional problems and the physical changes he goes through. Adrian is like any other teenager – he has spots and he reads pornography. Adrian use to be alone and he has to be more sociable, he should have someone that really loves him and takes care of him too. The relationship between Adrian’s parents is really bad. They’re arguing all the time. At school, a new girl called Pandora has arrived and he thinks that he has fallen in love with her. She sits next to him in Geography classes and he soon realizes he has feelings for her. They have a love relationship, but Pandora thought it was very serious so they decided to slow down a bit. However the most embarrassing of all situations for Adrian was when he was building his model aeroplane. He decided to try an experimental sniff of the glue, he smelled the glue and his nose stuck to the plane. Adrian’s father took Adrian to hospital and everyone laughed at him. No matter what happened to him, he remained a decent and kind person.

2. Character 2

Pandora is Adrian Mole’s beautiful, treacle-haired first girlfriend and lifelong obsession. Pandora is the girl Adrian fells in love with. She sits next to Adrian in Geography classes and she likes being called Box. «Box» has got long hair the color of the treacle and she has a good figure. She lives on Elm Tree Street and has a horse that she likes to ride. Pandora thinks that Adrian’s father is a racist because when an Indian family moved into the Lucas’ old house his father said it was `the beginning of the end of their street’. She didn’t buy a present to Adrian for his birthday. She said she had given all her money to a poor man. She smokes five cigarettes a day, but Adrian doesn’t really mind that because he’s in love with her. When Adrian asks her to make love to him she said refused him saying that she didn’t want to be a single parent to her children, so they stopped seeing each other for a while.

3. Character 3

Bert Baxter is an old person Adrian cares for. He smokes, drinks and has a big dog called Sabre. Adrian thinks that he isn’t a nice old man, because of his constant complaints about everything. He’s a filthy 89-year-old communist who has sworn not to die until capitalism is destroyed; eventually becoming the oldest man in Leicester. Lives on beetroot sandwiches, Vesta curry and brown ale, and speaks fluent Hindi. Once, Bert Baxter phoned Adrian’s school because he had lost his artificial teeth which have a sentimental value from him as they were given to him by his father. Adrian becomes his toe-nail cutter, bottle washer and friend. Bert has a new girlfriend called Queenie and they have got married. They are moving into a new house and their honeymoon will be in the old people’s home.

4. Character 4

Nigel is Adrian’s life-long best friend, a cynical observer of his suffering over the years. Nigel’s big house and big room as well as the things he possesses are a constant reminder to the young Adrian of his relative poverty and parental neglect. After spending a weekend at Nigel’s house, Adrian thought that this particular weekend with Nigel had opened his eyes: he had lived in poverty for 14 years; he lived in a horrible house, ate terrible food and didn’t get enough pocket money. He thought his father would have to look for a better job. Nigel has got a new bike with a lot of gadgets and at one point Adrian said that if he had to choose between Pandora and Nigel’s bike, he would definitely choose Nigel’s bike. Adrian told him about his love for Pandora, but he only took an advantage of that fact. Nigel first became Pandora’s boyfriend and ruined the friendly relationship between himself and Adrian.

5. Character 5

George Mole is Adrian’s father. His many episodes of hospitalization, arguments, depression and unemployment have taken their toll. Adrian’s father and mother are separating because Adrian’s mother was cheating his husband with Mr. Lucas. Once, when Adrian’s father went fishing, Mr Lucas went to Adrian’s house for dinner. He ate three pieces of his father’s favorite cake. Then, when his father arrived home and came in the front door, Mr Lucas went out the back door. There was no cake left for Adrian’s father, and his mother gave him a cheese sandwich for his supper. His father threw it at the wall and said he wasn’t a mouse, he was a man. After this big raw, when Adrian’s father knew that Adrian’s mother was going to Sheffield with Mr. Lucas, Adrian’s father got angry and then, he fought with Mr. Lucas in the front garden. Despite their many tribulations he still loves Pauline Mole. He’s more than happy when he finds out that she is coming back to him.

H. ASSOCIATIONS: ( Ideas, situations, or characters that remind you of other texts you have read )

1. Connection: «Brigit Jones’s Diary» by Helen Fielding to «The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole»

Commentary: Brigit Jones is a 30 and something years old single women who I find similar to Adrian Mole because she also has a diary and she has her own resolutions (as well as Adrian ). Her resolutions are: to lose 7 pounds, to stop smoking and to develop Inner Poise.

Commentary: The other thing why I find these two books and characters similar is the way both Brigit and Adrian write about things – in a funny way, full of self-improvement thoughts and self-awareness. Also the fact that just like every teenage boy can find himself in the head of Adrian, in the same way every woman can find herself dealing with the same problems that Brigit deals with.

2. Connection: «Diary of a Wimpy Kid» by Jeff Kinney to «The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole»

Commentary: Greg Heffler is a middle-school boy that deals with almost the same problems as Adrian Mole. They both write about the advantages and disadvantages of growing up.

Commentary: Both books have humor in them and both are very easy to read and are meant for the same type of readers – mainly teenagers who find themselves in the same situations like the main characters in both of the books.

I. CRITICAL REVIEW OF THE BOOK:

The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13¾ is the first book in the Adrian Mole series of comedic fiction, written by Sue Townsend. I liked this book a lot. It has a strong sense of humor which is my favorite category of book, it also was written in a diary style which I really enjoy. It used simple grammar so it was really easy to read and follow. It was like you were in the head of an adolescent boy. It’s a very lighthearted story told through the diary entries of a British boy who considers himself a misunderstood intellectual. The sad topics (parent separation, unemployment, old age, etc.) are filtered though the eyes of a narrator who isn’t always aware of what’s really going on.

I would recommend this book to anyone. The diary format makes it very easy to read, but there is also a great deal of depth and thought to the book. There are so many memorable and funny characters in this book. There are also so many great moments. The book is sensitive but also deeply funny. When you finish this book you’ll want to read the other volumes of Adrian’s Diary.

Camisetas de fútbol , NBA y NFL baratas de la mejor calidad y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños. by Dobrica Nastova

Creditable or Calamitous? Reflections of a Derby Fan on a Season That Promised Promotion

As this 2014-15 Championship season races toward its conclusion, it’s hard to determine whether it represents success or failure for Derby County Football Club. Perhaps any individual assessment depends on one’s glass being generally half-full, or half-empty. As a Rams fan exiled in the Middle East, but able to see many of their games live or recorded in full afterwards, I haven’t made up my own mind on the matter just yet. This article is intended as a means toward that end.

Last season ended in play-off heartbreak. Derby were, of the play-off quartet, comfortably the form side going into the end-of-season event, and swept aside sixth-placed Brighton 6-2 over two legs. In the other semi-final, a dangerous Wigan side, who had earlier defeated eventual Premier League champions Manchester City in an astonishing FA Cup result, were edged out 2-1 by QPR, whose own form had been anything but convincing during the second half of the season. Derby controlled the Wembley final, and seemed almost certain to win when Rangers were reduced to ten men for a professional foul early in the second half; however, not for the first play-off final in their history, the Rams were defeated by a late winner, the product of two substandard pieces of defending and a wonderful finish by Bobby Zamora.

Such was Derby’s style and momentum, so impressive their individual performances – midfield starlet Will Hughes and prolific target man Chris Martin the most prominent among them – that the bookmakers installed the Rams as pre-season favourites this time around. Prospects were boosted still further when George Thorne, composed loan signing and Wembley man of the match, was signed permanently during the summer. Within days, however, Thorne – already no stranger to injuries in his short career – was ruled out for most of the season after damaging his knee in a friendly against Zenit St Petersburg. Appearing not to trust a whole season’s work to his natural replacement, the experienced John Eustace, Steve McClaren was delighted when the club’s player recruitment team snapped up Omar Mascarell, a stylish holding midfielder on the periphery of Real Madrid’s squad. It appeared to be a real coup, although all parties recognised that the Spaniard would need time to adapt to the greater speed and physicality of the Championship.

The season began with a 1-0 win over newly promoted Rotherham United, courtesy of a fine late strike from Irish midfielder Jeff Hendrick; a victory earned, in no small part, by the exciting contribution of new full-back Cyrus Christie, acquired from Coventry City to replace the solid, but now departed Liverpool loanee, Andre Wisdom. Christie’s defending was at least adequate (if not as impregnable as his predecessor), but it was the newcomer’s marauding runs that led many fans to feel hopeful that, far from the position being weakened, Derby might attain to greater attacking impetus from defence this season.

Of more concern, with Eustace out of favour, was the decision to play Hughes in the team’s apparently non-negotiable holding midfield role. While the player was undoubtedly good enough to play there, it was clear that neither of the more advanced players – Bryson, who many had expected to begin the season playing his football for a Premier League team, and Hendrick – could do exactly what Hughes was capable of further up the field. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the slight Hughes was not as comfortable with the physical side of the position as either the stocky Thorne or the guileful Eustace, and found himself almost sharing the position with substitute Mascarell from very early in the season. The Spaniard’s passing and energy did much to compensate for the evident weaknesses that many had predicted in his game: opponents gave him little time on the ball, and he quickly found himself on the receiving end of some rather combative challenges.

There were warning signs for Derby in a spirited but disjointed second league match at Sheffield Wednesday, which ended goalless. A first defeat followed in the next match, as stylish Charlton outplayed their more fancied guests, winning 3-2 and leaving many to wonder when the Rams would hit the performance levels of the previous season. They were encouraged by a merciless second-half display against Fulham, as Derby pummelled the plummeting Cottagers 5-1. Welcome to the Championship.

The Rams then embarked on an unbeaten run that spanned twelve games, including wins against expansive Bournemouth (2-0), Blackburn (3-2), Bolton (2-0) and Reading (3-0) (the latter three away from home); and resilient draws against early leaders and local rivals Nottingham Forest (1-1), and Cardiff (2-2) at home, a match in which the Rams had trailed by two goals. Derby’s comeback that day was begun by a debut goal from a new season-long loan signing from Liverpool: the fleet-footed and direct Jordon Ibe, whose contribution, with hindsight, seems as significant in Derby’s fortunes as was his premature return to Anfield in January.

That unbeaten run was curtailed by dogged Wigan, who belied their poor early season form by coming from behind to win 2-1 at the iPro Stadium. Derby then played two games in West London, hitting Fulham for five again (this time in the League Cup) before once again throwing away a lead against Brentford who, it seems, have never looked back since their last-minute win that day, courtesy of a fine goal from Stuart Dallas.

Derby needed to find their form – and find it they did, deservedly seeing off Huddersfield 3-2, before arguably their finest performance of the season in the annihilation of Wolves, 5-0 at the iPro. In the next match, Craig Bryson, who had so far struggled to reproduce his high standards of the two preceding seasons, scored a beauty to edge out Watford on their own turf. Suddenly Derby looked ready to seize their opportunity and run away with the league, just as their East Midlands rivals from Leicester had done the previous year.

It wasn’t to be so straightforward, unfortunately. The Rams went into their away match at Leeds, a team Derby had beaten for fun in recent seasons, seemingly unprepared for the grit and graft that would be needed to return with the points. They were outfought, and defeated, 0-2. But Steve McClaren prided himself on a team that could bounce back from disappointment, and Derby erupted out of the blocks against Brighton, winning the game with three first-half goals. In the opposing eleven that day was loanee Darren Bent, a wily, seasoned striker unable to convince then manager Paul Lambert of his right to a place in the Aston Villa side. Derby fans would be glad to see more of the discarded Bent very soon.

The following week, Derby were conquered at the summit by Middlesbrough, after a dour display in the North East demonstrated the worst they were capable of; Boro were organised and clinical, and undid Derby in their first attack, with former Rams loanee Patrick Bamford celebrating his opener gleefully – much to the annoyance of Derby fans, who had always had to overlook his affinity for their hated rivals, Forest. The Rams showed more fight and no little skill against a tidy and pressurising Norwich City side a week later, but were fairly denied a win when they conceded another late goal. The pattern of the previous season, in which Derby had become famed for their indefatigable spirit and late goalscoring, seemed to be shifting in the other direction.

The Rams began the festive period with a thumping win, 4-0 in the Birmingham snow. That was backed up with a revenge reversal of their 2-0 defeat at Leeds, and an excellent 1-0 win at Ipswich. John Eustace, hardly a fixture in the team, was immense in front of the back four, but his late dismissal and injury – from which he has yet to return despite two operations – would lead the Rams into the East Midlands derby once again relying on the unconvincing Mascarell. Even Forest fans approached the match fearfully. Their side had lost the previous season’s fixture 5-0, and the early season pacesetters now found themselves on a run of eight games without a win. Derby, fortuitously ahead but easily the better team before the break, gave a sickening validation of the phrase «game of two halves», and Forest exulted in a deserved shock win that would prolong the tenure of manager Stuart Pearce for a few more weeks. (This represented a bright side for many Rams fans, who were convinced their rivals’ progress would remain stagnant with the former England legend at the helm). Stunned at forfeiting local bragging rights, Derby fans demanded better, and were rewarded with three straight wins against Blackburn, Cardiff and Bolton.

The January transfer window had brought Bent in without a recall clause for his parent club, as well as Manchester United’s Jesse Lingard, and Hull City’s Tom Ince, who made an instant impact with a fabulous brace in the 4-1 destruction of Bolton. Leeds United captain Stephen Warnock, still not fit after being injured in the Rams’ 2-0 win over his side, came in to «add experience» to the squad, and presumably to spur the unspectacular Craig Forsyth to higher performance levels. An interesting further addition was the Spaniard Raul Albentosa, who Derby’s recruitment team appeared to have been stalking for some time, and who arrived in Derby having bought out his own contract with La Liga team Eibar, for whom he had offered some impressive performances throughout the season. Unfortunately, a niggling injury would delay Albentosa’s league debut for over a month.

Ince found the net again in an encouraging 2-2 midweek draw at top-of-the-table Bournemouth, where the most significant moment of the match would prove the early replacement of nineteen-goal Chris Martin. He would not return for eleven games; suddenly Bent’s loan signing seemed very important indeed, although a slightly different system of attack was needed to accommodate the latter’s style. The Rams approached the following midweek match at struggling Rotherham knowing that a win would take them back to the summit. Yet, once again, they failed to take their chance, with only a spirited fightback earning them a 3-3 draw, having trailed 1-3. Inspired by the return of George Thorne after seven months on the sidelines, Derby then won back-to-back home games against Sheffield Wednesday and Charlton, and found themselves on top of the league for the third time this season. Despite having repeatedly failed to press home the advantages they had gained, the bookies still made McClaren’s dangerous Derby side favourites for the title. They were to be proved emphatically wrong.

What followed resembles the stuff of nightmares for Derby fans. It began with a lacklustre defeat at Fulham, in which now pivotal loan signing Bent limped off, forcing the industrious and vastly improved Johnny Russell to assume a central striking role that he would retain for the next four games, without once finding the net. In addition, Thorne was again out of action, replaced in West London by the still-misfiring Mascarell. Typically, after the Fulham defeat, McClaren demanded a response. He got one, but not a result; the Rams battered Brighton but somehow contrived to lose the match 0-2. The focus intensified on Derby’s defence, arguably culpable for both goals. A performance and a win were needed when Birmingham came to the iPro, and the Rams picked them off easily, strolling toward a 2-0 victory as the match entered the third of four added second-half minutes. A few hearts were aflutter when the unspectacular Blues won, and converted, a penalty; Rams fans redoubled their whistling for full-time, the match length having already surpassed the additional time indicated. Nevertheless, a team with pretensions of winning promotion would surely be able to see the game out. Birmingham equalised in the seventh minute of injury time. The day ended with four teams on 66 points, separated by goal difference. Derby were still «in the mix», but nobody was quite sure how they were going to stay there on current form. And the games were only getting harder.

Derby went to resurgent Norwich the following Saturday with assistant Paul Simpson vowing that it was time to «win ugly» if necessary. Realistically, most Derby fans would have taken a draw, and when debutant Jamie Hanson’s corner was spilled into his own net by England goalkeeper John Ruddy, that’s exactly what they got. Hanson retained his place for the crucial midweek home match against Middlesbrough. Derby were toothless, loanee Lingard missing the best chance to fall to a white shirt. Once again, Boro were resolute; once again, it was Patrick Bamford, object of fear and loathing in Derby, who settled the match with an excellent finish. Derby were rocking.

The final game before the latest international break would take them to Wolves, hapless victims of the Rams’ finest moment of the season to date. McClaren and Simpson warned that the returns of Thorne and Martin may not be risked before the international break, but Bent was back to take his place at the centre of a truly astonishing refereeing controversy. Through on goal, the returning striker was fouled by Wolves captain and last man Danny Batth. Ince swept the ball into the net. The referee, who had already whistled for the foul, disallowed the goal and awarded a free-kick just outside the area. Rams fans watched in horror as the official, smiling sickeningly, refused to find any card in his pocket for the offender, much less the red one he clearly deserved. In some sort of grotesque tribute to John Ruddy, the normally reliable Lee Grant punched the ball into his own net to help Wolves wrap up a 2-0 win and move to within two points of Derby, who were slipping further from automatic promotion with every match. Fans picked the team apart, looking for an XI who could win the next match at home to high-flying Watford, thereby dragging the Rams’ promotion wagon back on track. Full-backs came under fire most of all, and here it was difficult to make a case for the defence. Left-back Forsyth, far superior defensively than in attack (perhaps surprisingly for a former midfielder), had compounded the injustice at Wolves by facilitating their first goal, inexplicably passing the ball to an opponent in a dangerous position. It was by no means the first time the Scotsman’s distribution had been found wanting during the season.

On the other side, Cyrus Christie was a nerve-shredded shadow of his early-season self. His first-half gift to Watford’s Vydra was cancelled out on the stroke of half-time by a Bent penalty, as the Rams’ opponents were reduced to ten men. Christie would not re-emerge after the break. Sadly, nor would George Thorne, attempting his second comeback of the season but lasting little more than twenty minutes. Once again, Derby contrived to throw away a winning position; Watford celebrated their 2-2 draw with delight, strengthening their own push for automatic promotion, while Derby retained their play-off place only on goal difference. The solitary silver lining seemed now to be the brief substitute appearance of Chris Martin, to whose absence so many had attributed the Rams’ slump.

On Easter Monday, with over four thousand Rams fans roaring them on, Derby finally picked up their first win in eight matches, as the talismanic Martin came off the bench to sweep them ahead at lowly Wigan. A typically opportunistic strike from Bent wrapped up the victory, leaving the Rams fascinatingly poised before the following weekend’s home match with Brentford. On paper, it seems the most difficult of the Rams’ remaining five fixtures, of which three are to be played at the iPro. However, with second-placed Norwich already five points ahead, and Watford and Middlesbrough much better placed to take advantage of any slip by the Canaries or leaders Bournemouth, only the most optimistic of Derby fans could reasonably expect automatic promotion at this stage. On the contrary, with Wolves in the best form of the current play-off place occupants, and Brentford able to overhaul the Rams with a win in their head-to-head, Derby still face a fierce battle to ensure their own place in the end-of-season competition that has already caused them so much heartache.

How has it come to this? And does the season represent a success or a failure for the Rams?

On reflection, it is important to consider the weight of expectation that has hung over the team all season. It is true that Derby were formidable during the latter part of the 2013-14 season, playing some scintillating football, and with an embarrassment of (injury-free) riches among their playing personnel. Yet arguably only Hughes and Russell have improved on their performances of the previous season; the immaculate Thorne has managed only three starts; Martin’s contribution has been blunted by the disastrous timing and duration of his injury; and the likes of Hendrick and Bryson have failed by some distance to match their performance levels of the previous season. Some loan signings have contributed much – particularly Ibe – while others have offered mixed fortunes: the injury-hit but prolific Bent; the frequently fantastic but oft-frustrating Ince, whose ball retention has been disappointing but who has scored some wonderful goals; and Mascarell, possessing all the vision and passing prowess one would expect of a Madrid graduate, but without ever providing a satisfactory solution for the role he was brought in to play.

Most attention has centred around the defence. In stark contrast to last season, during which the names of Andre Wisdom, Richard Keogh, Jake Buxton and Craig Forsyth seldom left the team sheet, McClaren has constantly tinkered with his defensive personnel this time around. Some fans have shown little patience with captain Keogh – possibly something of a hangover from his Wembley shocker – but in reality, the full-backs have proved a weaker link for most of the season. Christie, especially, seems particularly low on confidence, while the more self-assured Forsyth perhaps remains optimistic that his own form is solid enough and will improve still further; however, those who have endured his substandard performances throughout the season will likely have been glad of Warnock’s competent league debut at left-back in the victory at Wigan.

Another bone of contention relates to formation. While Derby have been more than a little unfortunate to experience long-term injuries to three holding midfield players (Thorne, Eustace and Mascarell), the lack of alternative playing styles and formations have also been mooted by fans as sources of frustration and failure to overturn teams that have set up defensively against the Rams and gained their rewards by doing so. The recent switch, through necessity, to a 4-2-3-1 has only added weight to this argument, not least because the defensive contribution of Mascarell has been questionable all season, and has almost certainly exacerbated any problems among the defence personnel. The use of Chris Martin behind Darren Bent has been used only fleetingly (albeit injuries have undoubtedly reduced the scope for this), while there is also a strong case for positioning the incisive passing of Hughes behind the front man, a move that has not been tried at all. This is not to suggest that the fans know better than McClaren; yet fans are certainly in a position to recognise what has not been working for long periods of the season. Managers, like players, can be «lucky» – not just in what they and their teams do, but in how they are perceived. Most things McClaren touched last season turned to gold. Such has been the man’s redemption since his ignominious England denouement, perhaps supporters had become over-confident in his ability. His true managerial performance, perhaps, lies somewhere between those two extremes of appraisal.

The mantra from the club, and the local press, remains that a Derby side returning to their best form are capable of ensnaring a promotion place this season. Some will fear that the likes of Will Hughes will be heading to the Premier League very soon, irrespective of how the Rams fare from now until the end of May.

It is never an easy ride being a Derby fan; one cannot sit back and get comfortable.

Derby have never been about coasting, but the rollercoaster.

Las Camisetas de fútbol de adidas se encuentran entre las preferidas de muchos equipos. Descubre por qué visitando nuestra colección en la web. by James Orme

How I Make Money by Gambling Smartly

There may be no such concept as a "sure thing" when it comes to gambling but there are a few bets which com pretty close.

Before I explain what I mean above, I want to make sure you are aware of two things. Firstly, be aware that the vast majority of people who set foot in a betting shop do not really want to win money. Yes, they'd like to win money but they don't really, really want it. If they desired to win money with all their heart they wouldn't be in a betting shop to start with, they'd be at home gaming online. Instead of mucking about with Lucky 15s and Yankees they'd be minimising their risk as much as possible.

Secondly, people in the UK don't really understand odds. We look at the lottery and feel fine about flushing pounds down the toilet in the vain hope of hitting the jackpot but would never consider risking £ 100 to win £ 1 on Manchester United winning when they are already two-nil up against Sunderland at home in the Premiership – and it's in the 85th minute!

In the second situation here I hint towards the secret of my success in the world of gambling. Like the stock market, the first rule of gambling is "never lose". This means betting in-running on an almost certain situation. This is certainly not for everyone and takes a complete mindshift. Take Saturday 27th September 2008. I backed 5 goals or less between Manchester United and Bolton when it was nil-nil well into the second half, and the same for Chelsea against Stoke. There was really no point when my money was in danger whatsoever. I made a 3% return on my money and it was only on risk for all of about about 25 minutes. It would only take about 20 sessions such as this for me to double my money. In fact I've managed to take a £ 10 starting bank to over £ 1000 on three occasions now.

To conclude, if you want to make money through gambling it is necessary to pack in the seven horse accumulators and start thinking smartly.

Las Camisetas de fútbol de adidas se encuentran entre las preferidas de muchos equipos. Descubre por qué visitando nuestra colección en la web. by Ross Taylor

United’s Player Antonio Valencia’s Injury History

In recent times, a great number of injuries have been taking place to football players, while the cause is being investigated, with most evidence hinting at the boots that they wear. They are attempting to figure out the blades are responsible for the injuries, or the regular studs used.

There was another injury that took place to Manchester United’s player Antonio Valencia, while he ended up trapping his foot in attempt to tackle the ball. The tackle in itself was not that severe however it resulted in his leg being snapped badly.

A lot of arguments go against the turf as it is more firm and stronger than it is actually meant to be. Not only this, but also a combination of studs and turf both could be the main problem.

A preference of most players is wearing boots that have bladed studs, as it provides better acceleration while playing the game. While on a firmer ground, they tend to choose the traditional designs of circular stud.

No player is forced to wear a specific brand, nor advised about its advantages or disadvantages. Apart from wearing that brand which sponsors them, they have the liberty to choose anything according to their will.

A type of custom made shoes that go around among most players is a combination of studs and blades both. However if there are too many variations, that could lead to more problems.

Nike seems to be the only considerate brand around as it has a new range with designs such boots which have the greatest amount of stability and resistance being offered.

Nowadays, every single manufacturer makes it a point to have the lightest weighing shoes so that lesser injuries start taking place and the performance of the players can also be improved.

comprar camisetas futbol spain y selecciones nacionales y todos los clubs para hombre,mujer y niños,Camisetas de fútbol en camisetasfutboles.es. by Megan Lambert