Using Zoning Laws to Protect Affordable Housing

After five years of negotiating with Mayor Mike Bloomberg's office, the New York City Council has approved extension of a zoning-law amendment aimed at protecting affordable housing units in several districts. Affected areas include the Garment District, West Chelsea and Hudson Yards – three areas that have seen a lot of new developments and increases in property prices.

The new zoning law prevents both landlords and developers from significantly changing more than twenty percent of existing units in multi-family buildings. Renovations and updates can be made, but can't significantly alter the unit's price.

Historically, when an apartment or townhome complex is renovated, the result is increased rental or purchase prices. The ability the charge higher prices is typically the motivating factor behind renovations and upgrades. While the city council doesn't want to interfere with a property owners right to make changes (or profits), it has also seen low-income people repeatedly forced to move out of renovated properties that they can no longer afford.

The Chelsea area, in particular, has become a popular place for new developments – both residential and commercial. City Council members were concerned that landlords – in an effort to capitalize on higher-end business – would renovate existing structures to the point that they would become unaffordable for current residents.

City Council members also hope the new zoning laws will preserve some of the older architecture in the affected districts. The new law extends an existing Special District amendment that was passed in 1974. It affects all multi-family buildings of three units or more that were built in 1974 or prior.

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Dubai Palm Island Property Investment

Dubai's reputation as a property hot spot has been secure for the last six years with the construction boom to match, fueled by an increase in tourism in the south of Asia and investment in overseas property in Dubai boasting some of the most ambitious projects including the famous Dubai Palm Island the self declared 'eighth wonder of the world.' Prospective owners of property on the Palm Island are buying a unique piece of history as well as a holiday home.

The Palm Islands (Palm Jumeirah, Palm Jebel Ali and Palm Deira) will add a total of 520 kilometers to the shoreline which nearly doubles this lucrative area for Dubai. The Palm Jumeirah alone boasts 30 beach front hotels due to open by the end of 2009. The available property will include three main types of property including canal cove town homes, signature villas and garden homes which will be complemented by a series of community bars, cafes, retail outlets, sports and spa facilities.

The finished development is set to dazzle and amaze prospective owners almost as much as the construction itself, and it will employ 40,000 workers, most of them from south Asia itself which has no doubt had a positive impact on the local population. The island was created using sand to build up the area before construction, a mega 95 million cubic meters of sand and 7 million tons of rock. Dubai's national import of cement increased by over 70% during 2007 to accommodate the construction of the world's largest cement canals as part of the Palm Island project.

A development of this size is not without it's environmental impact, the relocation of much wildlife in the artificial reef's off the Palm Jumeirah has maintained the local ecosystem as well as encouraging new marine life within the area giving property owners much of the original natural wildlife attractions of the Dubai coastline. Unfortunately the impact of the continuous barrier surrounding the Palm has disturbed the natural flow of tidal waves causing the water within the Palm to become stagnated measures have been taken to create movement and oxygenation within the Palm have been taken.

The Palm Island Project itself has run into many unforeseen situations such as the breakwater displacing the tidal flow, this is one of the things blamed for the ongoing setbacks in construction and seems to be around two years later than planned. Another main factor has been the increase in the number of properties on each of the Island. The original plans have doubled in the number of individual properties available, which has lead to fears that construction will be damaged by the increase in use especially at the entry and exit points. The decrease in individual property living space will undoubtedly have an effect on any resale value, of property on the Palm Island and investors who bought from the original plans have never been compensated for the increase in properties available but even with this set back any long term investment made on Palm Island will give a sound return due to its unique and extravagant location.

En la tienda online de Camisetas de fútbol tenemos todas las camisetas de tus equipos y selecciones favoritas en tallas para adulto y niño. by Chelsea Butterworth

Heartsick – Written by Chelsea Cain

Gretchen Lowell is a beautiful serial killer that cons her victims into doing things for her or with her, followed by their demise in a slow. deliberate way. Archie Sheridan is an experienced cop who unknowingly falls under Gretchen’s spell. Archie wakes up groggy with a body on the floor beside him in a place he did not recognize. How did he get here? Gretchen had placed her services as a psychiatrist to help Archie and the authorities find the many victims that were still missing. Gretchen «helped» Archie all right to the point of him being so drugged up that he could not think straight but he did recognize a beautiful woman that was controlling him and brutally attacking his body with various weapons including nails through his rib area.

Then when she got Archie to the edge of death, she changed her mind and decided to save him. She took him to the hospital and turned herself in to the authorities. She had a connection with Archie that she did not have with anyone else. Archie eventually recovers to the extent he could resume his detective duties but his body would always be wracked with pain thanks to Gretchen. While in prison, Gretchen would only talk to Archie during which time she would divulge the name or names of her victims and where they could be found. Archie was falling for Gretchen even though he was married and divorced from Debbie, who he still had feelings for, and he loved their children.

Susan Ward was a young, brash, and wild reporter for the Oregon Herald who wanted to go places fast but her young and wild appearance turned off many. But she did wrangle a chance to work with the task force that was working on finding Gretchen’s victims. Archie did not really want this young whippersnapper working with him but when Susan showed some smarts he gave in and allowed her to work with him and the task force, sometimes sorry he made that decision.

This leads to a terrific story that I found hard to put down. Chelsea Cain is an author I never heard of before but I am very aware of her great work now. I was very fortunate to read her follow-up book, «Sweetheart» that picked up intensity right where «heartsick» ended. You will not be sorry you purchased this book but you will not be able to close your eyes and go to sleep!

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Cy Hilterman

My Local Victim of the Titanic Disaster

Alfred Allsop was a victim of the Titanic disaster who was a native of my region. He was an electrical engineer, and as such he helped to keep the lights on for as long as possible while the passengers located the lifeboats, the consequence of which he went down with the ship and his body was never recovered. This is my small tribute to him.

Alfred Samuel Allsop was born in 1876, at 96 Brunswick Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. He was the youngest of four sons in a family of ten children to George Foster Allsop, a travelling salesman, and his wife, Elizabeth (formerly Walker), the daughter of an Irish teacher. They married in 1860 at Manchester Cathedral, where most of their children were christened. One of Alfred’s sisters had died before he was born. By 1891 the family had moved to 29 Broughton Lane, Lower Broughton, Salford, and Alfred was well known in the district. He became interested in the power of electricity at an early age, spending much of his time riding on the electric tram cars in Manchester and he was a regular visitor at the Salford power station in Bloom Street, which supplied the bulk of traction supply for central Manchester, plus lighting and power demand.

When he was fifteen he began an apprenticeship with H H Hall and Company of Liverpool, who was pioneering the use of ships telephones, followed by employment with Campbell and Isherwood of Bootle, where he worked in the development of electrical switchboards. This was followed by short spells at the Hame Electric Company and the Northern Electric Company, both of Liverpool. He left Manchester to take up an appointment on the Baltic, and joined the White Star Line in August 1904 as assistant electrician aboard the Celtic II. He later served on the Majestic and Oceanic, in which it is said he crossed the Atlantic about a hundred times before joining the Titanic.

He had an inventive mind, and it was he who developed an idea for a multi-clutched lifeboat winch powered by an electric motor, which would allow fully laden lifeboats to be lifted from a ship straight into the water. This invention became ‘The Allsop Electric Lifeboat Crane’, but he did not see his device go into production. When the White Star Line moved their headquarters to Southampton he moved to that town. He was one of the transfer crew which brought the Titanic to Southampton on 2 April, where he signed-on as second electrician.

The RMS Titanic was a British registered four-funnelled ocean liner built for the Trans-Atlantic passenger and mail service between Southampton and New York. Constructed at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, to have sailed on ‘The voyage of the century’ aboard the Titanic, the world’s largest and most luxurious vessel afloat at that time, was like being one of the first people to fly on Concorde. It was described at the time as ‘a floating palace’ – Mayfair and Bel Air on water! People from all walks of life began embarking on the Titanic at Southampton on 10 April 1912, for what was to be the trip of a lifetime on the ship’s maiden voyage across the north Atlantic; many were looking forward to starting new lives in the United States.

However, just before midnight on Sunday, 14 April 1912, it began to send out signals of distress stating: ‘We have struck an ice berg.’ The ship had been steaming at a speed other crews would have envied at that time, when it collided with an enormous iceberg which stripped off her bilge under the waterline for more than a hundred yards, opened up five of the front compartments and flooded the coal bunker servicing one of the boilers. She sank about three hours later. There were sixteen lifeboats and four collapsible dinghies, which were insufficient, as a consequence of which two out of every three of the 2,200 people on board perished.

Alfred was doing the last shift of the day from ten until one minute to twelve, so he was on duty in the generator room when the Titanic hit the iceberg. However, he remained at his post when all was lost, helping to keep the lights burning to aid the passengers to get to the lifeboats. It was estimated that the ship’s power would last no more than an hour, yet Alfred and his colleagues kept the power on for two hours and forty minutes, and the lights stayed on until a few minutes before the ship sank. Without their self-sacrifice power would have been lost and the death toll would have been considerably higher.

The CS Carpathia was in the region, and on receiving a distress signal it immediately set a course towards the disaster area. After working through dangerous ice fields it arrived at the scene at four o’clock in the morning of 15 April. Some people, mostly woman and children, had escaped from the ship in lifeboats and the Carpathia saved over seven hundred people. A Carpathia spokesman reported the scene as they arrived at the area where the Titanic went down: ‘The Sea was dotted with bodies as far as one could see, and the decks were covered with them. Everybody had on a lifebelt and bodies floated very high in the water in spite of the sodden clothes and things in pockets. Apparently the people had lots of time and discipline must have been splendid, for some had on their pyjamas, two and three shirts, two pairs of pants, two vests, two jackets and an overcoat. In some pockets a quantity of meat and biscuits were found, while in the pockets of most of the crew quite a lot of tobacco and matches besides keys to the various lockers and stateroom doors were found. On this day we buried fifteen bodies some of them very badly smashed and bruised.’

The Mackay-Bennett searched the disaster area a few days later and buried 116 bodies at sea, and the ship arrived back in Nova Scotia with 190 bodies on board. Some victims were buried in two separate mass graves, while others were claimed by their families and transported home.

Alfred’s body was never recovered, however, he is named on the Liverpool Titanic and Engineers memorial, and there is a brass memorial plaque at St Faith’s Church in Great Crosby, which is dedicated: ‘to the memory of the Chief Engineer and his Engine Room staff.’ He is named on the Southampton Engineers Memorial in East Park, on the Glasgow Institute of Marine Engineers memorial and on the Institute of Marine Engineers memorial in London.

He is believed to have married a woman named Hilda not long before he died, and they are said to have had a child named Philip Alfred. This comes from the fact that in 1914, a woman stating her name to be Hilda claimed from the Titanic Relief Fund and was granted one pound: ‘for expenses due to the illness of her little boy.’ However, there is no registration listing for any marriage for Alfred, and there is no birth registration for his son. No wife and son have ever been traced.

Tu tienda especializada de Camisetas de fútbol retro y vintage. Compra Camisetas de fútbol antiguas, replicas auténticas. Moda clásica. by James W Bancroft

Adult Dating On Merseyside

The Mersey divides the metropolitan county of Merseyside into two parts. On the west side is Wirral whilst all of the remaining boroughs are located on the east. These border Lancashire and Greater Manchester. Both sides of the division have a border with Cheshire to the south.

Whichever part of Merseyside they live in, inhabitants prefer being described as living ‘ON’ Merseyside as opposed to living ‘IN’ it. Altogether there are 1.4 million people live on Merseyside, giving it a population density of 5500 people per square mile.

This level of population density creates an excellent potential for adult dating but for some reason the county doesn’t quite match up to expectations when compared to similarly highly populated areas elsewhere. Nevertheless, any seriously determined single or couple who wants to enjoy adult dating or the swinging lifestyle on Merseyside should be able to do so with relative ease.

In addition to these basic demographic factors favouring ease of contact between adult fun seekers, the city of Liverpool itself and to a lesser extent, other boroughs in the county; offer much in the way of meeting and dating places.

No reference to Liverpool is complete without mention of the Beatles and the Cavern club. It stages an average of nearly forty live performances every week and anyone choosing this historic venue as a dating rendezvous will be treated to entertainment from bands performing original music.

Liverpool’s claim to adult party venues is sadly somewhat less inspiring. A rather seedy establishment in the north of the city no longer seems to function whilst the announcement in 2007 to open a three floor venue, consisting of six private rooms, sauna, licensed bar and relaxation lounge, seems to have been less welcomed by the local community than the owners believed would be the case.

A certain city night club with a particularly liberal attitude publicly welcomes a diverse range of adult interests and suggests itself as doubling up as a swingers meeting place. Again, this is a slightly exaggerated claim but the club still makes a great rendezvous for people to meet broadminded individuals.

Despite this rather disappointing selection of commercial venues, the city has plenty of private parties and meetings to offer. These are held in hotels, luxury self catering apartments and in private homes. The only other area of Merseyside to have a regular adult party venue is the Wirral. Here there is a swingers club that maintains a predominantly ‘couples’ feel by restricting the numbers of single males attending their weekend events.

The Wirral is also a great area for privately hosted events with many couples and singles hosting some excellent meetings and parties in what are often very luxurious residences.

In order to receive invitations to parties and meetings like these, the newcomer to adult dating will first need to establish themselves as a respected and well liked member of a club that has a really active membership representation in the area. There is an art to doing this and several articles are available on the subject. You should read these and follow the tips and advice given in them. Above all else however, determination, persistence and patience will be needed. Apply those and your adult dating on Merseyside will eventually become a very rewarding experience.

Camisetas de fútbol , NBA y NFL baratas de la mejor calidad y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños. by Wendy Peters

The History of Aintree Racecourse

Aintree Racecourse is one of the most famous racecourses in the world and is located on the A59 at Ormskirk Road, Aintree (Anglo-Saxon for 'one tree'), in the northern suburbs of Liverpool, just 6 miles from the city center.

The racecourse occupies more than 250 acres and has two left-handed chasing circuits. The rectangular Mildmay Course is the first and was opened in 1953. It is nearly one and a half miles in length, with sharp turns and steeplechase fences.

The Grand National course isn't as sharp as the Mildmay course but is much more demanding which is why it is known as one of the toughest races in the world, one which all horse trainers aspire to gain entry to. The Grand National course is far longer than the Mildmay, at almost two and a quarter miles, and is completely flat, with fences that have a drop on the landing side lower than the take-off side.

William Lynn is the man responsible for bringing racing to the village of Aintree. Lynn was the landlord of the Waterloo Hotel and started racing on the land which he leased from the Earl of Sefton. He started to build the grand stand in 1829 and after five months the first meeting for flat races was held.

Hurdle racing didn't begin until 1836, when the first Liverpool Grand Steeplechase was held at Aintree on February 29th. This race is considered by some as being the first ever Grand National and was won by The Duke, ridden by Captain Martin Becher.

However, the more documented Liverpool Grand Steeplechase of 1839 is more commonly identified as the first Grand National, and was won by Lottery, ridden by Jem Mason. The race of 1839 was a four miler, across country, and the rule was that 'no rider to open a gate or ride through a gateway, or more than 100 yards along any road, footpath or driftway'.

The racecourse was handed over to the War Office in 1915, and after the 1940 National it was again requisitioned by the military. Racing resumed in 1946 and in 1949 the racecourse was bought by Messrs Topham Ltd; who had leased the land for almost a century; from the Earl of Sefton for £ 275,000. Mirabel Topham, an enterprising soul, went on to create the Mildmay course and a motor-racing circuit which held the European Grand Prix and five British Grand Prix.

Bill Davies bought the racecourse in 1973 for £ 3 million and in 1975 Ladbrokes saved the Grand National, which was in danger of dying out, by managing and administering it for seven years at a yearly rent of £ 250,000. In 1983 the racecourse was deemed secure when the Jockey Club bought it.

Aintree has come a long way from the days when it could only be accessed by rail or paddle boat. Now, improved rail and network links means that fans can travel by any means to reach the wonderful racecourse. There is even a six acre enclosure for landing by helicopter on site or the alternative option of John Lennon airport twenty minutes drive away, meaning that those both home and abroad can come share in the magnificent Aintree festivities.

Echa un vistazo a nuestra variedad de Camisetas de fútbol. Camisetas de entreno y partido de clubes nacionales y selecciones internacionales. by Darren W Chow

Souness – an Accident Waiting to Happen

Being a Newcastle fan you learn to live more in hope than expectation, yet the one thing we do demand is to be entertained. Graeme Souness was on the verge of the sack from Blackburn Rovers in August 2004 and yet Newcastle United’s walking public relations disaster and part-time chairman, Freddie Shepherd, in his infinite wisdom decided to PAY the Lancashire club for the man’s services! £1.65m later and with several lucrative contracts sorted for Souey’s entourage of a clueless old timer, a few well wishers and his ‘yes’ man Dean Saunders, Newcastle United proudly presented Souness to the media. The new manager spoke in glowing terms about the club and how proud he was that his son would grow up with a Geordie accent. In reality he was probably just amazed that someone had once again been daft enough to employ him.

With one of Souness’ best friends being camp crimper Dale Winton, there is no doubt that the fiery Scot could have got a gig on Supermarket sweep or something equally as testing of his remarkable ‘talents’. That is if he didn’t get angry with Dale hogging the spotlight and as a result launch into a two footed tackle on a shopping trolley. The one time I asked Dale Winton for a favour he didn’t come through for me, damn.

There wasn’t the same fanfare from the Tyneside crowd that was usually afforded to a new manager as Souness made his first appearance at SJP. Keegan and Robson had been hailed as saviours, Dalglish was warmly received and everyone got the wigs out for Ruud Gullit. Not this time though, although the Mags hammered Souness’ previous club 3-0 (Souness was officially on ‘gardening leave’). Blackburn Rovers were a shambles that day and many onlookers questioned how badly they must have been managed to get into such a state. Our new leader just sat in the stands beaming a wide smile next to his son who wore a full Newcastle kit, perhaps hoping that it would speed up the transition of his boy’s soon to be Geordie accent. Fans knew even then what the chairman apparently didn’t until the last few weeks of the Souness tenure – this was an accident waiting to happen.

In my mind there is no doubt that Sir Bobby Robson had passed his sell by date long before he was kicked out of his job as gaffer. Not because he was a 71-year old man who forgot people’s names, he was doing that in his 50’s as England manager (Once calling Bryan Robson ‘Bobby’ to which his captain replied «No gaffer, you’re Bobby, I’m Bryan!»), but because he was making no sense in his tactical decisions and had given his all but looked worn out. With that in mind Robson should have been told that his time was up at the end of the 2003-2004 campaign and could have gracefully moved on. Instead he was sacked just four games into a season, the third consecutive Toon manager to be ousted after a handful of early season games.

Despite all of the concerns over the new man, Souness started well and the club went ten games undefeated under his guidance. A number of fans were ready to accept him and yet there remained an overall feeling of scepticism in the North Eastern air. Mark Hughes was installed at Blackburn and immediately commented on how unfit his players were and that he was appalled with the stories he had heard about the training sessions before he arrived. Most people took his remarks with a pinch of salt at the time, only later did they seem apt.

It was only a matter of time before somebody upset Souness and that man was the volatile Craig Bellamy, the club’s most in-form player and also the most outspoken. Bellamy boasted to players that he would feign injury and refuse to play as he felt he was being wasted on the wings rather than his preferred role up front, Souness reacted by leaving him out of the match at Highbury against Arsenal. Souey claims he was willing to forgive and forget until the player did an interview with Sky Sports saying that his manager: «Went behind my back, right in front of my face.» Of course this showed two things – 1. Craig Bellamy is about as intelligent as a monkey with Alzheimer’s disease and 2. Souness’ man management skills are appalling.

So Bellers was packed off to Celtic on loan and in many ways this was the beginning of the end. The team now lacked creativity and pace. When Kieron Dyer’s old Hamstring/foot/liver/eyebrow injury inevitably recurred the team suddenly looked short of ideas and this is when Souness realised that a creative genius was needed and not content with just one, he managed to find three. Jean Alain Boumsong, to whom defending is such a complicated art, was the first. If £8.5m is what he’s worth then my Mum is the pope’s wife. Then came the great Amady Faye – to this day one of the most under rated players ever…. That is if he is rated as the equivalent of a bag of treacle being eaten by a diabetic man with no taste buds and false teeth. The third of these gems was Celestine Babayaro from Chelsea who is talented but gives about as much effort as Michael Barrymore trying to fish dead bodies out of swimming pools.

Out went talented players such as Olivier Bernard and of course Bellamy who ironically eventually ended up at Blackburn. The team slumped to 14th in the league, injuries mounted up (As they had at Blackburn under Souness) and the only potential saving graces were the cups. The FA cup always looked a long shot; we were in the semi-final but faced an in-form Manchester United. The UEFA cup was more likely to bring us our first major trophy in 50 years, hopes that were soon extinguished. The 2nd of April, 2005, was one of the darkest days in Newcastle United’s 113 year history. Aston Villa came to St James’ park to face a Newcastle side that was unbeaten in nine games; they left with a 3-0 win over the EIGHT players that remained in black and white shirts. Firstly Steven Taylor was sent off for handball (Despite a great impression of a dying swan) and then any hope we still had of salvaging our season evaporated into the overcast sky. Lee Bowyer walked towards Kieron Dyer and started to throw punches at his colleague. Both players were red carded and thereafter criticised heavily in the media, but make no mistake, this was Bowyer’s fault and fans were quick to see that. Be that as it may, it was Souness who was the fall guy as his team went out of both cups with a brace of 4-1 defeats to Sporting Lisbon and Manchester United in the same week. Now nothing was left to disguise the shortcomings of the manager in a miserable inaugural season on Tyneside.

Compra online la Camisetas de fútbol! En JD encontrarás las del FC Barcelona, Real Madrid, la selección de España y equipos internacionales. by Dominic Kureen