Kensington and Chelsea on a Budget

Those not that familiar with London are still aware that Kensington and Chelsea are two of the more expensive and glamorous areas of the big city. So, when you are looking for something different and you’re on a fairly tight budget, where do you start?

Of course when staying in the West End, visiting one of the many museums are excellent options for an enjoyable day out. The Science Museum, Natural History Museum and The Victoria and Albert Museum are all located here and you can visit them for free almost any day of the year.

Head a little further out of the city to Chelsea and you will come across the oldest botanical garden in London – the Chelsea Physic Garden. At only £9 for adults and £6 for students and children it offers a little tranquility away from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Golborne Road market, although connected to Portobello Road offers something a bit different, with a mix of stalls offering a variety of international foods and goods. The area is often referred to as Little Morocco due to the many Moroccan restaurants and shops, so there is definitely a bit of an international feel to the area. Markets are held here every day except Sunday.

Kensington Gardens and Palace are an excellent way to spend some time exploring. The Palace is now home to Wills, Kate and little Prince George so you’ll feel a sense of royalty wandering around, and perhaps you’ll even catch a glimpse of the Royal family. The area is beautiful, any time of year, go and soak up some horticulture!

Another area to enjoy the outdoors is Brompton Cemetery. It might sound a little odd to spend time in graveyard, but this is one of the finest and oldest Victorian graveyards in all of Britain. There are over 200,000 stones and it is considered to be one of the ‘Magnificent Seven’ cemeteries.

Lastly, the London Olympia Exhibition Centre is home to a variety of music shows, food fairs, business events and so much more. Every week there is something different to visit and a lot of the events are free or very cheap.

So, if you are looking for a bit of class on your London city break, but can’t quite afford to dine on the Kensington Roof Gardens, there is still plenty to see and do without burning a hole or three in your pocket.

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10 Good Reasons For Submitting Articles To Ezines

Writing compelling content and submitting articles to ezines and other article directories can be one of the most effective SEO tools in your arsenal. Help grow your Small Business and turbo charge your online marketing efforts today. Here are some advantages of creating and sharing great content:

1. Exposure

Simply put, your published article may appear on the ezine publishers homepage as recent and relevant content. This visibility may allow you to capitalize on their traffic.

2. Define your Expertise

You’re in business for yourself, and you are likely an expert in your industry. Sharing your knowledge with quality content can lend credibility to your Brand and may help position you within your competitive landscape.

3. Brand Recognition

Submitting articles to ezines will help Brand your website, yourself, and your business. With a well written «resource box» you can tell readers about your credentials, achievements, and expertise in your field.

4. Backlinks for SEO

Simply said, your article may have an indefinite shelf life on the ezine site itself. This can provide you with an invaluable backlink to your website, which we all know is a valuable SEO tool for increasing page ranking.

5. No Cost Advertising

Think of it this way… a published article is «free» advertising in a sense. Depending how successful your article becomes, this can help alleviate the contrained budgets small business owners often struggle with.

6. Revenue Generation

What if someone were to contact you to write content for their blog, or to hire you to consult for their business. That one article could actually lead to more revenue!

7. Viral Status

This is the holy grail of online marketing for small business! If you’re lucky enough to have your content and information shared by the masses, you’re doing something right! Keep in mind, this isn’t going to happen if the content you share is self promoting or lacks real life usable information. If you wouldn’t share it with your friends or co workers, the reader may not be likely too.

8. Reach for the Stars

«Reach» is a term that refers to how many individual consumers view your Brand message. Submitting your article to an ezine publisher that has a free content and/or an article directory on their web site can put your content in front of millions of users.

9. Credibility and Trust

Prospective clients and customers want to work with people, and support Brands they trust.

10. Relationships and Community

Putting yourself out there so to speak lets the online community know that you’re an active member. The quality of the content you produce may earn the respect of fellow authors and publishers. Especially when it comes to B2B marketing tactics, this is one of the most forgotten strategy.

Just remember that in the age of Social Media, «you are what you share.» When writing content and publishing articles, this is especially true. Be honest, genuine, and thoughtful, and you’ll gain the respect, exposure and Brand lift you seek.

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Staycation Guide: 5 Places In The UK That Will Make You Feel You Are Abroad

Staycations are again on the rise more, and more Brits are deciding to stay home for their holidays. But where in the UK should you go if you have never had a staycation before or fancy trying something new? Here is my staycation guide is here to help.

The UK is a dynamic place full of history, natural beauty, dramatic coastlines and historical cities. Every corner has such an individual identity that no two places are alike. Some UK destinations might even give you a little taste of Europe! Here is how:

Love The Algarve? Try Devon

Branded "the English Riviera", Devon is fantastic for families and beach holidays. It is also home to five areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, UNESCO Sites and Natural Parks.

For a cultural city break, try Plymouth or Exeter, both rich in Roman history. It it's the relaxed coastal life you want, try South Devon. For surfing, go for North Devon and Exmoor. And for the true Riviera experience, try Torquay, Paignton, and Brixham. There are also many smaller towns and villages worth exploring if you fancy going for a drive.

Love Tuscany? Try Lancashire, Yorkshire And Cumbria

North West England and the region of Tuscany in Italy share two things in common: beautiful green panoramic views and maxing food.

Famous for its artisan food, locally sourced produce and niche eateries, the counties of Lancashire, Yorkshire and Cumbria, will entice any foodie traveler with their food festivals and farm shops galore. To work up an appetite, you can visit the castles, museums, theaters or seafront towns or you can go hiking and take in scenery so beautiful that Queen Elizabeth is reported to have said she would like to retire here.

For more active travelers, highlights are the Yorkshire Dales, the Pennines and the Lake District, where you can try all sorts of sports from golfing to sailing and paragliding. For those wanting a peaceful hideaway, try smaller market towns such as Kirby Lansdale, Hebden Bridge or Clitheroe. And if it's a sea you seek, try Whitby, Scarborough or Lytham St Annes.

Love Switzerland? Try Scotland

If you a partial to mountain ranges, lakes and a pair of skis, then Scotland is the perfect staycation for you. With beautiful scenery, imposing castles and interesting cities thrown in for good measure, both Switzerland and Scotland will give you jaw-dropping views. Switzerland has some of the most famous ski resorts in the world, Scotland has the best ski resorts in the UK. The Swiss have the alphorn and Schnapps; the Scots have the bagpipe and their world-famous Scotch whiskey. Hell, the Scottish accent might even make you feel you're abroad!

Jokes aside, Scotland is indeed a beautiful country, with intriguing and grand history, beautiful landscape and stunning natural reserves. Even Her Majesty has a residence here, Balmoral Castle. For a city break, both Glasgow and Edinburgh are famous for their nightlife and culture. And if you like to drive, we would highly recommend the drive from Glasgow to Dundee. The views are to die for.

Love Rome? Try York

The Italian city of Rome is one of the most famous destinations in Europe, known worldwide for its rich history and vibrant culture. In the UK we have our little version thanks to the Romans themselves.

Although York existed as a settlement before the Roman invasion, it was during that period that it was declared a city of importance. Constantine the Great was proclaimed a Roman Emperor here. Even going out for a pint will yield a history lesson in pubs that used to be churches or monasteries. In recent years, York has become famous for its retail and nightlife as well as its history, and although it's much smaller than Rome, you will have plenty to do and see.

Love Berlin? Try Liverpool

Berlin and Liverpool share many commonalities. Both have witnessed their fair share of political and social change, but are today UNESCO Heritage Sites and European Capitals of Culture.

In the UK, Liverpool is the city with the most galleries and national museums outside of London. The birthplace of the Beatles, it also boasts a very strong art scene. On a more outrageous note, it has been said that the Liverpudlian velvet tracksuit is as infamous as the German beach thong! Liverpool is a vibrant and dynamic city, ideal for any art, fashion or music lover.

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Welcoming A New Family Of Stars Into Our Galaxy's Heart

The starlit galaxies of the observable Universe were born very long ago, and began to cast their brilliant, beautiful, starlit fires into Space less than a billion years after the Big Bang birth of the Universe almost 14 billion years ago. Our own large barred-spiral Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a very ancient structure that houses our Solar System, which is located about 27,000 light-years from the Galactic Center, on the inner edge of one of the spiral-shaped concentrations of gas and dust called the Orion Arm. The stars that dwell in the innermost 10,000 light-years of our Galaxy create a bulge and one or more bars that radiate out from the bulge –where there lies in wait, at the very heart of our Galaxy, an intense radio source, named Sagittarius A * , or Sgr A * (pronounced saj-a-star) , for short. Sgr A * is thought to be a supermassive black hole that weighs-in at millions of times the mass of our Sun. In November 2016, a team of astronomers announced the happy news that they have discovered a new family of stars living in our Milky Way's heart. This new family of stellar sparklers are a welcome addition to our neighborhood because they can shed new light on our Galaxy's birth in the primordial Universe.

This new discovery can solve some of the haunting mysteries surrounding globular clusters –which are spherical concentrations of about a million stars that formed at the very beginning of our Galaxy's existence. Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) researcher, Dr. Ricardo Schiavon, led the project responsible for discovering the tattle-tale family of stars. LJMU , in Liverpool, England, is a member of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) –an international collaboration of scientists at numerous institutions. One of the projects of this collaboration is the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) which gathers infrared data on literally hundreds of thousands of stars dwelling in our Milky Way Galaxy.

By observing stars in the infrared towards the Galactic Center , the team of astronomers were able to discover the new family of stars – the likes of which had previously been observed only within globular clusters.

Globular clusters are beautiful spherical collections of stars that orbit around the core of a galaxy, and are very tightly glued together by their own gravity – which is why they have spherical shapes and relatively high stellar densities towards their centers. These lovely collections of stars are usually found in the halo of a galaxy, and they harbor considerably more stars – and are also much older – than open clusters , which are considerably less dense than their globular cousins. Open clusters are also usually seen in a galaxy's disk , rather than in the halo.

There are approximately 150 to 158 globulars known to inhabit our Galaxy, and they are considered to be fairly common objects. In addition, there are perhaps about 10 to 20 more still undiscovered globular clusters within our Milky Way. These globulars orbit our Galaxy at radii of about 130,000 light-years– or more! Galaxies that are larger than our Milky Way can also play host to more globulars. For example, the slightly larger largest spiral, the Andromeda Galaxy , may host as many as 500 of these clusters. Some of the giant elliptical (football-shaped) galaxies – especially those that are located at the centers of galaxy clusters, such as M87 –can host as many as 13,000 globular clusters.

Our Galaxy is a denizen of the Local Group . Every galaxy of sufficient mass dwelling in the Local Group has an associated collection of globular clusters. The Sagittarius Dwarf galaxy, and the controversial Canis Dwarf galaxy, have both been observed to be in the midst of contributing their associated globulars –such as Palomar 12 –to the Milky Way. This sheds light on how many of our Galaxy's globulars might have been snatched up in the past.

Globulars contain some of the first stars to be born in a galaxy like our own. Nevertheless, how these clusters were born, and the role they once played in galactic evolution, are not well understood. Despite all this, it is generally thought that globular clusters formed in concert with the star-birthing process that occurred within their primordial parent galaxies – rather than as separate and distinct galaxies in their own right. Also, in many globular clusters , most of the constituent stars appear to be at the same stage of stellar evolution. This observation suggests that they were all born about the same time. However, the star-birth history varies from cluster to cluster, with some clusters showing distinct populations of stars.

Milky Way Matters

A sparkling host of brilliant stars hurl their fabulous light out into Space from where they dwell within the more than 100 billion galaxies of the observable Universe. The observable Universe is that relatively small portion of the unimaginably vast Cosmos that we are able to observe– most of the Universe exists far beyond what we can see. This is because the light streaming towards us from those mysterious and remote regions has not had enough time to reach us since the Big Bang. The starry galaxies of our observable Universe trace out for us enormous, and otherwise invisible, heavy filaments composed of transparent dark matter . The identity of the dark matter is not known, but many astronomers strongly suspect that it is composed of exotic, non-atomic particles that cannot interact with light, or any other form of electromagnetic radiation, which is why it is invisible. The starlit galaxies that mingle together to form groups and clusters of galaxies light up the transparent filaments that compose what is called the Cosmic Web. In this way, the stellar constituents of galaxies outline, with the bright light of publicity, that which we would otherwise not suspect is there.

The most widely accepted theory of galactic formation and evolution is frequently referred to as the bottom up model. The bottom up model proposes that large and majestic galaxies – like our own Milky Way – were rare in the early Universe, and that galaxies only gradually attained these impressive sizes as a result of collisions and mergers between much smaller, amorphous protogalactic blobs. It is generally thought that the most ancient galaxies were only about one-tenth the size of our own Galaxy, but as a result of their rapid production of fiery new and dazzling baby stars, they were just as brilliant. These relatively small, but extremely bright, very ancient galaxies served as the "seeds" from which the large galaxies inhabiting the Universe today grew and flourished.

In the primordial Universe, opaque clouds of mostly hydrogen gas bumped into one another and then coalesced along the massive, enormous filaments of the invisible Cosmic Web –composed of the ghostly dark matter. Even though scientists have not as yet identified what the dark matter really is, they have a good idea of ​​what it probably is not. Dark matter is most likely not made up of the "ordinary" atomic matter that composes all of the familiar elements listed in the Periodic Table– the so-called "ordinary" stuff of stars, planets, moons, oceans, sand, trees, and people. "Ordinary" atomic matter is really very extraordinary – even though it only accounts for about 5% of the mass-energy of the Universe. Atomic matter is what brought life into the Universe. We are such stuff as stars are made of. The stars created literally all of the atomic elements heavier than helium, that made life possible, in their nuclear-fusing hearts. In this way, the stars progressively created heavier and heaver atomic elements out of lighter ones. The iron in our blood, the calcium in our bones, the oxygen we breathe, and the carbon that is the basis for life on Earth – the dirt, stone, and sand beneath our feet – were all manufactured in the searing-hot nuclear-fusing furnaces of the stars or, alternatively, in the explosive supernova demise of the more massive stellar denizens of the Cosmos.

Our Galaxy's oldest stars have been estimated to be 13.6 billion years old. This would suggest that the Milky Way is almost as old as the Universe itself, which is about 13.8 billion years old. Stars and gases at a wide range of distances from the Galactic Center of our Milky Way all orbit at about 220 kilometers per second. This constant speed of rotation conflicts with the laws of Keplerian dynamics and hints that much of our Milky Way's mass does not emit or absorb electromagnetic radiation – an indication of the existence of dark matter.

In the primeval Universe, little by little, the wandering clouds of primordial gases and the invisible, ghostly dark matter did their fantastic dance together, combining to create the familiar structures in Space that astronomers observe today. Dense collections of the dark matter came to fill the entire ancient Cosmos, thus becoming the "seeds" from which the galaxies formed and evolved through Time. The powerful gravitational tugs of those ancient protogalactic "seeds" squeezed the primeval gases into ever tighter and tighter clouds. The clouds intermingled in a mysterious ancient dance, colliding and merging with one another to create these very ancient galactic building blocks. The primordial building blocks formed when halos of dark matter collapsed under the powerful and heavy weight of their own gravity. The protogalaxies did their ancient waltz together, eventually forming ever larger structures that became immense, majestic, starlit galaxies like our own Milky Way. The very ancient Universe was much smaller than it is today because of the accelerating expansion of Spacetime. The protogalaxies were relatively close to one another and, as a result, frequently bumped into one another and merged. This is how galaxies like our Milky Way were born.

From Earth the Milky Way can be seen as a fuzzy band of soft white light about 30 degrees wide, creating an amazing arc across the sky. The light emanating from this band originates from the accumulated light of unresolved stars and other material situated in the direction of the Galactic Plane . Darker segments of the band, such as two areas named the Great Rift and the Coalsack , are really regions where light from distant stars is blocked out by shrouds of obscuring dust swirling around in the space between stars. The area of ​​the sky blocked by our Milky Way is called the Zone of Avoidance. Our Galaxy is the second-largest inhabitant of the Local Group , after the spiral Andromeda Galaxy .

Our Milky Way plays host to between 200 and 400 billion stars, and at least 100 billion planets. By comparison, the Andromeda Galaxy is thought to harbor approximately one trillion stellar inhabitants. However, most of the mass of our Milky Way appears to be composed of the dark matter , which interacts with "ordinary" atomic matter only through the force of gravity. A dark matter halo is spread out relatively uniformly to a distance beyond one hundred kiloparsecs from the Galactic Center.

The disk of stars in our Galaxy does not display a sharp edge beyond which there are no stars. Instead, the concentration of stars decreases with distance from the center of our Milky Way. Surrounding the Galactic Disk is the spherical dark matter halo, containing stars and globular clusters, that extends outward. However, the halo is limited in size by the orbits of a duo of amorphous Milky Way satellite galaxies, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The Magellanic Clouds make their closest approach to the Galactic Center at approximately 180,000 light-years.

Welcoming A New Family Of Stars Into Our Galaxy's Heart

The lovely new family of bewitching stars possibly once belonged to globular clusters that were destroyed during the violent beginning of the formation of the Galactic Center. In this case, there would have once been approximately 10 times more globular clusters in our Milky Way, during its formative early years, than there are today. This means that a large percentage of the elderly stars, now dwelling within the inner portions of our Galaxy, may have been born in globular clusters that were eventually destroyed.

"This is a very exciting finding that helps us address fascinating questions such as what is the nature of the stars in the inner regions of the Milky Way, how globular clusters formed and what role they played in the formation of the early Milky Way– and by extension the formation of other galaxies. The center of the Milky Way is poorly understood, because it is blocked from view by intervening dust. Observing in the infrared, which is less absorbed by dust than visible light, APOGEE can see the center of the Galaxy better than other teams, "explained Dr. Ricardo Schiavon in the November 21, 2016 LJMU Press Release.

Dr. Schiavon continued to note: "From our observations we could determine the chemical compositions of thousands of stars, among which we spotted a significant number of stars that differed from the bulk of the stars in the inner regions of the Galaxy, due to their very high abundance of nitrogen.While not certain, we suspect that these stars resulted from globular cluster destruction. They could also be the byproducts of the first episodes of star formation taking place at the beginning of the Galaxy's history. We are conducting further observations to test these hypotheses. "

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Find Good Manchester Hotels Using Hotel Comparison Sites

Manchester is wonderful riverside town and till date it has preserved itself as historically and culturally. Merrimack River is exploited for abundant water power, which is used for operating Amoskeag mills. Since ancient times, manufacturing still plays a vital part in the Manchester’s economy. This city is buzzed up by the activities of low taxes and diverse work force. There are several Manchester hotels, which are well equipped in catering the huge population pouring in the city for different activities.

Each one of us is greatly concerned about the stay, as it is major part of the tour. Compare hotel rates after bit of research before you embark to Manchester to have stress free vacations. Also, it is best way to acquire desired hotel suiting your budget.

Below mentioned are affordable resorts in Manchester offering cutting edge facilities and thus can be considered for accommodation in the town.

The Britannia Manchester

One of the architecturally renowned hotels in Manchester; The Britannia Manchester is amazingly designed and located in the heart of city. The accommodation is located with in easy reach of business, recreational and cultural attractions. Moreover, visitors can mark their presence at the places ideal for leisure and business activities. There are 363 smoke free rooms and suites equipped with comfortable furnishings and modern amenities. Guests can walk down to relish in famous Chinatown and The Village, with their myriad of bars and restaurants. Stay at Britannia Manchester hotel is laced with all the comfort of the world.

Arora International Manchester

Arora International is located 0.4 km away fromManchester center. Accommodation in this four star hotel will be highly convenient, as you will be in easy reach of city’s attractions and famous venues. Shopping freaks can suffice their senses by visiting Manchester’s Arndale Center, Exchange Square or short drive to Old Trafford stadium. This Manchester hotel incorporates 141 bedrooms, which are integrated with contemporary styling and pleasant interiors. The stay in this resort will integrate you with high end services including cloud 9 beds, broadband access and mini fridges. The hotel highlights well known Obsidian Restaurant and Bar. You can explore Manchester nightlife by visiting 50 ft animated bar serving excellent cocktails.

Palace Hotel

The Palace Hotel is wonderfully constructed and listed as Grade II building. It is known as a landmark of Manchester. Guests can make their comfortable stay in 275 bedrooms, which integrated with several original and traditional features. You can keep your work on move with high speed internet access. Hotel’s magnificent teracotta building was completely renovated in 2008 to ensure that vast public area and illuminating Tempus bar should charm everyone with its contemporary style. The Palace Hotel is well known in North of England for offering grandest banqueting facilities. There are 19 fantastic meeting / function rooms to meet needs of the guests.

Accommodation is vital part for touring purposes and it covers major part of the budget. In order to save your hard earned money, it is suggested to make use of hotel price comparison websites to acquire best deals.

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The Majestic Manchester

In recent years, Manchester has reached the fame of being the third most visited city in England. Once Manchester was the main industrial hub, today the regal and attractive places makes this city as the most preferred holiday destination in UK. Manchester is well known for number of majestic museums that offers visual treat to the travellers. The spacious and stylish restaurants serve cuisines from all over the world to stir up your taste buds and the many hotels in the city suit the needs of all kinds of travellers.

Know more about the places in Manchester city:

Manchester Museum You can easily reach this museum as it is located near Manchester’s student village. This museum consists of rare collections and treasures of animal, and plant lives and rocks and minerals. The best pieces include pre-historic creatures, rare collection of Egyptian and live reptile’s and amphibians. They also allow you to access the objects displayed in collections. The cafeteria in this museum is a nice place to relax and discuss about your views and ideas with respect to culture and artefacts.

Royal Exchange Theatre: Royal Exchange theatre is situated in St Ann’s square. This is one of the best theatres and it hosts 350 shows in a year and accommodates around 7000 people who can be seated in three levels. Audience would be thrilled to experience a mixed performances that include drama, classic theatre, rock, folk and jazz concerts. The craft shop inside the Royal Exchange Theatre helps you pick outstanding pieces of jewellery for your loved ones. Besides this, you have plenty to choose from the collections that have textiles, ceramics, wood work and much more.

The Lowry: You can reach the recently developed Lowry just by a short drive from the city centre of Manchester. Lowry had gained great attractions in a short time and is considered one of the best places to visit. The mixed performances are scintillating that include dance, musicals, kid’s shows, comedy and full range drama. They have two theatres and studio space to present these shows. Southern side of the Lowry building is dedicated for dining and refreshment, so it consists of cafes, bars and restaurants.

Imperial War Museum North: This museum was opened in 2002 and it mainly deals with war ships. The well known architect Daniel Libeskind has designed these ships. Among the numerous collections, five pieces are significant as they date back to world wars.

John Rylands Library: John Ryland was a most successful industrialist in Manchester. He died in 1888 leaving all his fortune to his wife; then his wife maintained the library in his remembrance. The majestic building has a splendid gothic style. This place is a working library and consists of many unusual manuscripts which can be used in academia. However, visitors can still come to the place and view the extraordinary architecture.

Besides these, Manchester is a greener city in England and has a lot of outdoor activities especially the large public parks are centre of attraction. Some of the popular parks are Heaton Park, Wythenshawe Park, and Queens Park. Whether indoor or outdoor places, Manchester can entertain and make your trip a memorable one.

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